ISBN-10:
0134358996
ISBN-13:
9780134358994
Pub. Date:
01/01/1999
Publisher:
Prentice Hall School Division
America Pathway to the Present / Edition 1

America Pathway to the Present / Edition 1

by Not Available, Winkler, Perry, Reed

Hardcover

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Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780134358994
Publisher: Prentice Hall School Division
Publication date: 01/01/1999
Edition description: Student

Table of Contents

Unit ONE Building a Powerful Nation 16(256)
American History to the Civil War (Beginnings-1861)
18(68)
Exploration and the Colonial Era
19(8)
The American Revolution
27(9)
The Declaration of Independence
32(4)
The Constitution
36(32)
The Constitution of the United States
44(24)
The United States, 1789-1830
68(8)
Turning Point: The Louisana Purchase
70(6)
The United States, 1830-1860
76(10)
Why Study History? The Debate over States' Rights Continues
83(1)
Chapter Review
84(2)
The Civil War, 1861-1865
86(38)
From Bull Run to Antietam
87(8)
Life Behind the Lines
95(11)
American Artifacts: Life at War
104(2)
The Tide of War Turns
106(7)
A New Birth of Freedom
113(11)
Why Study History? Americans Remember the Civil War
119(3)
Chapter Review
122(2)
Reconstruction, 1865-1877
124(26)
Presidential Reconstruction
125(6)
Congressional Reconstruction
131(6)
Turning Point: The Fourteenth Amendment
132(5)
Birth of the "New South"
137(4)
The End of Reconstruction
141(9)
Why Study History? Congress Represents All Americans
145(1)
Chapter Review
146(2)
AmericanHeritage® My Brush with History
148(2)
The Expansion of American Industry, 1850-1900
150(26)
A Technological Revolution
151(7)
Turning Point: The Bessemer Steel Process
155(3)
The Growth of Big Business
158(5)
Industrialization and Workers
163(4)
The Great Strikes
167(9)
Why Study History? You Live in a Post-Industrial Society
173(1)
Chapter Review
174(2)
Looking to the West, 1860-1900
176(28)
Moving West
177(3)
Conflict with Native Americans
180(4)
Farming, Mining, and Ranching
184(6)
Populism
190(7)
Frontier Myths
197(7)
Why Study History? Americans Are on the Move
201(1)
Chapter Review
202(2)
Politics, Immigration, and Urban Life, 1870-1915
204(26)
Politics in the Gilded Age
205(6)
People on the Move
211(6)
The Challenge of the Cities
217(6)
Ideas for Reform
223(7)
Why Study History? Immigration Continues Today
227(1)
Chapter Review
228(2)
Daily Life in the Gilded Age, 1870-1915
230(26)
The Expansion of Education
231(5)
New Forms of Entertainment
236(6)
American Artifacts: The Growth of Sports
240(2)
The World of Jim Crow
242(5)
Women in the Late 1800s
247(9)
Why Study History? Education Is the Key to Success
251(1)
Chapter Review
252(2)
AmericanHeritage® My Brush with History
254(2)
Unit TWO The United States on the Brink of Change, 1890-1920 256(82)
Becoming a World Power, 1890-1913
258(26)
The Pressure to Expand
259(4)
The Spanish-American War
263(8)
Turning Point: The Spanish-American War
265(6)
Expansion Under Roosevelt and Taft
271(7)
Debating America's New Role
278(6)
Why Study History? Your Nation Is a World Power
281(1)
Chapter Review
282(2)
The Era of Progressive Reform, 1890-1920
284(24)
The Origins of Progressivism
285(6)
Progressive Legislation
291(5)
Progressive Presidents
296(5)
Suffrage at Last
301(7)
Why Study History? You Can Make a Difference
305(1)
Chapter Review
306(2)
The World War I Era, 1914-1920
308(30)
The Road to War
309(5)
The United States Declares War
314(3)
Americans on the European Front
317(5)
On the Home Front
322(6)
American Artifacts: African Americans' Great Migration
326(2)
Global Peacemaker
328(10)
Why Study History? Modern Warfare Poses Grave Dangers
333(1)
Chapter Review
334(2)
AmericanHeritage® My Brush with History
336(2)
Unit THREE Boom Times to Hard Times, 1919-1938 338(88)
The Twenties, 1920-1929
340(34)
A Republican Decade
341(6)
A Business Boom
347(6)
Society in the 1920s
353(5)
Mass Media and the Jazz Age
358(8)
American Artifacts: The Growth of Jazz
364(2)
Cultural Conflicts
366(8)
Why Study History? The Generation Gap Is Not New
371(1)
Chapter Review
372(2)
Crash and Depression, 1929-1933
374(28)
The Economy in the Late 1920s
375(4)
The Stock Market Crash
379(4)
Social Effecdts of the Depression
383(7)
Surviving the Great Depression
390(4)
The Election of 1932
394(8)
Turning Poing: The Election of 1932
397(2)
Why Study History? Investing Involves Risk
399(1)
Chapter Review
400(2)
The New Deal, 1933-1938
402(24)
Forging a New Deal
403(7)
The New Deal's Critics
410(6)
Last Days of the New Deal
416(10)
Why Study History? Americans Depend on Social Security
421(1)
Chapter Review
422(2)
AmericanHeritage®My Brush with History
424(2)
Unit FOUR Hot and Cold War, 1939-1960 426(112)
World War II, 1939-1945
428(30)
Prelude to Global War
429(7)
The Road to Victory in Europe
436(8)
The War in the Pacific
444(7)
The Holocaust
451(7)
Why Study History? Genocide Has Happened Again
455(1)
Chapter Review
456(2)
World War II at Home, 1941-1945
458(26)
The Shift to Wartime Production
459(5)
Daily Life on the Home Front
464(6)
American Artifacts: On the Home Front
468(2)
Women and the War
470(5)
The Struggle for Justice at Home
475(9)
Why Study History? Most Women Are in the Work Force
481(1)
Chapter Review
482(2)
The Cold War, 1945-1960
484(26)
Origins of the Cold War
485(7)
The Cold War Abroad and at Home
492(8)
Turning Point: The Marshall Plan
493(7)
The Cold War Expands
500(10)
Why Study History? Defense Spending Affects You
507(1)
Chapter Review
508(2)
The Postwar Years at Home, 1945-1960
510(28)
The Postwar Economy
511(7)
The Mood of the 1950s
518(5)
Domestic Politics and Policy
523(6)
Demands for Civil Rights
529(9)
Why Study History? Health Care Is a Growing Concern
533(1)
Chapter Review
534(2)
AmericanHeritage®My Brush with History
536(2)
Unit FIVE The Upheavel of the Sixties, 1960-1975 538(108)
The Kennedy and Johnson Years, 1960-1968
540(22)
The New Frontier
541(5)
The Great Society
546(5)
Foreign Policy in the Early 1960s
551(11)
Why Study History? Welfare Remains a Controversial Issue
559(1)
Chapter Review
560(2)
The Civil Rights Movement, 1954-1968
562(26)
Leaders and Strategies
563(7)
The Struggle intensifies
570(5)
The political Response
575(5)
Turning Point: The Civil Rights Act of 1964
577(3)
The Challenge of Black Power
580(8)
Why Study History? You Can Help Achieve Racial Equality
585(1)
Chapter Review
586(2)
Other Social Movements, 1960-1975
588(28)
The Women's Movement
589(7)
Ethnic Minorities Seek Equality
596(5)
Native American Struggles
601(5)
The Environmental Movement
606(10)
Why Study History? Crime Victims Have Rights
611(3)
Chapter Review
614(2)
The Vietnam War and American Society, 1960-1975
616(30)
Deepening American Involvement
617(5)
The Brutality of the War
622(4)
Student Protest
626(5)
The Counterculture
631(3)
The End of the War
634(12)
Why Study History? Draft Registration Is Required Today
639(1)
American Artifacts: The Vietnam Veterans Memorial
640(2)
Chapter Review
642(2)
AmericanHeritage® My Brush with History
644(2)
Unit SIX Continuity and Change, 1968-Present 646(104)
The Nixon Years, 1968-1974
648(26)
The Crises of 1968
649(4)
The Nixon Administration
653(6)
Nixon's Foreign Policy
659(5)
The Watergate Scandal
664(10)
Why Study History? Government Requires Checks and Balances
671(1)
Chapter Review
672(2)
The Post-Watergate Period, 1974-1980
674(24)
The Ford Administration
675(5)
The Carter Transition
680(4)
Carter's Foreign Policy
684(6)
Carter's Domestic Issues
690(8)
Why Study History? Americans Are Skeptical About Government
695(1)
Chapter Review
696(2)
The Conservative Revolution, 1980-1992
698(24)
Roots of the New Conservatism
699(4)
Turning Point: Election of 1980
701(2)
The Reagan Revolution
703(5)
Reagan's Second Term
708(6)
The Bush Presidency
714(8)
Why Study History? Government Efficiency Can Be Improved
719(1)
Chapter Review
720(2)
Entering a New Era, 1992-Present
722(28)
Politics in the 1990s
723(9)
The United States in a New World
732(8)
American Artifacts: The Information AGe
738(2)
Twenty-First Century Americans
740(10)
Why Study History? You Need to Stay Informed
745(1)
Chapter Review
746(2)
AmericanHeritage® My Brush with History
748(2)
Unit SEVEN Pathways to the Future 750(114)
Immigration and the Golden Door
752(8)
Gun Control and Crime
760(7)
The Minimum Wage
767(7)
Rethinking Entitlements
774(9)
The Debate Over Trade
783(9)
Foreign Policy After the Cold War
792(8)
Technology and You in the Next Century
800(64)
Epilogue: Why Study History? A Nation Looks Ahead
810(4)
Reference Section
American Literature
814(24)
A Correlation to Prentice Hall Literature: The American Experience
838(2)
Illustrated Data Bank
840(18)
Key Supreme Court Cases
858(6)
Glossary 864(16)
Spanish Glssary 880(20)
Biographical Dictionary 900(7)
Index 907(19)
Acknowledgments 926(4)
Stop the Presses! 930

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