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Anne of Green Gables
     

Anne of Green Gables

4.3 459
by Lucy Maud Montgomery
 

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As soon as Anne Shirley arrives at the snug white farmhouse called Green Gables, she is sure she wants to stay forever...but will the Cuthberts send her back to the orphanage? Anne knows she's not what they expected-a skinny girl with fiery red hair and a temper to match. If only she can convince them to let her stay, she'll try very hard not to keep rushing headlong

Overview

As soon as Anne Shirley arrives at the snug white farmhouse called Green Gables, she is sure she wants to stay forever...but will the Cuthberts send her back to the orphanage? Anne knows she's not what they expected-a skinny girl with fiery red hair and a temper to match. If only she can convince them to let her stay, she'll try very hard not to keep rushing headlong into scrapes and blurting out the first thing that comes to her mind. Anne is not like anybody else, the Cuthberts agree; she is special-a girl with an enormous imagination. This orphan girl dreams of the day when she can call herself Anne of Green Gables.

Editorial Reviews

bn.com
In The Life of Thomas More, acclaimed author Peter Ackroyd tackles the familiar story of the man for all seasons and manages to shed new light on a life that has been the focus of scholars and historians for more than four centuries.
barnesandnoble.com
When mischievous orphan Anne Shirley arrives at the Cuthbert farm Green Gables, she knows she wants to stay forever. But the Cuthbert's were expecting a boy orphan -- someone strong enough to help with their farmwork. Can spunky Anne win their hearts? This beautiful picture book adaptation of L. M. Montgomery's classic novel will delight the author's many fans -- and captivate a new audience of younger readers.
Andrew Sullivan
This is the first biography of More to have absorbed the small revolution in Reformation scholarship of the last 20 years...and is able to see England, through the mists of Protestant and Whig propaganda, as one of the most authentically Cahtolic countries in the history of Europe. -- The New York Times Book Review
Publishers Weekly
This simplified picture-book retelling of how the 11-year-old orphan comes to Prince Edward Island is adapted from L.M. Montgomery's classic. Ages 5-8. (Apr.) Copyright 2003 Reed Business Information.
Library Journal
Montgomery is the latest author to join Running Press's ongoing "Courage Classics'' series of budget hardcover reprints of classic works. Along with the full text, this edition includes excerpts from the author's journal. Also new in the line is Short Stories and Tall Tales by Mark Twain ( ISBN 1-56138-323-6 ), which offers pieces gleaned from Running Press's The Unabridged Mark Twain . At this bargain price, both titles are excellent choices.
School Library Journal
Gr 5-8-The nostalgic charm of Avonlea comes alive in Lucy Maud Montgomery's heart-warming tale set on the quaint island of Prince William about an aging brother and sister, Mathew and Marilla Cuthbert, and their decision to adopt a young boy to help with chores around their farm. However, as the result of a misunderstanding the boy turns out to be a feisty, independent, and wildly imaginative redheaded girl named Anne. Marilla's first reaction to this news is, "What use is she to us?" Wherein Mathew replies, "We might be of some use to her." Throughout this moving story these two statements mix and meld together so richly and completely that they become one truth. Three lives are changed so dramatically that none can imagine life without the others. Each new day brings a new set of adventures, often hilarious and always uplifting. Anne's vivid and overactive imagination is the cause of many mishaps, but her saving grace is her heart of gold. Her best friend and "kindred spirit," Diana, and her handsome admirer, Gilbert Blythe, often find themselves unintentional victims of Anne's escapades. Narrator Shelly Frasier's pleasant voice is especially enjoyable during the rapid ramblings of Anne and as the soft-spoken, slow-paced Mathew. Her voice reflects the human qualities of each character, switching seamlessly between broken and despaired, curt and crisp, or dreamy and absent-minded. This perennial classic, divided into convenient three minute tracks and containing a short biography of the author, is a must have for expanding audiobook collections.-Cheryl Preisendorfer, Twinsburg High School, OH Copyright 2004 Reed Business Information.
The New Yorker
This superb biography does more than narrate the life of the Lord Chancellor who was beheaded and later canonized for refusing to accept Henry VIII as head of the church. It describes the London More knew, the ferment of humanism to which he contributed, and the contemporary appeal of Catholicism. It also portrays an archetypal zealot: More denied heretics their rights of conscience, but later pleaded his own conscience without ever glimpsing the parallel between himself and the Protestants he had executed.
Time Magazine
Brilliantly conceived.
The Wall Street Journal
Sensitive [and] well-informed.
The Boston Globe
Wonderfully vivid.
Time
Brilliantly conceived....Ackroyd's vividly human More is...imperfect yet inspiring.
Kirkus Reviews
A vividly evocative portrait of the lawyer and statesman who was 'the King's good servant, but God's first,' from award- winning biographer and novelist Ackroyd (Blake, 1996; T.S. Eliot, 1984). Thomas More was born in 1479 in Milk Street, in what is now the center of London's financial district, to Agnes and John More, a tradesman-turned-lawyer. Thomas would be one of the great intellects of his time, and Ackroyd gives particular attention to young More's rare and prolonged education: his apprenticeship at the court of the learned Archbishop and Chancellor John Morton of Canterbury, his grounding in the liberal arts at Oxford University, and his legal education at New Inn and Lincoln's Inn. More's upbringing and education, Ackroyd shows, left their permanent imprint upon him: His extensive training in dialectical logic served him well at the bar and on the bench, his time with Archbishop Morton made him familiar with the world of prelates and statecraft, and his Latin and literary training fitted him for his career as a humanist. Ackroyd vibrantly evokes the devout London in which More lived, where even successful lawyers meditated on life's transience and participated in endless rounds of prayer and ritual. He also gives an intimate picture of More's affectionate relations with his family and tells the familiar story of More's rise to favor in the court of Henry VIII, his friendship with Erasmus, his tenure as lord chancellor, and his fall from grace as the crisis of the king's divorce of Catherine of Aragon worsened. Ultimately, More's constancy to his church outweighed his obeisance to the king: Ackroyd gives what amounts to a transcript of the trial in whichMore refused to endorse Henry's marriage to Anne Boleyn, and narrates his imprisonment in the Tower of London and execution in 1535. A limpidly written and superbly wrought portrait of a complex hero who was truly, as his friend Erasmus stated, 'omnium horarum homo,' a 'man for all seasons.'

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781495491092
Publisher:
CreateSpace Publishing
Publication date:
02/09/2014
Pages:
166
Product dimensions:
6.00(w) x 9.00(h) x 0.35(d)
Age Range:
1 - 17 Years

Read an Excerpt

Daring was the fashionable amusement among the Avonlea small fry just then. It had begun among the boys, but soon spread to the girls, and all the silly things that were done in Avonlea that summer because the doers thereof were “dared” to do them would fill a book by themselves. . . .

Now, to “walk” board fences requires more skill and steadiness of head and heel than one might suppose who has never tried it. But Josie Pye, if deficient in some qualities that make for popularity, had at least a natural and inborn gift, duly cultivated, for walking board fences. Josie walked the Barry fence with an airy unconcern which seemed to imply that a little thing like that wasn’t worth a “dare.” Reluctant admiration greeted her exploit, for most of the other girls could appreciate it, having suffered many things themselves in their efforts to walk fences. Josie descended from her perch, flushed with victory, and darted a defiant glance at Anne.

Anne tossed her red braids.

“I don’t think it’s such a very wonderful thing to walk a little, low, board fence,” she said. “I knew a girl in Marysville who could walk the ridge-pole of a roof.”

“I don’t believe it,” said Josie flatly. “I don’t believe anybody could walk a ridge-pole. You couldn’t, anyhow.”

“Couldn’t I?” cried Anne rashly.

“Then I dare you to do it,” said Josie defiantly. “I dare you to climb up there and walk the ridge-pole of Mr. Barry’s kitchen roof.”

Anne turned pale, but there was clearly only one thing tobe done. She walked towards the house, where a ladder was leaning against the kitchen roof. All the fifth-class girls said, “Oh!” partly in excitement, partly in dismay.

“Don’t you do it, Anne,” entreated Diana. “You’ll fall off and be killed. Never mind Josie Pye. It isn’t fair to dare anybody to do anything so dangerous.”

“I must do it. My honour is at stake,” said Anne solemnly. “I shall walk that ridge-pole, Diana, or perish in the attempt. If I am killed you are to have my pearl bead ring.”

Anne climbed the ladder amid breathless silence, gained the ridge-pole, balanced herself uprightly on that precarious footing, and started to walk along it, dizzily conscious that she was uncomfortably high up in the world and that walking ridge-poles was not a thing in which your imagination helped you out much. Nevertheless, she managed to take several steps before the catastrophe came. Then she swayed, lost her balance, stumbled, staggered and fell, sliding down over the sun-baked roof and crashing off it through the tangle of Virginia creeper beneath — all before the dismayed circle below could give a simultaneous, terrified shriek.

If Anne had tumbled off the roof on the side up which she ascended Diana would probably have fallen heir to the pearl bead ring then and there. Fortunately she fell on the other side, where the roof extended down over the porch so nearly to the ground that a fall therefrom was a much less serious thing.

Nevertheless, when Diana and the other girls had rushed frantically around the house — except Ruby Gillis, who remained as if rooted to the ground and went into hysterics — they found Anne lying all white and limp among the wreck and ruin of the Virginia creeper.

“Anne, are you killed?” shrieked Diana, throwing herself on her knees beside her friend. “Oh, Anne, dear Anne, speak just one word to me and tell me if you’re killed.”

To the immense relief of all the girls, and especially of Josie Pye, who, in spite of lack of imagination, had been seized with horrible visions of a future branded as the girl who was the cause of Anne Shirley’s early and tragic death, Anne sat dizzily up and answered uncertainly:

“No, Diana, I am not killed, but I think I am rendered unconscious.”

What People are Saying About This

Alfred Breit
Lawrence was concerned with one end: to reveal how love, how a relationship between a man and a woman can be most touching and beautiful, but only if it is unihibited and total.
Mark Twain
The dearest and most lovable child in fiction.

Meet the Author

Lucy Maud Montgomery was born on Prince Edward Island, Canada, in 1874 and raised by her maternal grandparents following her mother's death. Biographical accounts of her upbringing suggest a strict and rather lonely childhood. She later spent a number of years working as a teacher before turning to journalism and then, ultimately, to writing fiction. Anne of Green Gables, published in 1908, was her first novel and has remained in print the world over ever since. Montgomery died in Toronto in 1942.

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Anne of Green Gables 4.3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 459 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This book is so imaginative and original. It is beautiful. The entire series is echanting.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
NEVER FEAR! THIS BOOK IS THE ORIGINAL VERSION. THE PERSON WHO SAID IT WAS A SHORTENED VERSION POSTED THE SAME COMMENT ON MANY OTHER ANNE OF GREEN GABLES BOOKS. I BOUGHT THIS BOOK, SO I'D KNOW IF ITS REAL OR NOT, AND, LET ME ASSURE YOU, IT IS.
CassidyR More than 1 year ago
Anne of Green Gables is a novel by Lucy Maud Montgomery. It is titled Anne of Green Gables because it follows the adventures of a mischievous girl, Anne Shirley, who lives in Green Gables. The story takes place in the 1890's and follows Anne through several years of her life. Marilla and Matthew Cuthbert had decided to adopt a boy to help on the farm. Instead the orphanage sent a talkative and troublesome girl. They were going to send her back, but quickly came to love Anne and decided to adopt her. The major conflict of the story is Marilla's trouble raising Anne, the protagonist. The rising action involves Anne's imagination, which always provokes her to do foolish things. In addition, Gilbert Blythe (the antagonist) provokes Anne. There never is a true turning point in the book. Anne promises to behave after each incident, but once again finds trouble. The resolution is made when Matthew, her adopted father, dies. Anne promises Matthew she'll behave just before he passes away. The characters and the plot in the book were very well developed and believable. The writing in Anne of Green Gables was vividly descriptive. Anne always liked to imagine things, and often times the book would describe in detail what she dreamed of. The dialogue used was 3rd person. One of my favorite passages was, "Pretty? Oh pretty doesn't seem to be the right word. Nor beautiful, either. They don't go far enough. Oh, it was wonderful- wonderful. It is the first thing I saw that couldn't be improved by imagination." The theme of Anne of Green Gables would be imagination can make the rainiest days bright. The author is trying to say that imagination can lift you through troubled times. I really liked the book Anne of Green Gables. It was very entertaining and I would suggest it to all.
Amy Barlow More than 1 year ago
I read this as a child so I was excited to be able to download it for free. But due to all of the errors in translating to electronic format I was nit able to really enjoy it. I spent more time trying to figure out what words were supposed to be there than just relaxing and enjoying the story. I will have to get a hard copy from my library. Too bad the electronic copy was not reviwed prior to publishing as many people will probably get frustrated before the story is done and move on to something else. Regardless of the errors I love this story and look forward to getting it from my local library as i suggest anyone interested in reading this story to do.
Headina_Book More than 1 year ago
I didn't notice that this was an abridged version (audio mp3) when I ordered it. But I wasn't too concerned until I started listening to it. Being a die hard Anne of Green Gables fan I was extremely disappointed that their idea of shortening the story was to completely cut out key events and rewrite new contrived events that fall flat and do not lend themselves to the dramatic, touching, sometimes comical life of Anne Shirley. That coupled with the squeaky mouse-like voice that the narrator uses for Anne, and I will be searching for a new audio book for Anne of Green Gables to replace this one. This is NOT Lucy Maude Montgomery's Anne of Green Gables...fans be forewarned!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I would give it more stars if i posiibly could
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Love this series. My mother read them, my daughter and now my granddaughters. These are wonderful books for little girls. Recommend highly for all young girls.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I really had fun to read this book. This book refreshed my brain from the real world.
Isabella Parker More than 1 year ago
this book is amazing for the price. very few typos very clearly written. soooooooooooooooooooooo cool!!!!!
FunBookWorm11 More than 1 year ago
Anne of Green Gables: Book Review "I'll try and do anything and be anything you want, if you'll only keep me." Anne said. "Well," said Marilla. "I suppose I might as well tell you. Matthew and I have decided to keep you-that is if you will try to be a good little girl and show yourself grateful. Why, child, whatever is the matter?" " I'm crying," said Anne. "I can't think why. I'm glad as can be. I'm so happy. But can you tell me why I'm crying?" Anne Shirley is not an ordinary child. She is a little orphan girl who always talks and tries to make everything exciting. She is imaginative and has lots of ambitions even as a little girl. Anne has an atrocious and frightening life until she mistakenly comes to the Cuthberts' house. The Cuthberts are looking for a boy for help in their daily chores, due to becoming old, but when they meet the interesting Anne, the Cuthberts can't resist adopting her. Anne gets so excited and thanks the Cuthberts for their kindness to her. Ms. Cuthbert wants Anne to be a smart and humble old-fashioned girl while the quiet Mr. Cuthbert only wants to make Anne happy. This story tells about Anne's adventurous life as she adapts to her new environment, including making friends and going to school. Anne also struggles to fit in with all of the older, prettier girls in her surroundings. Beside a few weak and boring parts, this story is fun, exciting, and suspenseful, and it is thrilling to watch Anne as she grows up and tries to make the best of herself. I would recommend this lovable young adult novel to all those people who have ever wondered how it feels to be an orphan.
Bookworm1279 More than 1 year ago
Anne Shirley comes to Green Gables in hopes of finding a home to call home at last. That she does find in Matthew and Marilla who take her in. Of course at first Marilla does not want her because she is not a boy who she wanted but Matthew has fallen in love with Anne wants her to stay. Stay she does and changes their lives forever. She had her ways of living and seening life and gets into plenty of trouble all on her own. Even Gilbert had noticed Anne he does something that Anne really does not like and ends up not likeing him for what he even though he is sorry.
TechnoBookWorm More than 1 year ago
My 7 year old loved it. She read it in one day, all by herself. She went back and read it again. I would recommend the Classic Start Series for all young children.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I love this book it makes you Feel good inside and you will laugh out loud in this sweet daring and funny adventure of anne of green gables
Lindell Huskey More than 1 year ago
few typos. easy to read. good book.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anne Of Green Gables is a wonderful and amusing book. Anne is a little red-headed girl who comes to live with Marilla and Matthew Cuthbert from the orphanage. It turns out thoughh that they wanted a boy to help Matthew, who is gettinng on in years on the farm. So Marilla prepares to take Anne back to the orphanage, but Matthew has grown to love Anne and begs Marilla to keep Anne
Bookworm1FG More than 1 year ago
I purchased this book as a gift for my daughter who had read it as a young person. She was thrilled. Bookworm1FG
mgoodrich718 More than 1 year ago
Anne Of Green Gables By L.M. Montgomery<br /> <br /> 3 Stars<br /> <br /> Anne comes to Avonlea to be adopted by Marilla and Matthew Cuthbert. She is not however what they were expecting. They wanted a boy and she is an outspoken red-headed girl. She wins the Cuthberts over though and they agree to keep her if she minds her manners and can be molded into what they consider a respectable little girl. Anne learns a lot during her time in Avonlea. She goes through many trials during her fight to be accepted by the community. She finally makes a friend in Diana who is her very first true friend. That even goes awry for awhile because Anne's outspoken ways are often misunderstood. This novel tells the struggle of Anne through her becoming a woman.<br /> This is a truly delightful story. Good small town drama. I found myself completely relating to Anne through many of her trials. One being her inability to be seen and not heard even when it was something that was completely against what she believed in. It was also amusing reading how people viewed her red hair or anyone that had it. Not that it's much different now but it was much worse back then. I loved living in Anne's world for a little while.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I'm thirteen and I totally agree. I have even read Les Miserables (unabridged) so to me Twilight is just plain stupid.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I love this book. I also love the movie! For the movie it is almost exactly like the book exept a couple parts taken out and put into into. They are both really good. My favorite character is Gilbert then its Anne. This is an injoyable book to read and to watch.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Awesome book , theres alot of typos and realy easy too read .i totaly recamend it for any age !
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This is a good book
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Find out in Anne of Green Gables! This book is a wonderful classic that has enthralled readers for many generations with its compelling plot, well developed characters, vivid writing, and emotions. After reading this book, you will want to sprint to your local library for the next book in the series.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Love the book.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Yall need to learn to enjoy the clasics and not rely on those stupidbooks on vampires and zombies and all this twilight crap im 11 and like the clasics
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Whoever typed this did a horrid job. About 35 pages in the text is so misconstrued that is not understandable. No wonder its free