Alias

Alias

by Mary Elizabeth Ryan
3.5 4

Paperback(Mass Market Paperback - 1st Aladdin Edition)

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Alias 3.5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 4 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
The novel Alias is an insipid story that had me struggling by the tenth page to keep reading. Ryan provides a thorough description of the main character, Toby, and his mother. However, the description is so thorough that I guessed the ending of the story by the second chapter. Toby describes the lifestyle that he and his mother share. She constantly changes her identity, her personality, and their lives. They never own a phone, never open bank accounts, and Toby is never allowed to ask questions. After these statements in the second chapter, I guessed why Toby and his mother moved around so much, and the rest of the book seems unimportant. For example, Toby finds an article that suggests his mother may not be who she appears to be. This part in the plot parallels the conclusion I had drawn, and is useless to me. This adds to my dissatisfaction of the book because the information repeats over and over again, instead of adding new and exciting action. I also dislike this story because despite the fact that it is about a 15-year-old, it contains few thoughts or situations that real teens are facing. Judging by this quote, Toby doesn¿t know his mother very well: ¿She shot me an exasperated look and then smiled. I couldn¿t tell whether it was a real one, or just something to sweeten me up. My mom can be a real con artist when she wants to be¿ (6). After 15 years, kids tend to know their parents quite well, especially when it comes to their behavior. Therefore, I don¿t believe that this is an accurate representation of the relationship between parents and their children. Although the opening sentence was somewhat captivating, this book never completely caught my attention. The first sentence prodded me to continue reading, but unfortunately, I never found a connection between it and the rest of the story. Besides that sentence, there were no other literary devices or lines that created any emotion. Finishing the book was no small task, as it was necessary to force myself to read a little each night, due to lack of creativity. This novel is described as being ¿suspenseful¿ by Booklist, but after reading the book I am inclined to disagree. There was no noticeable climax in the plot, or anything that created excitement or mystery in the book. I don¿t highly recommend this slow paced novel if you are looking for a thrilling, dramatic story.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Toby (age 15) and his mom spend most of their time moving. And as soon as they get settled in a new place his mother decides to change locations again, and every time they move to a new town she changes her (identity) hair style and color, her names. Neither she nor he own phones or credit cards. Toby wonders from time to time if his mother works for the CIA and if he has a father that is still alive that he doesn't know about. But his mother prefers him not to ask any questions about her personal life. When they move to Rual, Idaho things are different then they used to be. Then Toby unmasks an old news article that takes away any possibility of him and his mother living like 'regular' people. Since I don¿t want to give away the ending I won¿t tell you any more, but I will tell you a little bit about the characters. They were very realistic, and the way Mary (author) described them brought them to life in your little book-reading corner in you brain. And the setting was just like you were there on a mountain that was very isolated with not that much to do. But any ways the book was exactly like a movie where you don¿t know what¿s going to happen next and your watching every step of the way you take and your mind is constantly altering, trying to predict what is going to happen to me. It¿s basically an old fashion action scene one after another. A realistic-fiction story.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Toby (age 15) and his mom spend most of their time moving. And as soon as they get settled in a new place his mother decides to chage locations again, and every time they move to a new town she changes her (identity) hair style and color, her names. Neither her nor himself own phones or credit cards. Toby wonders from time to time if his mother works for the CIA and if he has a father that is still alive that he doesn't know about. But his mother prefers him not to ask any questions about her personal life. When they move to Rual, Idaho things are different then they used to be. Then Toby unmasks an old news article that takes away any possibility of he and his mother living like 'regular' people. If you want to find out what happens next read 'Alias', the thrilling story that sends you for a ride!
Guest More than 1 year ago
Toby (age 15) and his mom spend most of their time moving. And as soon as they get settled in a new place his mother decides to chage locations again, and every time they move to a new town she changes her (identity) hair style and color, her names. Neither her or himself own phones or credit cards. Toby wonders from time to time if his mother works for the CIA and if he has a father that is still alive that he doesn't know about. But his mother preffers him not to ask any questions aout her personal life. When they move to Rual, Idaho things are different then they used to be. Then Toby unmaskes an old news article that takes away any possibility of he and his mother living like 'regular' people. If you want to find out what happens next read 'Alias', the thrilling story that sends you for a ride!