Almost Home: Helping Kids Move from Homelessness to Hope

Almost Home: Helping Kids Move from Homelessness to Hope

by Kevin Ryan, Tina Kelley
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Overview

Almost Home: Helping Kids Move from Homelessness to Hope by Kevin Ryan, Tina Kelley

Inside the lives of homeless teens—moving stories of pain and hope from Covenant House

Almost Home tells the stories of six remarkable young people from across the United States and Canada as they confront life alone on the streets. Each eventually finds his or her way to Covenant House, the largest charity serving homeless and runaway youth in North America. From the son of a crack addict who fights his own descent into drug addiction to a teen mother reaching for a new life, their stories veer between devastating and inspiring as they each struggle to find a place called home.

  • Includes a foreword by Newark Mayor Cory Booker
  • Shares the personal stories of six homeless youths grappling with issues such as drug addiction, family violence, prostitution, rejection based on sexual orientation, teen parenthood, and aging out of foster care into a future with limited skills and no support system
  • Gives voice to the estimated 1.6 million young people in the United States and Canada who run away or are kicked out of their homes each year
  • Includes striking photographs, stories of firsthand experiences mentoring and working with homeless and troubled youth, and practical suggestions on how to get involved
  • Discusses the root causes of homelessness among young people, and policy recommendations to address them
  • Provides action steps readers can take to fight youth homelessness and assist individual homeless young people
  • Written by Kevin Ryan, president of Covenant House, and Pulitzer Prize nominee and former New York Times writer Tina Kelley

Inviting us to get to know homeless teens as more than an accumulation of statistics and societal issues, this book gives a human face to a huge but largely invisible problem and offers practical insights into how to prevent homelessness and help homeless youth move to a hopeful future. For instance, one kid in the book goes on to become a college football player and counselor to at-risk adolescents and another becomes a state kickboxing champion. All the stories inspire us with victories of the human spirit, large and small. A portion of the proceeds from the sale of each book will help support kids who benefit from Covenant House's shelter and outreach services.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781118230473
Publisher: Turner Publishing Company
Publication date: 09/11/2012
Edition description: First Edition
Pages: 256
Sales rank: 198,145
Product dimensions: 9.00(w) x 6.00(h) x 0.70(d)

About the Author

KEVIN RYAN is President of Covenant House International, which reaches 56,000 at-risk and street youth in more than twenty cities across six countries. Ryan is one of the country's most respected child advocates and his work has been covered by the New York Times and the Washington Post. He has appeared on Today, Good Morning America, 60 Minutes, Anderson Cooper 360, and other national media.

TINA KELLEY was a staff writer for the New York Times for ten years and shared in a Pulitzer Prize for the paper's coverage of the September 11 attacks. She wrote 121 "Portraits of Grief" profiles of the victims and is the author of two books of poetry, The Gospel of Galore and Precise.

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Almost Home 4.7 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 3 reviews.
BrittanyAndrighetti More than 1 year ago
This book follows the lives of six young people as they face the daily struggles of not having a permanent residence. These adolescents are among the 1.6 million that have been kicked out of their homes, or aged out of the foster system. It can be assumed that the inspiration for Booker to wright this book was to enlighten the outside world to problems many North Americans face. There was a central theme of “gratitude” as many of the problems that the characters faced in the book, are issues that anyone living in a permanent home would not come across. The book did an extremely good job of making the reader feel as though they were living the lives of the characters in the book while being captivating and engaging. On the other hand, it was hard to keep up with each character, and the people in their lives. There were at least ten characters that played a role in the book, and at some points it felt very hectic. This book would be ideal for someone wanting to know more about homeless children and their success stories. If that topic does not engage a reader, then this book would not be appealing to them. Overall this book was a good read, and had a respectable lesson that followed through with each of the individual stories.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Almost Home by Cory Booker follows the lives of six young people as they face the daily struggles of not having a permanent residence. These adolescents are among the 1.6 million that have been kicked out of their homes, or aged out of the foster system. It can be assumed that the inspiration for Booker to wright this book was to enlighten the outside world to problems many North Americans face. There was a central theme of “gratitude” as many of the problems that the characters faced in the book, are issues that anyone living in a permanent home would not come across. The book did an extremely good job of making the reader feel as though they were living the lives of the characters in the book while being captivating and engaging. On the other hand, it was hard to keep up with each character, and the people in their lives. There were at least ten characters that played a role in the book, and at some points it felt very hectic. This book would be ideal for someone wanting to know more about homeless children and their success stories. If that topic does not engage a reader, then this book would not be appealing to them. Overall this book was a good read, and had a respectable lesson that followed through with each of the individual stories.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Great person