American Furies: Crime, Punishment, and Vengeance in the Age of Mass Imprisonment

American Furies: Crime, Punishment, and Vengeance in the Age of Mass Imprisonment

by Sasha Abramsky
5.0 1

NOOK Book(eBook)

$17.99
View All Available Formats & Editions
Available on Compatible NOOK Devices and the free NOOK Apps.
Want a NOOK ? Explore Now

Overview

American Furies: Crime, Punishment, and Vengeance in the Age of Mass Imprisonment by Sasha Abramsky

In this disturbing yet elegant exposé of U.S. penitentiaries and their surrounding communities, Sasha Abramsky shows how American prisons have abandoned their long-held ideal of rehabilitation, often for political reasons. After surveying our current state of affairs-life sentences for nonviolent crimes, appalling conditions for inmates, the growth of private prisons, the treatment of juveniles-Abramsky argues that our punitive policies are not only inhuman but deeply counterproductive. Brilliantly researched and compellingly told, American Furies reveals the devastating consequences of a society that believes in "lock 'em up and throw away the key."

From the Trade Paperback edition.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780807042359
Publisher: Beacon Press
Publication date: 04/01/2007
Sold by: Penguin Random House Publisher Services
Format: NOOK Book
File size: 445 KB

About the Author

Sasha Abramsky has written for The Atlantic, The Nation, and Rolling Stone. The author of Conned: How Millions Went to Prison, Lost the Vote, and Helped Send George W. Bush to the White House and Hard Time Blues: How Politics Built a Prison Nation, he has also reported on U.S. prisons for Human Rights Watch. He lives in Sacramento, California.

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See All Customer Reviews

American Furies: Crime, Punishment, and Vengeance in the Age of Mass Imprisonment 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Abramsky's impeccably researched book left me wondering what I can do to help reclaim our country from the prison-industrial complex. This book is a must-read for anyone who cares about the implications of mass-imprisonment on the future American society.