An Anthropologist on Mars: Seven Paradoxical Tales

An Anthropologist on Mars: Seven Paradoxical Tales

by Oliver Sacks
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An Anthropologist on Mars 4.3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 12 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Oliver Sacks 'An Anthropologist on Mars' was one of the most interesting books I have ever read. Although Sacks took a slightly scientific perspective in the stories, the subjects and his observations were extremely gripping. I read this book for a class and ended up doing a research paper on one of the conditions (cerebral achromatopsia) for another class because I was so intrigued. I suggest, though, that the reader should not read the stories in the order they are in the book. I read until the second, skipped to the sixth and seventh, and then read the third, fourth, and fifth. I recommend this book to anyone who would like to learn more about different traits and the coping mechanisms people with these traits develop. FIVE STAR BOOK!
Kenlee More than 1 year ago
I did like the book. The language is a little complex for an easy/comfy read due to the medical terms. Yet, I still liked it. Opens up your mind on some level and lets you think differently and more openly. Definatelly different from what I was reading before; therefore hard to accept at first but I'd recommend it for sure.
cloggiedownunder More than 1 year ago
An Anthropologist on Mars is the sixth book by neurologist Oliver Wolf Sacks and deals with seven intriguing case studies. The first is an artist who becomes completely colour-blind (cerebral achromatopsia) and details both the unimaginable impact this has on normal life, and the adaptation that can make life liveable. The second involves amnesia and looks at different ways of forming memory. The third deals with Tourette’s syndrome in a surgeon with a pilot’s licence, shows both the funny and the dark sides of this condition, and the effect of medications. The fourth examines the effect of regaining sight on a person who has been blind since childhood. The fifth involves seizures of reminiscence and examines what memory actually is. The sixth deals with an autistic savant artist, and the final case study is about the well-known Aspergian, Temple Grandin. It is this remarkable woman who, in explaining what it feels like to try to understand normal human behaviour, lends her phrase to the title, An Anthropologist on Mars. Grandin gives a fascinating insight into the autistic spectrum, explaining that autistic people Think in Pictures (the title of her own book). Occasionally Sacks is rather too generous with technical detail jargon, so the reader may be tempted to skim or skip. The footnotes enlarge on or update the text, the book is fully indexed and there is a bibliography for those interested in further reading. This book is interesting, occasionally scary and will make the reader appreciate the brain they have.
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