And You Know You Should Be Glad: A True Story of Friendship

And You Know You Should Be Glad: A True Story of Friendship

by Bob Greene

Audiobook(CD - Abridged, 4 CDs, 5 Hours)

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Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780061120718
Publisher: HarperCollins Publishers
Publication date: 05/02/2006
Edition description: Abridged, 4 CDs, 5 Hours
Product dimensions: 5.20(w) x 5.60(h) x 0.60(d)

About the Author

Award-winning journalist Bob Greene is the author of six New York Times bestsellers and a frequent contributor to the New York Times Op-Ed page.

Award-winning journalist Bob Greene is the author of six New York Times bestsellers and a frequent contributor to the New York Times Op-Ed page.

Read an Excerpt

And You Know You Should Be Glad


By Bob Greene

HarperCollins Publishers, Inc.

Copyright © 2006 Bob Greene
All right reserved.

ISBN: 0061126853

Chapter One

We walked slowly to audie murphy Hill.

It's at the corner of Ardmore and Elm -- the north edge of the small front lawn at 228 South Ardmore. He -- Jack -- used to live in that house, when we first became best friends. We were five then; we were fifty-seven now, standing next to the lawn, next to Audie Murphy Hill.

"It seemed so steep," I said to him.

"Well, we were little," he said.

This was toward the end -- there would not be many more of these walks for us, the months leading up to today had taken their toll -- but every time I came back home to see him, we made the walk. He wanted to.

The slope hardly rises at all -- it's not really a hill, at least in the eyes of grown men. But in those years when he and I first knew each other -- the years just after World War II, the years during which the fathers of the families in the town had come home from Europe and the Pacific, had bought houses on streets like this one, had started to settle back into life during peacetime -- it had felt to us like something out of Italy or North Africa. We would charge up that slope -- up that placid piece of grass on that safe Ohio street in a town where only 13,000 people lived -- and, sticks in hand, sticks standing in for rifles, we wouldpretend that we were Audie Murphy. The most decorated combat soldier of the Second World War.

"Maybe the new owners of the house leveled off the lawn," I said to him now.

"No," he said. "This is how it was. It just felt steeper."

We were still on the sidewalk. I was trying to see what was in his eyes, without him knowing I was looking. Fat chance. He always noticed everything.

"Your dad used to watch us sometimes," my oldest friend -- no longer a boy, no longer sure of anything -- said. He was getting tired. I had told his wife that we wouldn't be long. Their house was less than a mile from his parents' old house -- less than a mile from Audie Murphy Hill.

"I know," I said. "My dad would be picking me up in his car, to take me home for dinner."

Those men home from their war -- what must they have thought? It hadn't even been ten years for them, back then -- ten years earlier they had been fighting in Europe, fighting on the islands of the Pacific, and then they were here, leaning against their Fords and Buicks, waiting while their sons finished playing soldier in the dying sun.

"They were much younger than we are now," I said to Jack.

"They were in their thirties," he said.

I thought I should ask him, so I did:

"You feel like climbing up the hill?"

It wasn't a hill at all. But it was too steep. Now, near the end, just as at the beginning of our lives, at the beginning of our friendship, it was too daunting for him, at least on this day.

"Let's go back," said my oldest friend.

We started to walk -- slowly, because he was unsteady -- toward his waiting wife, toward home.

Continues...


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And You Know You Should Be Glad: A True Story of Friendship 3.3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 9 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
michelle09 More than 1 year ago
So, I debated about buying this book for a while and finally I did. I am not sure what I expected, but it turned out to be a bit of a Mitch Albom type book. You know, the kinds of books that make you want to curl up and cry, yet vow to yourself that you are going to live your life a little bit differently? That is this book. Greene writes with such truthfulness and compassion that makes you want to pick up the phone and call your childhood friends - wherever they may be. It's a good book.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I really enjoyed this book. I couldn't put it down after I started reading it. I wanted to know what happened with the friendship. It definitely is a book to read when you're going through the trials of somebody with cancer. A definite read!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Dr_Mike More than 1 year ago
A very touching true story about dying from the view of a close friend. While there are many books like this, this one is written from a man's perspective about one of his childhood male friends. It shows it is allright for men to have feelings and to share them.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Guest More than 1 year ago
touching and tedious, January 18, 2008 No doubt this is a touching book on friendship. Many times heart breaking. But, here also is the power of an author's name to sell books. The gripping story tends to make you overlook the tedious and verbose. Bob has a stunning reputation more worthy of the fast pace a suspense demands.