Anne of Green Gables (Anne of Green Gables Series #1)

Anne of Green Gables (Anne of Green Gables Series #1)

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Overview

Anne of Green Gables (Anne of Green Gables Series #1) by L. M. Montgomery

As soon as Anne Shirley arrives at the snug white farmhouse called Green Gables, she is sure she wants to stay forever...but will the Cuthberts send her back to the orphanage? Anne knows she's not what they expected-a skinny girl with fiery red hair and a temper to match. If only she can convince them to let her stay, she'll try very hard not to keep rushing headlong into scrapes and blurting out the first thing that comes to her mind. Anne is not like anybody else, the Cuthberts agree; she is special-a girl with an enormous imagination. This orphan girl dreams of the day when she can call herself Anne of Green Gables.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780439295772
Publisher: Scholastic, Inc.
Publication date: 08/28/2002
Series: Anne of Green Gables Series
Edition description: REV
Pages: 400
Product dimensions: 4.20(w) x 6.82(h) x 1.05(d)
Age Range: 8 - 12 Years

About the Author

L. M. Montgomery was born in 1874 on Prince Edward Island in Canada, the setting of nineteen of her twenty novels. She died in Toronto in 1942.

Read an Excerpt

This Dark World

The infant was taken, within a week of its birth, to the precincts of the church; the child of wrath must be reformed into the image of God, 'the servant of the fiend' made into 'a son of joy'. At the church-door the priest asked the midwife if the child were male or female, and then made a sign of the cross on the infant's forehead, breast and right hand. He placed some salt in the baby's mouth according to custom; then the priest exorcised the devil from its body with a number of prayers, and pronounced baptism as the sole means 'to obtain eternal grace by spiritual regeneration'. The priest spat in his left hand and touched the ears and nose of the child with his saliva. Let the nose be open to the odour of sweetness. It was time to enter the church itself, the priest taking the right hand of the new-born child who had with the salt and saliva been granted the station of a catechumen.

The litanies of the saints were pronounced over the baptismal font; the priest then divided the water with his right hand and cast it in the four directions of the cross. He breathed three rimes upon it and then spilled wax in a cruciform pattern. He divided the holy water with a candle, before returning the taper to the cleric beside him. Oil and chrism were added, with a long rod or spoon, and the child could now be baptised. Thomas More, what seekest thou? The sponsors replied for the infant, Baptism. Dost thou wish to be baptised? I wish. The child was given to the priest, who immersed him three times in the water. He was then anointed with chrism and wrapped in a chrismal robe. Thomas More, receive a white robe, holy and unstained, which thou must bring beforethe tribunal of Our Lord Jesus Christ, that thou mayest have eternal life and live for ever and ever. The candle was lit and placed in the child's right hand, thus inaugurating a journey through this dark world which ended when, during the last rites, a candle was placed in the right hand of the dying man with the prayer, 'The Lord is my Light and my Salvation, whom shall I fear?' Whom shall this particular child fear, when it was believed by the Church that the whole truth and meaning of baptism was achieved in the act of martyrdom? 'Baptism and suffering for the sake of Christ', according to a second-century bishop, are the two acts which bring full 'remission of sins'.

It was considered best to baptise the child on the same day as its birth, if such haste were practicable, since an infant unbaptised would be consigned to limbo after its death. To leave this world in a state of original sin was to take a course to that eternal dwelling, Limbus puerorum, suspended between heaven, hell and purgatory. There the little unbaptised souls would dwell in happy ignorance beside the more formidable and haunting Limbus patrum, which contained the souls of Noah, Moses and Isaiah together with (in Dante's epic) Virgil, Aristotle, Socrates and all the good men who lived on earth before the birth, death and resurrection of Jesus. Adam had already been dragged from this place at the time of Christ's crucifixion, but there was continual debate within the Church about the consequences of denying new-born children the eternal comfort of paradise. Could a child be saved by the desire, the votum, of its parents? Thomas More himself would eventually concede only that 'those infantes be dampned onely to the payne of losse of heauen'.

In various late medieval pictures of baptism, in manuscripts and devotional manuals, the priest stands with his surplice and stole beside the font. Sometimes he seems to be balancing the infant in the palm of his hand, yet the child is so unnaturally large and alert for such an early stage in its life that we can only assume it acquired mental consciousness with its spiritual renovation. A clerk with a surplice stands behind the priest, while two sponsors and the child's father are generally seen beside the font. In some depictions of this first of the seven sacraments, an image of the dying Christ hangs behind the human scene. But the mother was rarely, if ever, present.

In the more pious households, she would have worn a girdle made out of manuscript prayer rolls in the last stages of her pregnancy, and it was customary in labour to invoke the name of St Margaret as well as the Blessed Virgin. She remained secluded after giving birth, and two or three weeks later was led out to be 'churched' or purified. When she was taken to the church, her head was covered by a handkerchief, as a veil, and she was advised not to look up at the sun or the sky. She knelt in the church while the priest blessed her and assured her, in the words of Psalm 121, that 'the sun shall not burn her by day, nor the moon by night. It was a ceremony both to celebrate the birth of the child and to give thanks for the survival of the mother. This is the late fifteenth-century world into which Thomas More was baptised.

Table of Contents

What People are Saying About This

From the Publisher

"Aficionados of the auburn-tressed waif will find Anne of Green Gables lavishly illustrated."
Smithsonian Magazine

Alfred Breit

Lawrence was concerned with one end: to reveal how love, how a relationship between a man and a woman can be most touching and beautiful, but only if it is unihibited and total.

Mark Twain

The dearest and most lovable child in fiction.

Reading Group Guide

1.  The critic Julian Moynahan argues that “Lady Chatterley’s Lover dramatizes two opposed orientations toward life, two distinct modes of human awareness, the one abstract, cerebral, and unvital; the other concrete, physical, and organic.” Discuss.

2.  What is the role of the manor house, the industrial village, and the wood in the novel?

3.  Many critics have argued that while Lady Chatterley’s Lover represents a daring treatment of sexuality, it is an inferior work of art, though other critics have called it a novel of the first rank. (“Lady Chatterley’s Lover, ” F. R. Leavis writes, “is a bad novel, ” while Anaïs Nin, on the other hand, describes it as “artistically . . . [Lawrence’s] best novel.”) What do you think?

4.  In “Apropos of Lady Chatterley’s Lover” (a defense of the book that he published in 1930), Lawrence wrote that “the greatest need of man is the renewal forever of the complete rhythm of life and death, the rhythm of the sun’s year, the body’s year of a lifetime, and the greater year of the stars, the soul’s year of immortality.” How is the theme of resurrection played out in the novel?

5.  From the time it was banned from unexpurgated publication in the United States and Britain until the trials in the late 1950s and early 1960s that resulted in the lifting of the ban, and even more recently, critics have argued over whether Lady Chatterley’s Lover is obscene and vulgar. Lawrence argues in “Apropos of Lady Chatterley’s Lover”that “we shall never free the phallic reality [i. e., sex] . . . till we give it its own phallic language and use the obscene words”; his goal was to purify these words. Critics have disagreed as to whether he succeeded in this goal; Richard Aldington notes, for example, that the words are “incrusted with nastiness” and “cannot regain their purity” and Graham Hough argues that “the fact remains that the connotations of the obscene physical words are either facetious or vulgar.” Do you think the novel is obscene or vulgar, or do you think Lawrence succeeds in his mission?

6.  “The essential function of art is moral, ” Lawrence once wrote. “Not aesthetic, not decorative, not pastime and recreation. But moral.” Do you think this proposition informs the shape, structure, and meaning of Lady Chatterley’s Lover, and if so, how?

7.  Critics have often complained that one of Lawrence’s weaknesses as a novelist is his characterization. So John Middleton Murry writes of Sons and Lovers that “we can discern no individuality whatever in the denizens of Mr. Lawrence’s world. We should have thought that we should have been able to distinguish between male and female at least. But no! Remove the names, remove the sedulous catalogues of unnecessary clothing . . . and man and woman are as indistinguishable as octopods in an aquarium tank.” And Edwin Muir comments generally that “we remember the scenes in his novels; we forget the names of his men and women. We should not know any of them if we met them in the street.” Do you think this applies in the case of Lady Chatterley’s Lover? If so, do you think it is a fault or a virtue?

8.  How does nature imagery function in the novel?

Customer Reviews

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Anne of Green Gables 4.3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 354 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This book is so imaginative and original. It is beautiful. The entire series is echanting.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
NEVER FEAR! THIS BOOK IS THE ORIGINAL VERSION. THE PERSON WHO SAID IT WAS A SHORTENED VERSION POSTED THE SAME COMMENT ON MANY OTHER ANNE OF GREEN GABLES BOOKS. I BOUGHT THIS BOOK, SO I'D KNOW IF ITS REAL OR NOT, AND, LET ME ASSURE YOU, IT IS.
Amy Barlow More than 1 year ago
I read this as a child so I was excited to be able to download it for free. But due to all of the errors in translating to electronic format I was nit able to really enjoy it. I spent more time trying to figure out what words were supposed to be there than just relaxing and enjoying the story. I will have to get a hard copy from my library. Too bad the electronic copy was not reviwed prior to publishing as many people will probably get frustrated before the story is done and move on to something else. Regardless of the errors I love this story and look forward to getting it from my local library as i suggest anyone interested in reading this story to do.
Headina_Book More than 1 year ago
I didn't notice that this was an abridged version (audio mp3) when I ordered it. But I wasn't too concerned until I started listening to it. Being a die hard Anne of Green Gables fan I was extremely disappointed that their idea of shortening the story was to completely cut out key events and rewrite new contrived events that fall flat and do not lend themselves to the dramatic, touching, sometimes comical life of Anne Shirley. That coupled with the squeaky mouse-like voice that the narrator uses for Anne, and I will be searching for a new audio book for Anne of Green Gables to replace this one. This is NOT Lucy Maude Montgomery's Anne of Green Gables...fans be forewarned!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I would give it more stars if i posiibly could
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Love this series. My mother read them, my daughter and now my granddaughters. These are wonderful books for little girls. Recommend highly for all young girls.
Isabella Parker More than 1 year ago
this book is amazing for the price. very few typos very clearly written. soooooooooooooooooooooo cool!!!!!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I had forgotten how wonderfully enchanting this timeless story was...and is. I first read Anne of Green Gables at the age of 11 now, over 50 years later I still am captivated by the little orphan girl Anne and her adventures on Prince Edward Island. This book carries you back in time to when children lived by their imagination, friendships were lifelong and family came first. Take a day off the computer, no texts or emails, no cell phone distraction and follow the mishaps and charm of this story...I think you'll find yourself wishing you could see the world as it once was. Jp
TechnoBookWorm More than 1 year ago
My 7 year old loved it. She read it in one day, all by herself. She went back and read it again. I would recommend the Classic Start Series for all young children.
Lindell Huskey More than 1 year ago
few typos. easy to read. good book.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anne Of Green Gables is a wonderful and amusing book. Anne is a little red-headed girl who comes to live with Marilla and Matthew Cuthbert from the orphanage. It turns out thoughh that they wanted a boy to help Matthew, who is gettinng on in years on the farm. So Marilla prepares to take Anne back to the orphanage, but Matthew has grown to love Anne and begs Marilla to keep Anne
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I finally decided to read this classic story and I was not disappointed. Anne is a forceful spirit, if somewhat exhausting at times. This is a wholesome story that left me wishing that I possessed Anne's indomitable spirit, imagination, and ability to make friends.
Bookworm1FG More than 1 year ago
I purchased this book as a gift for my daughter who had read it as a young person. She was thrilled. Bookworm1FG
mgoodrich718 More than 1 year ago
Anne Of Green Gables By L.M. Montgomery<br /> <br /> 3 Stars<br /> <br /> Anne comes to Avonlea to be adopted by Marilla and Matthew Cuthbert. She is not however what they were expecting. They wanted a boy and she is an outspoken red-headed girl. She wins the Cuthberts over though and they agree to keep her if she minds her manners and can be molded into what they consider a respectable little girl. Anne learns a lot during her time in Avonlea. She goes through many trials during her fight to be accepted by the community. She finally makes a friend in Diana who is her very first true friend. That even goes awry for awhile because Anne's outspoken ways are often misunderstood. This novel tells the struggle of Anne through her becoming a woman.<br /> This is a truly delightful story. Good small town drama. I found myself completely relating to Anne through many of her trials. One being her inability to be seen and not heard even when it was something that was completely against what she believed in. It was also amusing reading how people viewed her red hair or anyone that had it. Not that it's much different now but it was much worse back then. I loved living in Anne's world for a little while.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I'm thirteen and I totally agree. I have even read Les Miserables (unabridged) so to me Twilight is just plain stupid.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I love this book. I also love the movie! For the movie it is almost exactly like the book exept a couple parts taken out and put into into. They are both really good. My favorite character is Gilbert then its Anne. This is an injoyable book to read and to watch.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Awesome book , theres alot of typos and realy easy too read .i totaly recamend it for any age !
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This is a good book
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Find out in Anne of Green Gables! This book is a wonderful classic that has enthralled readers for many generations with its compelling plot, well developed characters, vivid writing, and emotions. After reading this book, you will want to sprint to your local library for the next book in the series.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Love the book.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Yall need to learn to enjoy the clasics and not rely on those stupidbooks on vampires and zombies and all this twilight crap im 11 and like the clasics
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Whoever typed this did a horrid job. About 35 pages in the text is so misconstrued that is not understandable. No wonder its free
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
So many typos! The title of the book as well as the titles of chapters appear in the middle of pages. My free Kindle copy was much better!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This is a wonderful book. I've read this over and over throughout my life, and enjoy it the more I read it. By the way, this is a very nice version of this book and doesn't have lots of typos and is not abridged. For some reason all the reviews are for different versions of this book, not this one only.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
A great story and lovely charm; my granddaughter really liked this!