Ahead of the Curve: Two Years at Harvard Business School

Ahead of the Curve: Two Years at Harvard Business School

by Philip Delves Broughton
3.7 12

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Ahead of the Curve: Two Years at Harvard Business School 3.7 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 12 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Ahead of the Curve offers a good sense of Harvard Business School's day-to-day workings, everything from what the other students are like to the merits of each lecturer to impressions of business titans such as Warren Buffett and Stephen Schwarzman, who revolve through the doors offering pointers on how to get filthy rich. Broughton makes a delightfully clueless guide. It's so rare to see the inner workings of an institution that is everything to business, and it's a great way for an outsider to 'sharpen the saw' and brush up on leadership skills. Two other 'must haves' I've added to my leadership toolbox recently are Squawk!: How to Stop Making Noise and Start Getting Results and The Emotional Intelligence Quick Book
davehag5 More than 1 year ago
Extremely interesting and easy to read story of the author's experiences at Harvard Business School. It was inspiring and if I wasn't close to 60 I'd be tempted to get a MBA. I read the book from the library and bought it as a gift to my high powered Nephew upon his getting his CPA.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I am an alum from one of the top-ten ranked business schools that competes with HBS. My main criticisms of this book are that it wasn't that entertaining for me and I didn't learn much. On the entertainment front, I would have liked to see better anecdotes and deeper character development (in regards to classmates, professors, CEO guest speakers, and recruiters).

What did I gather from this book? 1) HBS graduates are an unhappy lot putting in avg. workweeks of 80-100 hours; 2) HBS students with no business background before coming to b-school struggle more with course work and in adapting to the HBS culture; 3) A graduate who enters the final job-search process with undefined goals will have a harder time finding a full-time job than one who has well-defined goals and is thus exuding a great deal of enthusiasm during the interview process, 4) Some CEO guest speakers make faux pas. I knew all of this before reading the book and would suspect that even prospective students may have some inkling to much of this.

I should add that many ivy league MBA graduates who I've interacted with over a 25+ year career wouldn't have it any other way (80-100 hr work weeks). They are highly committed people who derive great satisfaction from their passions (their work). Perhaps this is hard to grasp for some folks, but as my dad always said: "different strokes for different folks." Again, some top-tier MBA graduates would have it no other way and in many cases, these folks seem like they are content with their lot in life.

Only one MBA's opinion, but I got very little out of this book and did not find it engaging at all. In fact, I was disappointed after reading it. I found myself asking myself: "Why did I devote my time to reading this book?" I found other books on this topic more informative and entertaining.
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