An Actor's Guide to Romance

An Actor's Guide to Romance

by Catherine Curzon, Eleanor Harkstead

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Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781786516466
Publisher: Totally Entwined Group Ltd
Publication date: 01/23/2018
Sold by: Barnes & Noble
Format: NOOK Book
Pages: 32
Sales rank: 987,084
File size: 992 KB

About the Author

Catherine Curzon is a royal historian who writes on all matters of 18th century. Her work has been featured on many platforms and Catherine has also spoken at various venues including the Royal Pavilion, Brighton, and Dr Johnson’s House.

Catherine holds a Master’s degree in Film and when not dodging the furies of the guillotine, writes fiction set deep in the underbelly of Georgian London.

She lives in Yorkshire atop a ludicrously steep hill.


Eleanor Harkstead often dashes about in nineteenth-century costume, in bonnet or cravat as the mood takes her. She can occasionally be found wandering old graveyards, and is especially fond of the ones in Edinburgh. Eleanor is very fond of chocolate, wine, tweed waistcoats and nice pens. She has a large collection of vintage hats, and once played guitar in a band. Originally from the south-east, Eleanor now lives somewhere in the Midlands with a large ginger cat who resembles a Viking.

Read an Excerpt

Copyright © Catherine Curzon and Eleanor Harkstead 2018. All Rights Reserved, Totally Entwined Group Limited, T/A Pride Publishing.

Every hero needs his villain. The thorn in his side, the shadow on his sun, the fly on his teacake. Holmes had his Moriarty, Superman had Lex Luther, ET had the lack of intergalactic telephone lines and Thomas Fox had Adam Fisher. From that long-ago audition at drama school when each had chosen a monologue that had stopped the panel in its tracks to the first of innumerable shared curtain calls when a new Jeeves met his Wooster, he was always there, always up for the same roles, his name on the same lists that were proposed for your consideration, matching every single achievement until, still chasing one another’s shadow more than two decades after that very first meeting at RADA, together they had waited for Godot. They were like a mirror image, two careers on parallel lines, from youthful love interest to middle-aged gravitas, each as decorated, as popular, as perfect as the other.

Maybe they always would be until one died or they killed each other.

Who knows?

In any titanic struggle, the parties must know their places and right now, theirs was a dingy basement off Covent Garden, where Thomas and Adam were embracing.

“Thank god we found each other. What would I do without you, darling?”

Adam rolled his eyes. Not enough for it to be noticeable from the front row, but Thomas noticed, because he intended Thomas to notice. Because that was the sort of thing that Adam did, the sort of thing he had always done. He rolled his eyes, gave a little sigh and finally whispered, “Did you have onions at lunch?”

Then he raised his voice to an audible volume and replied, “I feel as though I’ve been searching all my life for something, and I didn’t realize until we found each other.”

Thomas gazed down at Adam’s full lips and, despite sudden stiffness in his neck, began to lower his face to kiss him. Adam blinked, his blue eyes shining when they met Thomas’ gaze, his embrace around Thomas’ waist tightening. He pursed his lips, blinked again and declared, “God, that is oniony!”

Thomas flung up his hands and backed out of their embrace. “I can’t bloody do this, Adam, if you keep titting about!”

From the side of the room there came a flurry of movement as their solo audience threw up her hands, dashing script pages across the floor. Gill Henley rose from her seat in a whirlwind of scarves and floral print and exclaimed, “For Christ’s sake, gents, this scene again! Can you not just plough through and pretend you might actually be in love? You’re supposed to be actors, so act!”

“It was a joke, darling!” Adam was all innocence now, of course, because he would be, wouldn’t he? He put his hands on his hips and addressed Thomas. “You dragged me out of character, Tom Fox. It’s a cheap way to steal a scene.”

I dragged you out of character?” Thomas felt his face flush as he tried to rein in his frustration. “You keep breaking out of character to comment on my breath! Which, I might add, does not smell of onions. And don’t bloody call me Tom Fox. I’m not a character in Wind in the bloody Willows.”

“Look,” Gill addressed them as though they were naughty schoolboys. “This isn’t a play about being gay. Stop making it the fulcrum of the drama. Your characters being gay is just part of the fabric of their lives, just like your lives. It’s not as though your whole lives are spent camping about and being as gay as gay can be, are they?”

She looked at Adam and narrowed her eyes.

“Yours is, I know that, but as a whole, gay is part of life, not life itself.” Gill held up her hand before Adam could protest. “You have one kiss in the text. It’s not the end of the world. Let’s call it a day and come back tomorrow, lips puckered, ready to kiss and move bloody on, yes?”

“Tell him.” Adam shrugged, already turning to retrieve his coat. “I’m a professional, he’s an onion-eater.”

Thomas clenched his fists. “It was a shallot, Fisher! It was not an onion!”

“Well, enjoy your evening of onions, Tom Fox.” Adam kissed Gill’s cheek and raised his hand to Thomas. “Because I am off home to study my lines. Bonsoir, my fine supporting player!”

He spun on his heel to give a deep bow then, with another wave, opened the door and disappeared into the hallway.

Even though Thomas knew that Adam could no longer hear him, he raised his chin imperiously and declared, “Equal billing, darling! I am no one’s support.”

“You both want bloody shooting.” Gill knelt to retrieve her abandoned pages. “I’ll see you in the morning, Tom—Thomas. We’ll crack it, I’m sure, and your adoring fans will never know how much you bloody hate each other.”

Thomas dragged his fingers through his hair and sighed.

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An Actor's Guide to Romance 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
MaraJ73 More than 1 year ago
For twenty years, actors Adam Fisher and Thomas Fox have been enemies when it comes to their art, competing for parts, upstaging the other for awards and recoginition. Now, not only have they been cast in the same play but they have now been cast as lovers. When their first kiss doesn't meet the directors idea of love they spend the night over a few drinks making their passion believable. An Actor's Guide to Romance is a lovely short story that is fun, lustful, humorous, and just plain entertaining. Both Catherine Curzon and Eleanor Harkstead are new authors to me and Actor's Guide makes for a wonderful introduction. Could this story have been better if we got to know more about Adam and Thomas? Perhaps, but sometimes as in life a simple night of reflection and exploration can reveal more than an in depth look at their journeys. Its been my reading experience that although it may not be unusual to explore such sexual tension or humor in the pages of a short story, it is not easy to make both this believable at the same time. The authors blend the two tropes beautifully and I will definitely be keeping my eye out for future efforts from these two ladies. Who knows maybe if we ask kindly enough we'll get to see more of Adam and Thomas down the road.