AIX for UNIX Professionals

AIX for UNIX Professionals

by Bonnie L. Miller

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Overview

AIX for UNIX Professionals by Bonnie L. Miller

75724-5

  • AIX Architecture, boot-up and system administration
  • AIX, System V, Berkeley: similarities and differences
  • AIX-exclusive subsystems

Fast AIX answers for experienced UNIX professionals!

With the success of IBM's RS/6000 workstations, many professionals familiar with AT&T or Berkeley UNIX are being called upon to work with IBM's AIX. AIX for UNIX Professionals is the first complete tutorial and quick-reference designed to help UNIX professionals maximize their productivity with AIX fast. It serves as a concise cross-reference to features of "standard" UNIX and AIX, helping professionals leverage their existing UNIX skills and make the most of unique AIX features that aren't available in other flavors of UNIX.

  • Detailed coverage of AIX system initialization and troubleshooting
  • AIX command and control
  • Specific comparisons with AT&T UNIX System V and Berkeley UNIX
  • AIX platform guidelines
  • For all AIX system administrators, programmers, and workstation users

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780137572465
Publisher: Prentice Hall
Publication date: 09/17/1998
Pages: 184
Product dimensions: 6.00(w) x 9.00(h) x 0.50(d)

About the Author

BONNIE MILLER - a consultant who specializes in helping UNIX users master AIX - begins with a high-level view of the AIX system environment. Next, she leads you through each key AIX system feature, demonstrating specific solutions to the most common problems UNIX administrators face in migrating to AIX. No matter what UNIX environment you come from, AIX for UNIX Professionals will help you make the AIX transition without missing a beat. About the Author Bonnie Miller is a leading consultant specializing in helping UNIX professionals transition to AIX. She has been working as a systems engineer in the UNIX environment on various UNIX variants since 1984. She lives in Coppell, TX.

Table of Contents

Chapter 1 System Initialization
1(8)
1.1 Boot Device Selection: The Front Panel
1(2)
1.2 Boot Diagnostics
3(6)
Chapter 2 Object Data Manager
9(14)
2.1 ODM Structure
13(5)
2.2 Location Codes
18(2)
2.3 Location Codes
20(3)
Chapter 3 System Management Interface Tool (SMIT) for Brains
23(10)
Chapter 4 Logical Volume Manager
33(22)
4.1 Terminology
33(7)
4.2 Logical Volumes
40(4)
4.3 Mirroring
44(3)
4.4 Striping
47(1)
4.5 Reorganizing LVs
48(1)
4.6 Paging
49(3)
4.7 Configuring for Performanc
52(1)
4.8 Configuring for Availability
52(1)
4.9 Mirroring rootv
53(2)
Chapter 5 Journaled File System
55(12)
5.1 Number of Bytes Per Inod
56(1)
5.2 Fragmentation
57(1)
5.3 Compression
57(1)
5.4 Creating file systems
57(3)
5.5 JFS Log
60(2)
5.6 Quotas
62(5)
Chapter 6 Serial and Parallel Devices
67(8)
6.1 Serial Devices
67(4)
6.2 Printers
71(1)
6.3 Maintaining Devices Configured Via cfgmgr
72(3)
Chapter 7 Users and Group
75(20)
7.1 Adding Users
75(6)
7.2 The Files
81(5)
7.3 Groups
86(1)
7.4 Consistency
87(6)
7.5 Access Control List (ACL)
93(2)
Chapter 8 Trusted Computing Base (TCB)
95(6)
8.1 Terminal State Manager (TSM)
95(1)
8.2 SAK
95(2)
8.3 Trusted Shell (tsh
97(1)
8.4 TCB Database--/etc/security/sysck.cf
97(2)
8.5 Consistency Between the /etc/security/sysck.cfg File and the Data on Disk
99(2)
Chapter 9 Problem Determination
101(12)
9.1 Detailed Report Analysis
105(1)
9.2 Log Maintenance
106(3)
9.2.1 syslogd
107(1)
9.2.2 alog
107(2)
9.3 Diagnostics
109(1)
9.3.1 Classical RS/6000
109(1)
9.3.2 PCI RS/6000
109(1)
9.4 Dumps
109(3)
9.5 LEDs-IPL Related Issue
112(1)
Chapter 10 Installation
113(8)
10.1 Installing Optional Software
117(1)
10.2 Software Maintenance
118(2)
10.3 Fixes
120(1)
Chapter 11 Networking
121(18)
11.1 Domain Name Service
129(1)
11.2 Client and Server Services
130(2)
11.3 Xstations (xterminals)
132(2)
11.4 NFS
134(1)
11.5 Server Configuration
135(1)
11.6 Client Configuration
135(1)
11.7 NIS
135(4)
Chapter 12 The Queuing Subsystem
139(16)
12.1 Queue Stanza Attributes
144(1)
12.2 Device Stanza Attributes
144(1)
12.3 Virtual Printer Database
145(3)
12.4 Customizing Header and Trailer Pages
148(1)
12.5 Configuring Unsupported Printers
148(1)
12.6 Backend
149(1)
12.7 Configuring via SMIT
149(4)
12.8 Checking Print and Queue Status
153(2)
Chapter 13 Performance
155(10)
13.1 Parameter Tuning
160(2)
13.2 Network Tuning
162(1)
13.3 Tuning with no
162(3)
Appendix A Built-in Self-Test (BIST) Indicators 165(2)
Appendix B Power-On Self-Test (POST) Indicators 167(6)
Appendix C Prototype for RAMF 173(4)
Appendix D bosinstlog 177(4)
Index 181

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AIX for UNIX Professionals 2 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
The book is only 164 pages of text (not counting the appendices). The information seems pretty good, but it doesn't seem to really talk about AIX versus other forms of Unix which is what I was expecting.