And No More Sorrow

And No More Sorrow

by Liliane Pelzman

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Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781947940987
Publisher: seasidepress.org
Publication date: 04/10/2018
Series: Holocaust/WWII memoirs by seasidepress.org , #2
Pages: 186
Product dimensions: 5.00(w) x 8.00(h) x 0.40(d)

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And No More Sorrow 4.9 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 23 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Hello Liliane' During the war years l940-1945 I lived in Amsterdam. Reading your book 'And No More Sorrow' I am very impressed by the way you portrayed the agony that your mother endured in the Netherlands and at the various concentration camps in Germany.What a courageous lady!! During that time I lost many of my Jewish schoolfriends. Every day some of my schoolmates were 'picked up' by the Germans. and never returned home. Yes, I was there! Your book describes the horror of that time very well, a monstrous time that we can not and must not forget, something so incredible how did it ever happen? You have done a terrific job interviewing your mother, reflecting her memoirs so intensely as if you experienced it all yourself. I bought several books for my children and grandchildren in memory of my friends who died in the gas chambers at such early age. Thank you Liliane! from Julda (Joes)Joon
Guest More than 1 year ago
I have read many books about the Holocaust. This is one of the best, if not the best, because of the political info of what went on behind the scenes. I don't think this info is generally known. Very interesting!
Guest More than 1 year ago
This book demonstrates beautifully the concept of 'flowers in the pavement.' Despite the harsh, brutal conditions she faces, Sonja finds strength, hope, and love among her friends during her journey. A fantastic book, with an amazing true story! Well done!!
Guest More than 1 year ago
As a retired teacher, 'And No More Sorrow' is a must read for every 5th through 12th grader. Adults also should take note of this true story. Sonja, the main character in 'And No More Sorrow,' teaches the reader that ultimately it's friends, love and family that motivate and guide us through our most challenging moments. These are the words that come to mind: inspiring, brave and forgiving. A must read, not unlike the story of Anne Frank, who lived a few blocks from Sonja. Well done!
Guest More than 1 year ago
And No More Sorrow is a unique book, excellent book for teenagers. It's the first book I have read by a second generation writer that describes the Dutch experience in such detail in regards to the politics. And No More Sorrow gives us hope and teaches us to learn from history and to go on with a positive attitude about the future. - Sima Har-Lev, Holocaust Studies Specialist.
Guest More than 1 year ago
A wonderfully written and enlightening tale of a holocaust survivor. The world needs more books like this so people can never forget or deny what took place.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Simply stated: sad, but an awesomely inspiring story. A new perspective of the holocaust. I highly highly recommend this outstanding story.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This is a story about a daughter finding her own identity. While in the process she found she had to process her Mother's Journey into adulthood first. It began in World War II in Amsterdam when the Nazi's came to Holland intending to wipe out the Jews. It is a visual read that documents history as her Mother's life evolved. Perhaps her Mother's true romantic spirit was her survival! Fantastic read!
Guest More than 1 year ago
Dear Liliane, I want to tell you how much I relished your book. I loved the way you told the story. It took on a whole new meaning for me. Most books I've read about the Holocaust I thought what an awful time for human beings. But to read of a person that you know 'from listening to you of your Mother' took on a whole new prospective for me. I can understand why people would commit suicide not to endure the pain they all suffered. But, to hear how your Mother endured pain and suffering to be reunited with her loved one only to find out he had died must have been unbearable. I guess I have never had to go through anything like that but how people can deliberately hurt other human beings is beyond me. Your Mother is the bravest person I can think of. I hope that something like that never happens again. I can't imagine the scars your Mother has from going through that. And you are a brave soul also to have researched all of it to put into words.
Guest More than 1 year ago
A clearly written account of a horrendous period that shook mankind to the core. Written by Sonja's loving daughter as a tribute to her mother. Love conquers all.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Dear Liliane, I haven't read such a well written, concise and impressive book before. I was reading it without a stop during last night and got late to work of course. You have distilled the quintessence in your thoughts about doing this ardous work of asking and listening. Lots of work, I appreciate that you did it, also for us readers and descendants of the generation who almost or completely lost their loved ones and their own lives. So thank you very much for your astounding book which I recommended for our library in the Hospital.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Liliane, I finished your book and thought it was terrific. It is very different from other books I have read because it gives the micro and macro view. I sure do love your mom and her reslience. I only wonder if I could have survived. And I love her line that God was out riding a bike....that says it all.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Dear Lilian, Finished reading your book a few days ago, which is 'special' because my daughter and granddaughter are here from Israel, and I am SO busy with them. Finished it because I liked it so much and got so much information. I hope your inbox is full with compliments: You deserve it..........
Guest More than 1 year ago
What makes this holocaust memoir of a young Dutch woman particularly interesting and quite readable is the fact that the author, L. Pelzman, happens to be the subject's daughter. With a daughter's sensitivity, she delves into the most intimate details of her mother's life in the years prior to and after her deportation to a series of concentration camps. A well researched chronology of events woven into her mother's story is especially useful in understanding most Jews' feelings of denial and in particular, her mother's. This was a very compelling read . I especially appreciated Pelzman's personal insights of how the Holocaust continued to affect her own childhood years after the event. I read the book in two sittings, and highly recommend it.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This candid, unrelentingly honest and compelling memoir of a Dutch holocaust survivor (Sonja Kiek Rosenstein Cohen) is a remarkable page-turner¿a solid, heart-wrenching work by Mrs. Cohen¿s daughter, Liliane Pelzman, whose abilities as an international journalist shine as an intimate storyteller! A story of love, loss, pain, hope, and courage, ¿And No More Sorrow¿ reads quickly because of Pelzman¿s unfettered, visual style, which vividly and masterfully present her mother¿s experiences, memories and emotions against the historical events of the WWII period and Hitler¿s genocidal regime. ¿And No More Sorrow¿ well deserves a place in the ranks of nonfiction literature that succeeds on so many levels, at once thrilling, passionate and educational.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I like reading biographies, especially when they are instructive. This Holocaust biography is unexpectedly upbeat. Interesting is the political background interwoven with the present story. This gives you perspective. It¿s an easy read and only took me two evenings to finish. I highly recommend this book.
Guest More than 1 year ago
An intensely sad and moving story about a young woman battling through the worst of times.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This is a biography of a young Dutch Jewish woman, who at the age of 21 lost her family, her newly wedded husband and most of her relatives during the Holocaust. The young woman grew up and lived in Amsterdam when Nazi Germany invaded Holland in May of 1940. One Sunday morning in 1943, a month after her husband¿s arrest, she was caught during a razzia while walking to work. She was deported to Poland and survived four concentration camps. Her story, journey and subsequent survival are set against the social and political canvas of the times. After reading this you will never have a bad day again, the rest of your life. This is a well-written and poignant story that is instructive and interesting, equally for history and English students. For parents use this story as a tool to educate our children of today, our leaders of tomorrow.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I've finished And No More Sorrow about her mother. What can I say?! Like so many other books on the subject, it is totally compelling. Her mother must be quite a person. I'm so glad Liliane put her mother's story in print. What inspirations they are.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Very moving.
toeli7 on LibraryThing 17 days ago
story of survival and a daughter's journey to understand By N.H. - See all my reviewsThis review is from: And No More Sorrow (Paperback)What makes this holocaust memoir of a young Dutch woman particularly interesting and quite readable is the fact that the author, L. Pelzman, happens to be the subject's daughter. With a daughter's sensitivity, she delves into the most intimate details of her mother's life in the years prior to and after her deportation to a series of concentration camps. A well researched chronology of events woven into her mother's story is especially useful in understanding most Jews' feelings of denial and in particular, her mother's. This was a very compelling read . I especially appreciated Pelzman's personal insights of how the Holocaust continued to affect her own childhood years after the event. I read the book in two sittings, and highly recommend it.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
The year is 1940. The place is Amsterdam, Holland. In a Europe that is torn apart by a Nazi regime, Sonja is forced to come to grips with unbelievable losses-her husband, her family, her way of life-all by the age of eighteen. In And No More Sorrow Pelzman, Sonja's daughter, vividly and masterfully presents her mother's story against the historical events that took place during Hitler's regime. After a long period of estrangement, during which Pelzman wrestles with her mother's pain, mother and daughter reconnect and make history together. Sonja's story teaches the reader that ultimately, it is friends, love, and family that motivate and guide us through our most challenging moments. And No More Sorrow succeeds on many levels. At once thrilling, passionate, and educational, it deserves a place in the ranks of biographical literature. The cover photo and sub-title of Liliane Pelzman's powerful and poignant memoir about her mother, "And No More Sorrow, a mother, her daughter, their war" tells the reader almost everything. On the cover is a 1943 photo of Ms. Pelzman's mother, Sonja Rosenstein, 22, happily married for the past eighteen months to the love of her life, Herman Rosenstein. In the eerily beautiful and yet haunting photo, Sonja has a yellow Jewish star sewn into her sweater to identify her as a Jew, as was the law. She is uncommonly pretty, intelligent and innocent with a whole, wonderful life ahead of her in her native Holland. That is until Hitler and the Nazis inhumanely all but destroyed her physical well being and her psyche and took from her all she loved in the world, her mother, father, younger sister and beloved husband. What seems to separate this book from other Holocaust literature is how Sonja's horrific war experiences did not end with her liberation and return to Holland as an orphan with almost no surviving family. (Of the 105,000 Dutch Jews, a staggering 100,000 Jews perished, most in the infamous concentration camps and gas chambers. Almost like DNA, Sonja's living nightmare was unavoidably passed on to the next generation. But, balancing the ghastly, unimaginable horror inflicted by the Nazis, is the life affirming story of a daughter who was unable to hear her mother's war time experiences, but who, 40 years later, took nearly a decade of her life to interview her elderly mother. In so doing Ms. Pelzman tells Sonja's story in moving fashion, and is able to repair their strained relationship, unavoidably doomed by the sub-human treatment inflicted on Jews by the Nazis. She literally gets her mother back in her life. So, in addition to being a historical account of that dark period in history, amidst all the horror, Liliane Pelzman's remarkable book is one of hope that will likely inspire the reader. It certainly did in my case. -Jack Neworth - Santa Monica Daily Press
Anonymous More than 1 year ago