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African Game Trails
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African Game Trails

4.2 13
by Theodore Roosevelt, Peter Hathaway Capstick (Editor), Peter Capstick (Editor)
 

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The twenty-sixth president of the United States was also a world-renowned hunter, conservationist, soldier, and scholar. In 1908 he took a long safari holiday in East Africa with his son Kermit. His account of this adventure is as remarkably fresh today as it was when these adventures on the veldt were first published. Roosevelt describes the excitement of the

Overview

The twenty-sixth president of the United States was also a world-renowned hunter, conservationist, soldier, and scholar. In 1908 he took a long safari holiday in East Africa with his son Kermit. His account of this adventure is as remarkably fresh today as it was when these adventures on the veldt were first published. Roosevelt describes the excitement of the chase, the people he met (including such famous hunters as Cunninghame and Selous), and flora and fauna he collected in the name of science. Long out of print, this classic is one of the preeminent examples of Africana, and belongs on every collector's shelf.

African Game Trails includes stories about President Theodore Roosevelt advertures throughout East Africa, Belgian Congo, Mombassa, Khartoum, etc. Travelling the world to hunt and kill dozens of animals including Lions, Rhinos, Giraffes, Leopards, Buffalo, Hippos and Elephants. This fascinating story about Teddy Roosevelt's hunting adventures are not for the squeamish or the politcally correct as it includes heart-pounding stories.

Editorial Reviews

Dallas Morning News
[Roosevelt's] descriptions of the land, the people and the game he encountered are as colorful and readable today as they were in 1910, when this classic was originally published.
Nation
A source of constant entertainment.
The New York Times
Frequently lightened by touches of genius and always readable.
The Dallas Morning News
[Roosevelt's] descriptions of the land, the people and the game he encountered are as colorful and readable today as they were in 1910, when this classic was originally published.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780312021511
Publisher:
St. Martin's Press
Publication date:
07/28/1988
Series:
Peter Capstick's Library Series
Edition description:
REV
Pages:
624
Sales rank:
684,421
Product dimensions:
5.97(w) x 8.59(h) x 1.91(d)

Read an Excerpt

Theodore Roosevelt declined to run for reelection as President of the United States in 1908. Partly as a vacation, partly to avoid the press as his friend Taft set up a new administration, (and partly for self-promotion), T.R. set out for Africa to hunt big game and collect specimens for a future exposition at the Smithsonian. Scribner's magazine underwrote the trip by paying $50,000 for twelve articles. It is these articles that eventually became African Game Trails.

In April 1909, T.R. and his son Kermit arrived in Mombasa. With an entourage of 250 porters and guides, the Roosevelts spent a year snaking across British East Africa, into the Belgian Congo and back to the Nile, ending in Khartoum. This narrative is a straightforward chronicle of the trip, laced with tips on tracking and hunting African big game, and observations and opinions about Africa and its peoples, many of which are politically incorrect by today's standards. T.R. believed in the inferiority of most African peoples and recommended they be civilized by European rule.

For the most part, however, African Game Trails is a book about big game hunting. Over the course of the year, the Roosevelts collected (i.e. shot) 1,100 specimens, including eleven elephants, twenty rhinoceroses, seventeen lions, twenty zebra, seven hippopotamuses, seven giraffes, and six buffalo. This was a different era, to be sure. In a way that makes the account all the more valuable:

"Slatter and I immediately rode in the direction given, following our wild-looking guide; the other gun-bearer trotting after us. In five minutes we had reached the opposite hillcrest, where the watcher stood, and he at once pointed out the rhino. The huge beast was standing in entirely open country, although there were a few scattered trees of no great size at some little distance from him. We left our horses in a dip of the ground and began the approach; I cannot say that we stalked him, for the approach was too easy. The wind blew from him to us, and a rhino's eyesight is dull.

"Thirty yards from where he stood was a bush four or five feet high, and through the leaves, it shielded us from the vision of his small, piglike eyes as we advanced toward it, stooping and in single file, I leading. The big beast stood like an uncouth statue, his hide black in the sunlight; he seemed what he was, a monster surviving over from the world's past, from the days when the beasts of the prime ran riot in their strength, before man grew so cunning of brain and hand as to master them. So little did he dream of our presence that when we were a hundred yards off he actually lay down.

"Walking lightly, and with every sense keyed up, we at last reached the bush, and I pushed forward the safety of the double-barreled Holland rifle which I was now to use for the first time on big game. As I stepped to one side of the bush so as to get a clear aim, with Slatter following, the rhino saw me and jumped to his feet with the agility of a polo pony. As he rose I put in the right barrel, the bullet going through both lungs. At the same moment he wheeled, the blood spouting from his nostrils, and galloped full on..."

African Games Trails is well-written and rolls along easily, like a good, long, after-dinner story. It is also a striking record of early 20th-century African culture and natural history. It is great fun and highly recommended for the non-squeamish.

Meet the Author

Theodore "Teddy" Roosevelt, future President of the United States was already a published author by the time he was twenty-five. From The Naval War of 1812 through his four-volume Winning of the West, Teddy Roosevelt proved himself a master historian...but one must not make the mistake of labeling him a stodgy academic. The future president was also a great outdoors man, with such works as Ranch Life and the Hunting Trail and African Game Trails capturing his rough and adventurous lifestyle. Theodore Roosevelt was part Francis Parkman, part Lowell Thomas, and one hundred percent spirit of America and master of the printed page.

Peter Hathaway Capstick, former Wall Street stockbroker turned professional adventurer, has been critically acclaimed as the successor to Hemingway and Ruark in African hunting literature. After hunting in Central and South America, Capstick went to Africa in 1968, where the New Jersey-born writer continues to live. He has held professional hunting licenses in four countries, and served as a game officer. He has written seven exciting books on Africa, including Death in the Long Grass, Peter Capstick's Africa, and The Last Ivory Hunter: The Saga of Wally Johnson. He's also featured in an award-winning safari video and audio tapes.

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African game trails 4.2 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 13 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Roosevelt writes in detail about his year long safari in Africa. His obsevations as a sportsman, scholar, lawmaker and gentleman are as valid now as a century ago. One of the most entertaining books about hunting. A must in an outdoorsman library.
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Guest More than 1 year ago
This is a great adventure book and a refreshing break from the oppressive regime of the political correct thought police. Hopefully we won't see the day went books like this a banned.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Good look at African hunting 100 years ago from our 26 th President.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
TR was a good president know lots
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I havent read it but it certianly looks like a good book to me
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
?......