An Unpresentable Glory

An Unpresentable Glory

by Eleanor K. Gustafson

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Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781620208427
Publisher: Emerald House Group, Incorporated
Publication date: 07/01/2018
Pages: 368
Product dimensions: 6.00(w) x 1.25(h) x 9.00(d)

About the Author

Eleanor K. Gustafson has been publishing both fiction and nonfiction since 1978. Her short stories and articles appear in a number of national and local magazines. An Unpresentable Glory is her sixth novel. In many of her stories, Eleanor explores the cosmic struggle between good and evil in light of God’s overarching work of redemption. A graduate of Wheaton College in Illinois, she has been actively involved in church life as a minister's wife, teacher, musician, writer, and encourager. She has enjoyed a variety of experiences, from riding horses to building houses, all of which have helped bring color and humor to her fiction. She and her husband live in Massachusetts, where he taught philosophy for many years. They have traveled extensively, spend time with their three children and eight grandchildren, and enjoy camping at the family forest in Chester, Vermont.

Read an Excerpt

CHAPTER 1

ON HER RETURN FROM CHURCH, Kileenda Jensen discovered a problem, and it had nothing to do with her name. Hardly anyone called her Kileenda. Early on, her parents shortened her name to Leenda, which quickly morphed to Linda. Now she herself, on all but the most serious and sacred of documents, signed herself as Linda. Though her parents, deeply rooted in Westchester County, New York, had made tiresomely sure she knew her uncommon heritage and social standing, Linda herself was comfortable with a plain name because her real worth did not rest on money or position.

Her immediate problem lay face-down between her perennial border and clematis arbor — more specifically, a man who looked to be either dead or unconscious. She assumed the less bleak view and spoke to him.

"Hello. Are you all right?" Stupid question. He was obviously not all right, but she could see neither blood nor bruise. Inordinately handsome, yes — but what was wrong?

A gray eye opened tentatively, then closed. "I'm ... in your way."

His voice conjured up Uncle Joshua reading The Velveteen Rabbit. Comforting, caring ... and a hint of a smile, perhaps?

But comforting voices from the past were irrelevant. This man, right now, needed care. She knelt beside him. "What can I do for you? Are you ill? Did you fall?"

"No," he said. "Just. Catch. My. Breath."

"I could call 911. Or take you to a doctor. It's Sunday, but —"

The fleeting smile vanished. "No! I'll be all right." He straightened his splayed limbs and turned on his side to look at her. In his forties? she wondered. His drawn, pinched face hurt his looks only marginally.

"Delphiniums ... dragged me in and ..."

Linda sat back and laughed. "Stop! You have to do better than that. You can't see my yard from the road, and with the gate closed ... Maybe you came from the nature preserve next door? Doesn't seem —"

"Yes ... off the trail ..."

"A bit," she replied tartly. "Two roads and twelve 'Posted' signs. But what's to be done with you? You obviously can't finish your hike — or whatever you were doing — and you don't want me to call 911. Who can I call?" "Please. Give me a minute. I'll be all right."

Her mouth pursed. "You're not all right." She evaluated the stranger, weighing her options. His eyes were glazing, his skin pallid. Whatever was wrong wasn't improving. He couldn't be feigning illness; she was sure of that. Nevertheless, could he be trusted indoors? She recklessly decided to test the theory.

"Can you walk to my house? A hundred feet or so?"

His face turned fractionally incredulous. "You don't mean that. Your husband ...

"I'm not married. I live alone." Dumb! Why tell him that?

He shook his head and echoed her thoughts. "What are you thinking? Why —"

He broke off and draped an arm over his face in a gesture of helplessness.

She grimaced. "Never mind. I'm thinking you're going downhill fast; and if I don't get you indoors, I'll have to care for you out here, and that would be hard. I could go call the police. But if I move toward the house, you'll crawl away, and I don't want to be responsible for what might happen to you." She spoke in a rush, then brushed a twig from his gray sweatshirt. "Yes, this tops the list of "Stupid Things to Do," but I can tell a lot from a person's eyes, mouth, and the way he talks; and you pass. Just raising the question speaks well of you. Now, if I help you along, will you come into my house? And quickly, please. You're a bit much to carry."

He looked at her bleakly, then away. "The cost ..." he said to the sky. "I know what's wrong ... not life threatening. Time ... sleep ... couple days. But please don't tell anyone I'm here." He looked back, imploring. "Not a hooligan. Promise." He closed his eyes, rocking his head forlornly. "Please. Go inside. Forget. A poor time ... delphiniums ..."

She leaned over and grasped his arm. "You're fading. Come," she said gently. "Check my indoor flowers."

With her help, he pulled himself to his full height of six-plus feet, his face turning to chalk. He bent to force blood to his head; and when he straightened, she wondered if he'd make it to the stone patio, let alone the house.

By sheer grit, he did make it. Once inside her sprawling, dark-wooded house, he pulled for the nearest chair, but she murmured, "This way," and steered him down a cool hallway to a small bedroom. He staggered toward the bed, but she held him back long enough to yank off the bedspread and pull back the sheet and blanket.

"Now, sit, but let's get your sweatshirt off before you lie down. Much easier."

After she worked it off, he fell on the double pillows as though unconscious. She untied his sneakers and drew them off, but his jeans gave her pause. He had wet himself. Did it happen on the way in? Whenever, it required action — right away. She knew how to undress men, having cared for her father in his last days, but this was different. Was this man asleep, or maybe unconscious? That would be best for such a procedure. She decided to wait a few minutes.

She sat down and blew a breath. What was wrong, and what could she do about it? He had said it wasn't life threatening, but shouldn't she call a doctor? This is really stupid. A man — in my house — mysteriously ill — requesting secrecy. Was there any identification? No wristwatch even, and nothing bulged in his pockets. Who is this guy?

She studied his broad head and tapered, stubbly jaw. Only his temples and chin showed signs of gray. His nose sketched an irregular line down his face, and an untidy clump of hair fell across his bloodless forehead. She reached to pick wisps of hemlock detritus from hair that itself resembled hemlock bark — scraggy, with a reddish tinge. Yes, he had come from the preserve, one of the few stands of hemlock in Westchester County.

He seemed cool to her touch — too cool, actually. No fever. No rash. Pulse rapid, but steady. No sign of a cold or congestion. A virus, perhaps? Lyme disease? She had no clue. He could die right here in her guest bedroom. How would she explain that? He had said it wasn't life threatening, but had she done the right thing? If she'd gone inside for her phone, how far could he possibly have crawled? Certainly not through her locked gate. And why wasn't she calling 911, despite what he'd asked? She shook her head and sighed. What I've done, I've done — stupid or not. Lord, You dumped this man here. Help me care for him with dignity and honor.

Heart accelerating and hands trembling, she unfastened his button and zipper. Pulling the sheet over him, she grabbed jeans and underwear and tugged the clothing below his hips, keeping watch on his eyes. Relieved at no response, she worked them the rest of the way off, then checked his pockets. Nothing but lint and hemlock needles — proof positive of the woods route. She sighed, took his clothing to the laundry basket, and hunted for an alternate garment to cover his nakedness. An old pair of roomy pajamas would give him a trace of dignity. More maneuvering under the sheet, and she had him tucked up and apparently unaware — or unconcerned — about the procedure.

What next? Water is always good for what ails you. Lots of water. Should she give him Aspirin? No. Allergies and all. Water, though, should be safe. She went to the kitchen and drew a pitcher of warmish water. With glass and articulated straw, she returned to the bedroom. But did he need water more than sleep? To find out, she stroked his head until his gray eyes opened.

"A drink of water? Try a sip." His eyes closed again; but to her surprise, his mouth opened, and he drew most of the glassful through the straw.

Sleep and water seemed good. And time, he had said. He slept as she ate her sandwich and nectarine, and every hour she pushed as much water as he would take.

Toward evening, after he drank, his eyes remained open with a frantic, deer-in-the-headlights expression. Uh-oh. Water in, water out. He must be desperate. What to do? She couldn't get him up; he could hardly open his mouth. Her only option was to go at it forthrightly and see what happened.

She'd need a container. Her father had used a plastic urinal, but that was long gone. A bottle, maybe? She ran to the kitchen and settled on a quart-sized plastic container that looked ideal, but as she hurried to the bedside, she realized the mouth was none too big. Major complication. Why hadn't she grabbed a yogurt container? No time now; his eyes were fixed on her.

"I have a jar. Can you manage it?" She smiled brightly.

His hand crept toward the bottle, but when he tried to grasp it, his eyes closed in despair.

All right. Forthrightness. She couldn't even fall back on father experience here. Her dad had been able to see to himself until the day he died.

She drew off sheet and pajamas, watching his face closely. No panic — yet. With a big breath, she positioned the container appropriately. "Okay — go to it." For a moment, she wondered if she should've grabbed a larger container, but the stream finally stopped, and she covered him again. The relief on his face was unmistakable. She patted his arm and went out to empty the catch. When she returned, his breathing was again heavy with sleep. She backed off and scrabbled in the kitchen for a yogurt tub.

* * *

At night, he slept a lot, and she slept little on the floor with her three-cushion bed and pillow. She checked him several times, terrified at the thought of finding a cold body. Though not cold, he remained far too cool to suit her. She rubbed his arms and legs and spread an extra blanket.

Linda reflected on what she'd done so far. She'd been right in bringing him indoors, taking off his clothing. She had served him in his time of need, and the very doing of it became a moment of glory, with angels present in the room, serving her as she served him. She had felt this tangible Presence the night before her father died as she watched over him alone, her mother being on the point of collapse.

* * *

At daybreak, the sound of water in the yogurt tub woke Linda. She was about to spring up but thought better of it and waited till he resettled. He had carefully set the container where it wouldn't be kicked over, and she tiptoed out to empty and rinse it.

When she returned, his eyes were open, dark and sunken, his skin pasty. She stroked his head. "You do exist behind those eyelids."

He murmured, "I blink; therefore, I am."

She laughed heartily. Nothing wrong with his wit. "Do I hear Descartes chuckling from his grave?" She put glass and straw to his lips. "How about something to eat? Never mind. I'll bring something, and we'll see what you're up for."

She returned with a tray of bland digestibles — applesauce, mashed banana, dry toast. He raised his hand. "No banana. Brought this on."

Her eyebrows went up. "Ooh! Glad to have that bit of information." She propped him with yet another pillow and fed him the rest, as much as he would take. As she brushed away crumbs, she asked, "Am I allowed to call you anything other than sir?"

His crooked smile brought warmth to the sunken contours of his face. "How about Jay? Your name?"

She considered saying Kileenda, but changed it to Linda. But why had her face grown warm?

"Linda." He tasted it. "Linda. Beautiful name, beautiful person." He smiled wryly. "Does illness excuse lame lines?" Linda rolled her eyes. "Well, either you're outrageously gracious or hopelessly blind."

"Do I have to choose between outrageous and hopeless?"

She smiled impishly. "Um ... let's not go there." She picked up the tray. "Can I get anything else for you?"

He smiled but shook his head. "You've been ... more than kind." And she understood what he meant.

(Continues…)


Excerpted from "An Unpresentable Glory"
by .
Copyright © 2018 Eleanor K. Gustafson.
Excerpted by permission of Ambassador International.
All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher.
Excerpts are provided by Dial-A-Book Inc. solely for the personal use of visitors to this web site.

Table of Contents

Title Page,
Praise for An Unpresentable Glory,
Copyright Information,
Dedication,
Preface,
Opening Bible Verse,
Chapter 1,
Contact Information,
Did you enjoy this book?,

What People are Saying About This

Award-winning author of A Conspiracy of Breath and Latter-day Cipher - Latayne C. Scott

“Gustafson’s literary treatment of a theme of redemption and restoration is set in a literal garden of delights. It is both a parable and a provocative contemporary story, crafted by a writer who is skilled, precise, and imaginative in her use of words.”

Author of Premium Mixed Nuts: An Anthology - Ralph D. James

“Eleanor Gustafson is a sensitive and skilled writer who has not only an authentic relationship with the Lord, but a powerful relationship with language. You feel the beauty of an enchanting Westchester garden and the bitter cold of a North Dakota winter as she deftly weaves a disparate cast of powerfully presented characters and settings into this tale of love, loss, redemption, and unpresentable service. Gustafson puts 1 Corinthians 12:22-27 into action in An Unpresentable Glory. Yah, you betcha!”

co-author of the bestselling Windy Gap Wishes series - Rachel L. Miller

“A story our weary world desperately needs . . . An intense and personal exploration of one woman’s journey of faith and the struggle to follow God’s leading in this modern world of ours.”

Author of Don’t Tell the Rabbi Series - Sigrid Fowler

“The lives of Jay and Linda twist and turn like paths in her garden—from light to shade, from a trollish darkness of injustice and fear, anger, grief, and regret, to the light of God’s love, forgiveness, and new life. Shock and uncertainty become epiphanies. Loose ends come together, the unpresentables make us pause and consider. The novel has substance, the style smooth as a current of cool water over rounded stones. A pleasure.”

Author of I Always Cry at Weddings - Sara Goff

“An Unpresentable Glory is a spiritual pilgrimage, a fairy tale, and a mystery all in one, but most of all it is a story about the unexpected miracles that come when you give of yourself for someone else. Eleanor Gustafson writes with humor and heart.”

From the Publisher

“A story our weary world desperately needs . . . An intense and personal exploration of one woman’s journey of faith and the struggle to follow God’s leading in this modern world of ours.”
—Rachel L. Miller,
co-author of the bestselling Windy Gap Wishes series “An Unpresentable Glory is a spiritual pilgrimage, a fairy tale, and a mystery all in one, but most of all it is a story about the unexpected miracles that come when you give of yourself for someone else. Eleanor Gustafson writes with humor and heart.”
—Sara Goff
Author of I Always Cry at Weddings “Eleanor Gustafson is a sensitive and skilled writer who has not only an authentic relationship with the Lord, but a powerful relationship with language. You feel the beauty of an enchanting Westchester garden and the bitter cold of a North Dakota winter as she deftly weaves a disparate cast of powerfully presented characters and settings into this tale of love, loss, redemption, and unpresentable service. Gustafson puts 1 Corinthians 12:22-27 into action in An Unpresentable Glory. Yah, you betcha!”
—Ralph D. James
Author of Premium Mixed Nuts: An Anthology “The lives of Jay and Linda twist and turn like paths in her garden—from light to shade, from a trollish darkness of injustice and fear, anger, grief, and regret, to the light of God’s love, forgiveness, and new life. Shock and uncertainty become epiphanies. Loose ends come together, the unpresentables make us pause and consider. The novel has substance, the style smooth as a current of cool water over rounded stones. A pleasure.”
—Sigrid Fowler
Author of Don’t Tell the Rabbi Series “Gustafson’s literary treatment of a theme of redemption and restoration is set in a literal garden of delights. It is both a parable and a provocative contemporary story, crafted by a writer who is skilled, precise, and imaginative in her use of words.”
—Latayne C. Scott
Award-winning author of A Conspiracy of Breath and Latter-day Cipher “In An Unpresentable Glory, Ellie Gustafson has spun another tale that will stay with the reader long after the last page has turned. This unlikely love story is as timely as the latest scandal out of Washington and as timeless as the long history of human tragedy.
“From the mystery of the opening pages through a myriad of twists and turns and surprises to the tantalizing questions of the epilogue, an intricate plot draws the reader ever deeper into the lives of Linda, “Jay,” and a sprawling cast of lovingly-drawn supporting characters.
“An Unpresentable Glory is not about politics, or gardening, or immigration, or marital love and honor; and yet all of these are here in rich and intriguing detail. Like the paths of a well-designed garden, Jay and Linda’s lives lead in unexpected directions, but ultimately point to the gracious hand of the God of mercy.”
—Sally Wilkins
Writer and Teacher “In An Unpresentable Glory, Gustafson weaves an intricate plot of unexpected twists and turns surrounding Kileenda Jensen and a stranger she finds sprawled in her renowned garden. God’s grace and providence govern every episode of this tale of searching and sacrifice that will leave the reader’s soul enriched.”
—Brenda Cox
Author of Tethered: The Life of Henrietta Hall Shuck, The First American Woman Missionary to China (Finalist for Best Books Award and Foreword INDIES Award)

Author, Finalist for Best Books Award and Foreword INDIES Award - Brenda Cox

“In An Unpresentable Glory, Gustafson weaves an intricate plot of unexpected twists and turns surrounding Kileenda Jensen and a stranger she finds sprawled in her renowned garden. God’s grace and providence govern every episode of this tale of searching and sacrifice that will leave the reader’s soul enriched.”

Writer and Teacher - Sally Wilkins

“In An Unpresentable Glory, Ellie Gustafson has spun another tale that will stay with the reader long after the last page has turned. This unlikely love story is as timely as the latest scandal out of Washington and as timeless as the long history of human tragedy.

“From the mystery of the opening pages through a myriad of twists and turns and surprises to the tantalizing questions of the epilogue, an intricate plot draws the reader ever deeper into the lives of Linda, “Jay,” and a sprawling cast of lovingly-drawn supporting characters.

“An Unpresentable Glory is not about politics, or gardening, or immigration, or marital love and honor; and yet all of these are here in rich and intriguing detail. Like the paths of a well-designed garden, Jay and Linda’s lives lead in unexpected directions, but ultimately point to the gracious hand of the God of mercy.”

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An Unpresentable Glory 4.1 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 13 reviews.
RealWorldBibleStudy 21 days ago
Things I Loved About An Unpresentable GloryI love the image of God's "unpresentable glory" in this novel.  For me, it's the things that God has done that are behind the scenes, things that are maybe not mentionable in polite company.  I love that God enters into the undignified places in our lives and shines his light in there - even if no one else will ever see. I loved the gardens and garden imagery in this novel. I don't know a ton about gardens - my sister is the agronomist.  I know, I know - I should have consulted a soil scientist.  Let this one marinate for a bit: what are the weeds in my life that need to be pulled, stomped out? I loved the two outstanding groups of friends Jay meets and bonds with in this story.  TWO.  (I guess he can have two groups since he has to bounce back and forth between two cities. But still.  I'm a little jealous.  Oops, there's a weed!).  (Yes. Jealous of a fictional character.  Yup. That's me.)  This is something I am trying to cultivate in my life.   But Jay has the benefit of being introduced to these groups that he then connects with.  I keep trying to find those groups, or build them myself. Some Thoughts About Style This book felt long, and I love long books and usually get into them without even noticing.  It took me some time to get into it.  Once I did, I really did like the story.  I really liked Jay's journey of faith and friendship especially.  I didn't always like the way it was told.  There were a few moments where I thought "do people actually talk like that in 2018?"  I also felt like there was a rush to tie things up at the end.  The style wasn't my favorite, and I think this just may be a personal preference/genre preference thing.  Overall, though, I did like this book, and would recommend it to those who enjoy literary fiction.  If you're looking for something fast-paced, this isn't your book, but if you'd like to be prompted towards introspection, it just might be. I received a review copy of this book; all opinions are my own.
Virginiaw 22 days ago
This is definitely a different kind of romance. Both Linda and Lawrie learn to put their lives in Gods hands. Both of these characters go through many trials and tribulations before and after they meet. I cried many times while reading this book. I received a copy of this book from Celebratelit for a fair and honest opinion that I gave of my own free will.
Deana0326 24 days ago
This story reminds me of a package that you unpack anxiously awaiting the gift that is buried under piles of paper. You have to remove each layer until the gift appears. It is like getting rid of unwanted weeds in a garden so you can see the beauty that God has provided. Each time I think about the book, I realize just how precious the words are that filled my soul with a deep love I have never felt. Linda is a gifted gardener who takes flowers and makes them works of glory. The gardens provide peace and comfort. When she discovers a man one day in her garden, she didn't know that that one moment would change her life forever. I loved how she took the man in even though he was a stranger. She saw this man as Jesus did. He was in need of kindness and to be shown the love of God. It would be hard to welcome a stranger into my home, but I know I couldn't turn away someone in need. Though their time together was brief, it set the stage for a story that will leave a lasting mark on many. Lawrie is a senator that has been under tremendous pressure. As he takes time to get his energy back, he senses a kindred spirit with Linda. She is kind, caring and asks nothing from him. Did God bring Lawrie to this woman? Will he find what he has been looking for to heal his broken heart? I loved the time they spent together and how they respected each other without crossing the line. After all Lawrie is a married man and the thought of being unfaithful is not why he was there. The story does have a political aspect to it and I did enjoy the part about Native Americans. It did show how even today they still have to fight for what was theirs. It really was a great addition to the story and allowed us to see inside the political world. Lawrie is torn when he has to make a big decision about his political career. His life will take a dark turn as rumors mount against him. Can he protect Linda from the medial? What will his wife beleive when she starts to hear the murmurs in Washington about her husband? There is a lot happening in the story but don't overlook the presence of God in every decision, every word and every unexplained moment that reminds us He will never leave us. Lawrie does seem to go through many hard moments; almost like Job in the Bible. I began to worry that Lawrie would give up and miss out on the most precious gift awaiting him. The story is also about the love between two people who feel they can't be together but never forget the brief time they spent together. There is some difficult subjects in the book that may be triggers for some such as suicide and depression. The author handles both subjects with grace and compassion. This is not your typical love story but a much deeper story of finding peace, happiness and hope. I finished the book and sat for a moment soaking in the presence of God. I felt it throughout the book and the message was clear to me. When you need it most, God in his wisdom will send at just the right time, "An Unpresentable Glory.' I received a copy of this book from Celebrate Lit. The review is my own opinion.
Ourpugs 24 days ago
Unpresentable Glory At the first of the book Linda finds Jay who is sick. She took him to her place to care for him. Loved how she took care of him and then accepted that he had to leave once he was well. She finds out actually who he was afterwards. There was a little bit part of the book that was not as interesting but it did get better. The book was very inspiring, a very different kind of love story. Loved the friendship of Linda and Bonnie. Their friendship brought so much to the story. I received a complimentary copy of the book from the publisher through Celebrate Lit. I was not required to write an positive review.
5643437 26 days ago
An Unpresentable Glory by Eleanor K. Gustafson draws the reader into the pages from the very start of the book. The characters demonstrate both Christian love and Christian failings all at the same time. The relationships in the book have a feeling of truth about them rather than the artificialness that many authors utilize. Truly, this is a book worth reading. The use of gardening as a means of moving the story along brings an interesting twist to the story. Linda Jensen exudes the nature of a wealthy person who does good things with that wealth rather than just accumulating it or using for less than stellar purposes. Ellie Gustafson does a remarkable job of conveying what it must be like to be in politics and still have real-life issues at home to deal with on a daily basis, both good and bad. Jay, whom we first meet in Linda’s garden, shows a strength of character in the way he cares for his wife, even though the worst of circumstances surround them. His wife seems to be the typical wealthy socialite who is only concerned with herself. So if you want to read a book that goes beyond being superficial and examines life with all the good, the bad, and the ugly, check out this book for yourself.
NKBookReviewer 28 days ago
“An Unpresentable Glory” is a contemporary Christian novel. Filled with mystery, suspense, and romance the 368 pages went by quickly as I read it nonstop. My love for plants and flowers blossomed. I enjoyed the garden and floral setting. Author Gustafson has a delightful style of writing. It is smooth as butter and glides without a bump or hitch. Her use of humor and metaphors made me smile. The characters were vividly described and I found them well rounded and relatable. I felt like I knew Linda well. It was easy to become invested in this story. I was hooked from the very first page. The faith element was easily identifiable. This is a God glorifying book. Life lessons are woven all throughout this offering. Relenant, timely lessons for today were tackled. Also, I even learned a thing or two. All of those make for a wonderful reading experience. This is a beautifully written book. It is well planned, researched, organized, and executed. Author Gustafson is an extremely gifted wordsmith. Her book gently took my hand and took me inside its pages. I felt the story! I was there while reading it. Only great authors can do that. I highly recommend this book. It is the perfect escape for contemporary fiction lovers. A church readers group or any book club would relish discussions on this jewel. I gladly rate it 5 out of 5 stars. A copy was provided by Celebrate Lit but all opinions are my own, honest ones.
ARS8 3 months ago
This was quite an unexpected novel for me. The back blurb only gives an inkling of what you may expect in the book. This was a story that really deals with a lot of topics that affect us in today’s culture. Some parts of this book were like watching the news, because it was so relevant the story felt all the more real, especially the role social media can play in destroying people and how the culture would rather believe lies than the truth. This story is a journey of two souls who briefly have come in contact but have changed each other’s lives forever. There was some interesting learning parts, especially the behind the scenes of certain jobs. This story really focused on how the world judges, even when no sin was committed. I do not want to say much more about the plot as it was an experience to read it not knowing anything about it except for the back blurb. I will certainly be thinking about this book for a while. I received a copy of this novel from the author. I was not required to post a positive review and all views and opinions are my own.
TheBeccaFiles 4 months ago
I genuinely tried with this one but I couldn't. Unfortunately most of what I didn't like I can't share without revealing spoilers. The easiest way I can put this is that when you aren't a fan of the backstory it makes the story going forward more difficult to endure. I believe the story had potential, and the description seemed intriguing--but the reality wasn't a fit. For that reason I couldn't get into the story and despite trying very hard--couldn't make it through. I've seen some other people really enjoy it though so I recommend checking out some other reviews before settling on your own conclusions towards it. *I received a copy of this book from CelebrateLit. Thoughts and opinions expressed are mine alone.
directorgirl11386 More than 1 year ago
An Unpresentable Glory by Eleanor Gustafson is a heartwarming romance with great twists. It is a fiction story that covers a variety of topics such as mental illness, depression, loneliness. Eleanor K Gustafson gives some history on Native American and Latino. It shows what being a true Christian is all about. Linda welcomes a total stranger who goes into anaphylactic shock. Linda couldn't leave him on his own so she welcomes this complete stranger into in her house. She allowed him to stay until he was recovered. Without giving out too much information, Linda learns who this stranger is on TV. Eleanor's characters are well thought out and relatable. She showed what kindness, faith and love looks like. As a reader, I was able to picture each character clearly. What I love most about this book is Eleanor gave an unbiased look into the political scene and it wasn't a preachy faith-based book. I could see her book being made into a Hallmark channel. I highly recommend getting An Unpresentable Glory. The only con about this book is you won't be able to put it down until you finish it.
WarrriorPrincess More than 1 year ago
Imagine returning home one evening and finding an injured man sprawled in the yard, what now? Societal norms dictate a call to 911 the next logical action, but what if the injured individual is adamantly opposed because he has secrets such a call would reveal? Linda Jensen found herself in this very situation. Her impulsive decision would create a domino effect that would impact many lives, in very unanticipated ways, before the final piece toppled. Jay, AKA the wounded stranger leaves an indelible mark on Linda’s life and he on hers. Readers with romantic notions will wonder at the plot, but with the many twists, turns and changes of venue the story takes may get lost and need to regroup. Eleanor Gustafon’s An Unpresentable Glory is a peculiar tale of family, politics, wealth, friendship, love and loss. While the author gives nod to an explanation of the book’s title within the story, it is somewhat convoluted and difficult to grasp. Overall, the book is a decent way to pass a quiet evening. ***The publisher provided a free book. However, all opinions included in this review are entirely my own.
Librarycataloger More than 1 year ago
"My friend Linda Jensen's reputation has been injured, along with that of Senator Lawrence Crofter. And I inadvertently made it happen. A reporter turned a totally innocent remark into a scurrilous bit of muck that damaged them both. I sincerely regret talking with this man and dropping the clue that led him to put together the worst possible construct." This conversation sounds like it could have been spoken on the nightly news but it is instead found in this new book by Eleanor K. Gustafson. 'An Unpresentable Glory' touches on a theme that is all too prevalent in today's society. A Senator is suddenly under attack and charged with a sexual encounter that never occurred and the public is overly eager to assume the worst. This is a beautifully written story between the Senator and the young woman who helps him in a time of need. They do grow to love each other deeply but they aren't guilty of physically acting upon their affection. This book paints a vivid picture of sins imagined and sins that are real; grief and tragedies that seem to overwhelm both of these characters and the possibility that all of the Senator's political achievements and victories will be lost. This is the first book that I've read by this author but she is a wonderful storyteller and it is obvious that she possesses a deep faith. Eleanor K. Gustafson shares it in this story with its underlying message that God is always there, His love remains forever and redemption is available to all of us. I especially like how she describes "God interventions" as "unpresentable glories". These are the times when troubles turn into blessings and I have experienced many of these in my own life! I received a complimentary e-book copy of this book via Just Read Tours, and am under no obligation to write a positive review. All thoughts and opinions are my own.
Becky6 More than 1 year ago
I think I’m going to be one of the few who wasn’t a fan of “An Unpresentable Glory” by Eleanor Gustafson. I struggled to get in this one. This story has a powerful idea about an unpresentable glory. What does that mean exactly? An unpresentable glory is when looked at from the surface level does not look good, but is actually a type of kindness towards another person that allows the person to see the glory of God. It sounds confusing, but it is a kindness done to another person that doesn’t seek recognition. This was something that I enjoyed and found challenged me to ask myself when I do things if I’m doing it for the glory of God or am I doing it to be recognized by others. This also deals with some heavy topics such as suicide, grief, amongst a bunch of other things that just makes Lawrie’s life tough. Without going into any detail a stir of events makes the reader wonder what else is going to go wrong for the poor guy. This was something I appreciated because it shows imperfect characters going through real things. I enjoyed watching his conversion to God and how he finds a great group of guys in a Bible study who become his accountability partners. The main thing that I struggled with was that I felt that the characters were two-dimensional. I felt like they were distant and I couldn’t relate to them at all. There were also times that I felt that the story dragged and that there was too much detail. For example, Linda, our main female character, is a gardener. There was one chapter towards the beginning of the book where they’re describing her garden. It wouldn’t have been a huge deal if it didn’t take an entire chapter. I think this book had some strong potential, but it wasn’t for me. Or perhaps it just wasn’t my time for it. It wasn’t my favorite book and definitely not on my list of books I’d recommend you run out to buy and read it, but it isn’t awful either. I hate giving poor reviews so please don’t pick up this book just because I didn’t like it. We all have different tastes so this might be one that you’d like. Disclaimer: I received a copy of this book from the publisher for my honest review, which I have given. I was not required to write a positive review and have not been compensated for it in any way. All opinions expressed are my own.
LJShuck More than 1 year ago
Eleanor Gustafson is a new author for me, but she is not new to her fans. I enjoyed Unpresentable Glory very much and look forward to reading more by this author. As a matter of fact, I’ve already checked to see what else she has written. Have you ever heard of, or maybe even participated in, a garden tour? Garden tours are special tours of certain gardens in a specific neighborhood or town. Due to the expense of maintaining a garden people would want to tour, many of these types of tours are at the homes of affluential people. Such is the case for Linda Jenson, a never married, 40 something, well off heiress, who continues the passion of her predecessors. Her gardens are beautiful and well known, being maintained by a hired gardener and his crew. Linda enjoys her garden, spending many quiet moments walking or just sitting. One afternoon, having concluded her walk, Linda spies a man lying under the shrubbery. She finds that the man has passed out, however, when she is finally able to awaken him, she learns he is more sick than a simple faint. Refusing medical attention, Linda ends up getting him into her home and ensconced in her guest room. Remember, this man is a complete stranger. She cares for him until he is well enough to go to his own home, a time of 2 to 3 weeks. As healing continues, the two find they have much in common and a special connection begins to form. The stranger asks her to call him Jay; he never provides his full name nor does he provide any personal information. When he is well enough to go, he leaves. It doesn’t take long for Linda to find out who Jay really is because he is somewhat famous. She’s not much of a tv watcher, but one day she turns on the news, and there he is. When scandals erupt, Linda is somehow dragged into them. She watches from afar as the man she believes she loves is dragged through the muck of personal and professional tragedy; she promised she would never attempt to contact him or even mention his stay. She keeps that promise. Throughout the novel are special moments the author calls “unpresentable glory”, those moments where one may recognize the hand of God. Personally, I call them “God Moments”; some call them coincidences. It is a recognition of the influence of Gods grace in our lives that is quiet and unnoticeable, unless one is attuned to listen and watch. While the author weaved many moments of unpresentable glory throughout the novel, I think the best one was the very last one. I received a complimentary e-book copy of this book via Just Read Tours, and am under no obligation to write a positive review. All thoughts and opinions, therein, are solely my own.