Animals in Translation: Using the Mysteries of Autism to Decode Animal Behavior

Animals in Translation: Using the Mysteries of Autism to Decode Animal Behavior

by Temple Grandin, Catherine Johnson
4.1 58

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Animals in Translation 4.1 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 58 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I knew about Temple Grandin, but I had never seen her or her books. Then I read this. It was really eye-opening for me. There was not a single page that didn't teach me something new, which is a very rare event for me. Heck, I read 'A Brief History of Time' and didn't learn as much as I have reading this. For everything I've read about autism (and experienced), I still received new insights into the good and bad involved (as well as the strange, like opiates), as well as theories behind it. Then, of course, is the stuff about animals. Now THAT was eye-opening. There was so much about how animals think and behave that I never would have even thought of thinking of (probably inattentional blindness). But it all makes sense. It has made me better able to understand animals, which is vital for people to know nowadays, now that we rely on machines more and animals less. But in fact, it's at least partially repaired my relationship with my cat, who would generally avoid me and my bear-hugs. Now I pet her and understand her and the way she works better, so I can work with her instead of against her. There's just so much to learn in this book that I don't think you even should be allowed to have animals without this book. Oh, and by the way, death is an inherent part of life. Death happens all the time. Just because we cause it (in the times that we do) doesn't make it any more wrong. As much as people argue that breeding animals to eat them is unnatural, humans have been doing it for centuries. And anyways, it'd be impossible to not do anything to any animals. We are a part of their world just as much as they are part of ours. The best we can do is to change what we can, and help them with what we cannot change. More animals live when we love and understand them than if we we stop breeding them or release them into the wild. The difference between you and Temple Grandin is not that she assists brutal murders of animals and you don't. It's just that she does the little things to change our and their world for the better, and you don't. Sorry if that's a little harsh, but Temple Grandin is a visionary among animal researchers, and if you're too stubborn to read how to better communicate and co-exist with animals, then you obviously don't care about animals as much you think.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This book is packed with information and provides a new window on ourselves as well as the world of animals. One of the most unusual and compelling books I have read.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Temple Grandin's book "Animals in Translation" is highly enlightening to any pet or animal owner. The book reads as an authoritative text, quoting studies and research. For the light reader it may be overwhelming, but for a person looking to truly understand their pet or the animals they manage it's a MUST READ. A truly extraordinary lady, Temple's insight and life's work benefit us all and "Animals in Translation" is an excellent addition to the animal lover's library.
dancer2 More than 1 year ago
Having a grandchild diagnosed with autism, I was curious to see what the author had to say regarding the similarities that she found between autistics and animals. Uncharacteristically, I found her empathetic and compassionate and enormously inciteful. I would recommend this book to anyone who has a curiosity in the dynamics of animal behavior but especially, how a woman such as Temple has overcome and succeeded so profoundly in her field of journalism. It was a fascinating read.
marjo More than 1 year ago
Temple Grandin, through her own autism, reveals extraordinary personal insight into the thoughts and responses of animals . . . and of humans. Based on credible scientific research, but easy to read and understand. If you've ever felt a special connection to animals, this book will enhance that relationship. If not, it's likely to change the way you see and relate to animals in the future.
Guest More than 1 year ago
As an animal trainer I would highly recommend this book. I just found it very interesting. Each time I re-read it, I learn more. Temple Grandin has done her research and has a wealth of knowledge to share. She understands animals in a way few others can.
Guest More than 1 year ago
For those who were born onto the Autism Spectrum or is related to someone who was, Dr. Temple Grandin tells it like it is from our perspective. If your boss is on the spectrum, it should be required reading.
Guest More than 1 year ago
For the true animal lover/healer this book leaves out something that's needed most...mutual respect and compassion for EVERY animal. She tends to talk to much about how to better the ability to get cattle around within the boundries of the slaughter fields that they are made to live in. What's compassionate about that? I agree, everyone interested in healing animals needs to read this book, and then move on from it and find another way to create an actual world where all animals are loved and cared for. I respect her for her own journey it's just not how so many animal care workers feel.
StevenJ More than 1 year ago
Temple Grandin gives us her unique perspective on what may be going on the mind our dogs. For me, Dr. Grandin stands on a very short list of authors giving us some scientific insight into dog psychology. I've had dogs all my life, but have recently become involved in the rescue of breeder dogs (with Delaware Valley Golden Retriever Rescue - www.dvgrr.org). These dogs have been neglected and abused for their entire lives and present us with the challenge of helping them to become "normal" dogs. Dr. Grandin's concept that animals (and autistics) "think in pictures" is difficult to comprehend, yet goes a long way in getting me out of my word-based thought process when dealing with unusual or unwanted behaviors. Trying to see the world through the eyes of a dog makes me appreciate just how amazing our relationship with them is! This is a must read for all serious animal lovers.
chrisps More than 1 year ago
The insights into animal behavior that Dr. Grandin gives in this book have been invaluable to my career as a dog trainer, pet behavior counselor and an educator. In all of my obedience classes, I reference Animals in Translation and explain how animals think in pictures. This concept helps people to better understand their dogs, and to troubleshoot and find resolutions to behavior problems leading to a better relationship. This book has become my bible and serves as an inspiration that I can accomplish my dreams just as Dr. Grandin has overcome so much in her life of challenges to help the animals.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I've been very involved with animals and cruelty cases for the last 10 years and this book has given me a new insight as to how the animal brain works. It makes so much more sense to me now as to why animals do the things they do. It's alot to "wrap your head around" parden the pun, but is very interesting. As far as the "killing of cattle", that's a fact of life and has been for years. It's not a matter of compassion.
Guest More than 1 year ago
If there ever was an agenda-free author that tells it straight, it is Temple Grandin. Simple insights into both human and animal behavior are laid out in great detail, and I've been able to gain invaluable knowledge about the wiring and workings of my autistic niece and relate them to my own experience. I've read how other reviewers have carried their own biases to the reading and denounce the author for her work with the livestock industry. However, there can be no doubt that Temple Grandin's influence has greatly reduced animal pain, fear and suffering.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This book was recommended by Costco book reviewer. I found it absolutely fascinating! A guide in understanding animals and humans...much can be put to practical use. Our new puppy, Sir Rufus II will benefit from my having read this book!
Guest More than 1 year ago
It's not just sad, but tragic, that as we mature we lose the instinctive gift of communicating with animals we have as children. Temple's book returns us to that extraordinary ability. Amazingly readable, considering some of the hard-to-get-your-neocortex-around concepts presented, this book holds startling insights on every page. A lifetime of working with animals, both as passion and as profession, didn't teach me what 'Animals in Translation' did, and already I've employed several of her principles in working with animals (including humans). This should be mandatory reading for anyone who lives or works among, with, or near animals. Temple and Catherine, thanks for the tremendous gift you've just given us -- and our animals.
Guest More than 1 year ago
What a great book for animal lovers and people lovers! Written in a simple style, yet it is so unique and compelling. Author's observations of animals - especially dogs - are incredibly humane and meticulous. And so correct! I have two dogs and this book has just assured me I was right about them ¿ they do have feelings and they know more than we realize. Dogs do make us human.
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janet52 More than 1 year ago
I just finished this amazing book & plan to read it again. It is PACKED with information & Ms Grandin's insights, ideas & opinions. You don't have to agree with all of those opinions but you will agree the information she offers is fantastic. Gives me an open-eyed look at our fellow beings. If you are a dog owner/lover you already have a feeling there is a lot more going on than we humans can perceive. This book confirms that.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
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Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Temple Grandin's insightful explanation of how animals think is an absolute must for anyone who interacts in any way with animals.
The_hibernators More than 1 year ago
In Animals in Translation, Temple Grandin describes how her autism helps her discover how animals perceive the world. She compares an autistic person’s perceptions with animals’ perceptions, and contrasts them with how non-autistic people think. She also gives her own ideas about how domesticated animals can be treated/trained in order to provide them with the best environment possible. Overall, a very interesting book...It changed my perception of how autistic people and animals think.
Cliverj More than 1 year ago
Temple Grandin was profiled in a BBC Horizon documentary a year or two back as `the woman who thinks like a cow'. A somewhat uncomplimentary portrayal you might think, until you appreciate that Grandin is a gifted professor of animal science and champion for autism, and that cows are far more interesting creatures than might often be assumed. Grandin discovered that her way of viewing the world corresponded very closely to the perceptions of many animals. As a trouble-shooter on farms and ranches across the USA, she found that she could very often just `see' the problems which were scaring cattle and bringing their owners to the brink of despair. Combined with her prolific research and writings, autism has been a rare gift, enabling her remarkable work. As a novice in the field of animal science, I felt fascinated and challenged by the wide mix of ideas this book presents. Topics as diverse as why pigs enjoy snuggling up to each other and genetic aggression are introduced in easy, layman's terms, giving interesting details about the research but also recognising that scientists don't yet have all the answers. Grandin challenges us to question a lot of what we might believe about animal behaviour - and for that matter autism - and does so with humility and humour. A wealth of down-to-earth anecdotes ground the research and open questions posed. For example, we learn about a friend's cat who knew when `mother' was entering the lift of their apartment block some 12 floors below and of the prairie dogs of Arizona who've not only evolved a language involving nouns, verbs and adjectives, but even different dialects amongst local colonies! At the same time, familiar stories are looked at a new light. For example, the story of the German `counting' horse Clever Hans is looked at not as a disappointing scam (it was revealed that Hans couldn't really count), but remarkable for the fact that a horse had taught himself to tune into subtle human cues in the first place. This is just one example of what is often unseen `animal genius'. Grandin appeals for humane treatment of all animals, which she argues must come through a new understanding of how they interact with their world and how we deal with our husbandry of them. The joint writing with Catherine Johnson works well, coming across as a conversation between friends (including the reader). But what is remarkable is that Grandin and Johnson manage to present deep insights into both autism and animal communication, as well as linking the two together. Rarely does a book inspire us to think both about the animals around us and our fellow human beings in a new way. This is a truly wonderful book, and one which I have found myself constantly wanting to recommend to others.
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