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Animals and Their Mates: How Animals Attract, Fight for and Protect Each Other
     

Animals and Their Mates: How Animals Attract, Fight for and Protect Each Other

by Pamela Hickman, Pat Stephens (Illustrator)
 

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Male warblers grow colorful feathers during the spring mating season. Male moose compete for a female by head-butting each other with their antlers. Female ospreys are fed and protected by their mates while they hatch their eggs. Whether it's to attract, fight for or protect a mate, animals interact in some remarkable ways. Using concise language and realistic

Overview

Male warblers grow colorful feathers during the spring mating season. Male moose compete for a female by head-butting each other with their antlers. Female ospreys are fed and protected by their mates while they hatch their eggs. Whether it's to attract, fight for or protect a mate, animals interact in some remarkable ways. Using concise language and realistic illustrations, this title in the Animal Behavior series takes a resourceful approach to exploring animal life.

Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature
For those readers who may feel a little "funny" about the whole idea of relationships between males and females (even those outside our species), fear not. Some animals think that fighting and urinating in public are perfectly acceptable ways of attracting and winning mates, rather than being rude and unacceptable acts. Male honeybees explode and die after they mate with a queen. Earthworms, snails and slugs are both male and female at the same time. This introduction to the animal mating process is tastefully written, factual without being clinical, humorous and engaging without being farcical. Some of the animals discussed in this slim yet very comprehensive book are red-sided garter snakes, orangutans, harbor seals and osprey. Gorgeous watercolor illustrations that depict the beauty of members of the animal kingdom and their environment without being artificial fill the pages. This book would make an excellent addition to a school or home library, or a gift for any nature-loving child. The author is a natural science writer who lives in Nova Scotia. Highly recommended. 2004, Kids Can Press, Ages 7 to 11.
—Cindy L. Carolan
Kirkus Reviews
This entry in a long-running series on animal behavior (Animals and Their Young, 2003; Animals Eating, 2001, etc.) suffers more from lack of organization than does its predecessors, but still offers plenty of fascinating facts. The subtitle promises more than readers get-most of the work covers the varied ways animals attract mates, from saliva balls to extra-long canine teeth. The whens and wheres of animal mating are covered pretty thoroughly, also, though never the hows-and the illustrations shy away from it, too. Animals protecting each other? Not in this. Stephen's watercolor illustrations are consistently accurate and detailed. Unfortunately the amazing diversity of animal behavior works against any sort of storyline or conclusion here. Information comes in sound bites, and the effort suffers from it. Good, maybe the best available on the subject, but not great. (Nonfiction. 8-12)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781553375456
Publisher:
Kids Can Press, Limited
Publication date:
08/28/2004
Series:
Animal Behavior Series
Pages:
40
Product dimensions:
9.00(w) x 11.00(h) x 0.95(d)
Age Range:
7 - 11 Years

Meet the Author

Pamela is an award-winning author of over 35 non-fiction nature books for children, including The Kids Canadian Nature Series, First Look at Nature Series, Animal Senses and Animals Hibernating. She lives in Canning, Nova Scotia.

Pat Stephens, mother, animal lover and artist, lives in a crowded house in Durham, Ontario. She has illustrated over 20 animal-related books for children.

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