An Introduction to Evolutionary Product Development

An Introduction to Evolutionary Product Development

by Arthur O. Eger

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Product Details

ISBN-13: 9789462360587
Publisher: Eleven International Publishing
Publication date: 06/05/2013
Pages: 144
Product dimensions: 6.20(w) x 9.40(h) x 0.70(d)

Table of Contents

1 Introduction 11

1.1 Preface 11

1.2 Definitions 11

1.3 Determination of the Concept 13

1.3.1 Product Phases 14

2 Theories Related to Industrial Design Engineering: a Short History 15

2.1 Demographic Models 15

2.1.1 Veblen (1899/1994): the Theory of the Leisure Class 16

2.1.2 Mitchell (1983): the Nine American Lifestyles; who we Are and where we're Going 16

2.1.3 Foot (1996): Boom, Bust & Echo 17

2.1.4 Motivaction Research & Strategy (2011): Mentality 20

2.2 Measuring Instruments 22

2.2.1 Bense (1954): Aesthetica, Metaphysische Beobachtungen am Schönen 22

2.2.2 Berlyne (1971): Aesthetics and Psychobiology 23

2.2.3 Boselie (1982): Over Visuele Schoonheidservaring 24

2.2.4 Hekkert (1995): Artful Judgements 26

2.3 Behaviouristic Explanations 27

2.3.1 Crilly et al. (2004): Seeing Things: Consumer Response to the Visual Domain in Product Design 27

2.4 Hierarchical Structures 30

2.4.1 Maslow (1954/1976): Motivation and Personality 30

2.4.2 Woodring (1987): Retailing New Product or Design 31

2.4.3 Rogers (1995): Diffusion of Innovations 33

2.4.4 Christensen (1997): the Innovator's Dilemma 35

2.4.5 Pine and Gilmore (1999): the Experience Economy 36

2.4.6 Jordan (2000): Designing Pleasurable Products, an Introduction to the New Human Factors 36

2.5 Other Relevant Research 37

2.5.1 Forty (1986): Objects of Desire 37

2.5.2 Krishnan and Ulrich (2001): Product Development Decisions: a Review of the Literature 38

2.5.3 Prahalad and Ramaswamy (2004): the Future of Competition: Co-Creating Value with Customers 39

3 Evolutionary Product Development 41

3.1 Conclusions Regarding Theories Related to Industrial Design Engineering 41

3.1.1 From Deterministic to Evolutionary Models 42

3.2 Product Phases 44

3.3 Product Characteristics 45

3.4 Description of the Product Phases 46

3.4.1 Performance 46

3.4.2 Optimization 47

3.4.3 Itemization 47

3.4.4 Segmentation, Individualization and Awareness 48

3.4.5 Segmentation 48

3.4.6 Individualization 49

3.4.7 Awareness 50

3.5 How to Use the Model 51

3.5.1 Education 51

3.5.2 Design Practice 51

3.5.3 Styling 52

4 Retrospective Case Surveys 53

4.1 Electric Shaver 53

4.2 Mobile Phone 58

4.3 Bicycle 64

4.4 Working-Class Housing 68

4.5 Travelling 74

5 Technological Innovation as an Evolutionary Process 79

5.1 Introduction 79

5.2 Case Study: Development of Child Restraint Systems 81

5.2.1 Incubation Period 81

5.2.2 Car Safety Features that Have Influenced Child Passenger Safety Expectations 81

5.2.3 The First Safety-Focused Child Restraint Seats 82

5.2.4 Initially not All CRSS Were Safe 82

5.2.5 Consumer Guides Start Influencing Legislation 84

5.2.6 Legislation Starts to Influence CRS Design 85

5.2.7 Types Come and Go 85

5.2.8 Perception of CRS Change and Categorization Starts/Dominant Design Directions Emerge 86

5.2.9 Coincidence Influences CRS Legislation 86

5.2.10 Focus Shifts to Details 87

5.2.11 Standardization and Safety Programme Organizations 88

5.2.12 Consumer Associations 89

5.2.13 Increasing Scale at Manufacturers Reduces Regional Design Differences 90

5.3 Perspectives on the Development of CRSS 91

5.3.1 Using Tree Diagrams 91

5.3.2 Mapping the Development of CRSS in a Product Family Tree 91

5.3.3 Relation between Development of Artifact and Ecosystem 92

5.4 Product Family Tree for Use in Evolutionary Product Development Context 94

5.4.1 Why Use It 94

5.4.2 How to Construct One 94

6 EPRO Tool 97

6.1 Introduction 97

6.2 The Innovation Paradox 97

6.3 An Evolutionary Approach 99

6.4 The Development of the Tool 101

6.4.1 Research Questions 101

6.4.2 The Pilot 102

6.4.3 Extended Research 103

6.5 Towards the Final Tool and How to Use It 105

6.5.1 Optimization of the Tool 105

6.5.2 The New Tool 106

6.5.3 Using the Tool 110

6.5.4 Elaborated Example of a Product for Aquatic Sports 111

7 Research Performed to Verify the Theory of Evolutionary Product Development 113

7.1 Study 1: Retrospective Case Survey 113

7.2 Study 2: Ranking by Experts 114

7.3 Study 3: IDE Students' Use of the Model in the Evolutionary Product Development Course 121

7.4 Discussion 127

References 131

Figure Sources 136

About the Authors 137

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