All Clear

All Clear

by Connie Willis
4.0 81

Paperback

$15.64 $17.00 Save 8% Current price is $15.64, Original price is $17. You Save 8%.
View All Available Formats & Editions
Eligible for FREE SHIPPING
  • Get it by Wednesday, January 24 ,  Order by 12:00 PM Eastern and choose Expedited Delivery during checkout.
    Same Day delivery in Manhattan. 
    Details

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See All Customer Reviews

All Clear 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 81 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
What if this book had an editor who knew how to wield a red pencil? What if someone had actually bothered to check how many times the phrase "what if" began a sentence in this book? What if the plot wasn't sidetracked by ENDLESS worrying about "what ifs" by its principal characters? What if the story focused on what the characters actually did, rather than their incessant "what if" questioning? What if the author spent more time on the interesting details of life under the Blitz, or better fleshed out what was happening back in the future? Then, the book may have been worth reading...
harstan More than 1 year ago
The twenty-first century historians (Polly Churchill, Merope Ward, and Michael Ward) remain stuck in England during the Nazi Blitz of the country. After being separated for a time (see Blackout), they reunite in London. However, their effort to find a way to tell their future associates at Oxford in 2060 about their predicament remains impossible. They also know time is running out before Polly's presence causes a time paradox having been to this era once before. Their fears over the Polly quandary also have them afraid they may have already changed 1940, which will have ripple effects into their time and beyond. The sequel to Blackout is a fantastic time travel thriller as the trio struggles with the notions that ironically time is running out on them and they may have caused a change in the future. The story line is fast-paced, but the previous tale must be read first to grasp the nuances of All Clear. Fans will relish this strong tale as the trapped threesome in 1940 is unaware that their colleagues back in 2060 are working a time correction to insure All Quiet on the Western Front. Harriet Klausner
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Great story, well written
Go4Jugular More than 1 year ago
Review is for both Blackout and All Clear. Complaints first: 1. More historical fiction than science fiction: There is an underlying time travel/science fiction element to the books, but 95% of the content is about living in England during the years before and during WWII - Dunkirk, the Battle of Britain, the Blitz, and the V-1 and V-2 rocket attacks. 2. Total content of the two books is 25-50% too long - for example, when a character is faced with a dilemma, the reader doesn't need to hear them think through every ramification of every option they have, every time; as another example, when our heroes are escaping from a 7-story building, it isn't necessary for the author to take us through every floor, with the thoughts and concerns of each character on each floor. Overall, however, the books are highly readable, and since many chapters end in cliffhanger fashion, the story does keep one's interest. Characters are likeable and believable. And as historical fiction goes, the information is fascinating - I'm a big fan of history, and these books gave me a comprehensive appreciation of the dangers and sacrifices of the people of Britain during WWII, which lasted much longer for them than it did for American and Americans. The time travel element is also flawlessly executed, though you should keep the first novel handy as you read the second, to go back and reference chapters that, at the time you first read them, don't seem to fit the story. It's not linear, and keeping notes as to who is who, and when, will serve you well. So if you dont' mind the occasional thought of "C'mon, get on with it", these can be very enjoyable books.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Apodacticus More than 1 year ago
"All Clear" is the second half of the novel begun in the volume "Blackout." The first volume marshalls the characters, sets up their situations, and frames the terms of the mystery. The present volume is where the action takes place. The two volumes together constitute a stunning novel that explores the British home front during World War II and Ms. Willis' favorite locale, London during the Blitz. Readers should be warned that neither volume is complete without the other; the first volume ends just as the setup is complete and the action is about to begin, and the second volume will make no sense to a reader who has not read the first volume. Any reader who has not read "Blackout" shortly before plunging into "All Clear" might well find it helpful to reread volume one before starting volume two. Using her time-traveling historians as viewpoint characters, Ms. Willis explores a number of issues, in particular the distinction between what we can know of an historical event and what the experience was like for those who lived it. The overarching theme of the novel is heroism. One of the historians is present to study heroism explicitly in three specific instances during the War. He gets caught up in the rescue of the troops at Dunkirk, is wounded, and his world unravels from there. He gets a close-up view of heroism, trying to understand it in others and also finding it within himself. We also see the heroism of Londoners on the home front, a heroism called up by different circumstances yet no less real than the heroism of the battlefield. The Blitz must have been a horrific experience to those who lived during it; Ms. Willis does a superb job of evoking that period of the War, neither sensationalizing nor trivializing it. Another theme, which is present, more or less overtly, in all the time-travel novels and stories, is what I call the "rules of engagement." Each historian is forced to confront his or her position as an observer and must work out how to relate to the "contemps" he or she encounters. Here, the dilemma is acute: how do you relate yourself rightly to people who are caught in a terrible situation, when you are an observer with plans to depart? Can you make friends, must you remain aloof--and in the situation of this novel, how can you watch people suffering on such a scale without getting involved? As is usual in Ms. Willis' time-travel novels, the characters must confront unexpected behavior on the part of the space-time continuum, and as usual, the resolution is quite unexpected yet tells us something about the nature of the universe and the moral values that undergird community life. As usual, the continuum is a sort of "silent character" that moves in mysterious ways to achieve unclear ends, ends which the historians must figure out--in this novel because the answer literally means the difference between life and death for them and for the contemps for whom they have begun to care. Ms. Willis' love of screwball comedy is equally apparent in "Blackout/All Clear" as it is in "To Say Nothing of the Dog" but is transformed here into what might be more appropriately called screwball drama. The resolution to the characters' difficulties is, as is typical of Ms. Willis' novels, both unexpected and highly satisfying. I highly recommend this novel.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
It is rare that I want to reread a book as soon as I finished reading the first time.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I had a lot of questions about the premise, the sense of urgency and rush that the post grads and students exhibited in trying to get to the past to observe and study, and the lack of concern about what time travel might do. After that I enjoyed the historical narrative and remained interested in what happened to the characters for the entire rather long novel (the combination of Blackout and All Clear)
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
deesy58 More than 1 year ago
This 641-page conclusion to the first book of this two-book series ("Blackout") is probably the best Science Fiction/Fantasy book I have ever read. The detail is extremely realistic, and I have no reason to doubt that it is historically accurate. The conclusion of the story lines is emotional and surprising. I was unable to put the book down during the last 200 pages or so. Willis is certainly the best at her craft in the modern era. I thoroughly enjoyed this book, and I would recommend to anybody.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
JanYarnot More than 1 year ago
When I finished Blackout I had to get this one to find out what happened! Connie Willis always makes me care for her characters and that was true here as well. Alf and Binnie were my favorites!) I also enjoy how she puts light and funny scenes in just when they're needed to ease the tension. I'll definitely reread these books (after I reread the other books in this universe).
Anonymous More than 1 year ago