After Her Brain Broke: Helping My Daughter Recovery Her Sanity

After Her Brain Broke: Helping My Daughter Recovery Her Sanity

by susan Inman

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Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780986652271
Publisher: Bridgeross
Publication date: 02/23/2010
Sold by: Barnes & Noble
Format: NOOK Book
File size: 137 KB

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After Her Brain Broke 2.5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 2 reviews.
meggyweg on LibraryThing 8 months ago
Meh. This book had a good story -- Molly is truly the sickest person I have EVER read about, and her parents' attempt to get help for her were truly epic. But it's just badly written. It is very short, only 165 pages long, and felt rushed and not detailed enough. I think people with severely mentally ill people in their families would find the book useful, but not the general population.
Rossa_Forbes More than 1 year ago
I ordered this book, not because I thought I would agree with it, but because there is actually another mother out there who has written about the mental health diagnosis of her child, which in this case is kickstarted by Paxil for some kind of depression/difficulties, thus raising bipolar, which then becomes schizoaffective, schizophrenia and OCD. With that many diagnoses, I would have lost my faith in psychiatry much earlier than I actually did. Susan Inman has not lost faith in psychiatry, only with the kind of psychiatry that doesn't come with a prescription. If you are a person, like I am, who believes that schizophrenia is not a brain disease and that medications are ruinous in the long run, then this book is not for you. I am dismayed about how heavily the author relies on E. Fuller Torrey. Many people feel that the references cited in this book, including E. Fuller Torrey, Dr. Nancy Andreasen, and the National Alliance on Mental Illness (NAMI) have contributed to the rise in the overuse of antipsychotic medications today. It would come as no surprise to anyone since E. Fuller Torrey endorses this book, that Susan Inman fully subscribes to the broken brain theory of mental illness. The title strikes me as an homage to psychiatrist Dr. Nancy Andreasen's book, The Broken Brain. Now even Dr. Andreasen has started to warn about the dangers of long term use of antipsychotic medication, something she helped promulgate. That's no help to the people who have suffered under this regime, but hey, again, that's how badly served people are by psychiatry. Susan Inman, despite the ten different medications her daughter has been on in about as many years, still clings to the idea that a better drug will be invented. I have a hard time with Susan Inman's other main point (and Dr. Torrey's): That the family background has nothing to do with a mental illness. She seems unwilling to even remotely entertain the idea that maybe there is something in the family environment beyond just a medical diagnosis of bipolar and epilepsy in distant relatives, that might have something to do with the rage and suspicion that her daughter spat back at her. She is upset with anybody who seems to even hint at this. Like it or not, most people labeled mentally ill, I have found, do believe it is their family that contributed to their breakdown. (People don't listen to mental patients' actual complaints.) No, the problem is with her daughter's biochemistry, she asserts. The family is not dysfunctional, her daughter is mentally ill. She bristles at the suggestion of Expressed Emotion, as she reasons that she has been very careful not to criticize her daughter. Expressed Emotion is a concept that is much larger than the family criticizing (or not) their relative. It is also the emotion around being told that you are mentally ill and that you must accept your sickness. Organizations like NAMI do this very well. How can someone get well if they are constantly told they are sick and that they must accept that they are sick or they won't get well? That is like a school teacher telling a child that they are stupid, but if they want to do well, they must first admit their stupidity. This approach is discouraged in every other area except mental health, apparently. I gave this book three stars, because it's a good read, but if you want to get over your mental health diagnosis an excellent place to start is Robert Whitaker's Anatomy of an Epidemic.