Anti-Intellectualism in American Life

Anti-Intellectualism in American Life

by Richard Hofstadter

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Overview

Winner of the 1964 Pulitzer Prize in Non-Fiction.

In this award-winning classic work of consensus history, Richard Hofstadter, author of The Age of Reform, examines the role of social movements in the perception of intellect in American life. 

"As Mr. Hofstadter unfolds the fascinating story, it is no crude battle of eggheads and fatheads. It is a rich, complex, shifting picture of the life of the mind in a society dominated by the ideal of practical success." --Robert Peel in the Christian Science Monitor 

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780394703176
Publisher: Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group
Publication date: 02/28/1966
Pages: 464
Sales rank: 110,506
Product dimensions: 5.18(w) x 7.98(h) x 1.04(d)

About the Author

Richard Hofstadter (1916-1970) was DeWitt Clinton Professor of American History at Columbia University and the author of several books, including The Paranoid Style in American Politics, The Age of Reform, and The American Political Tradition. He was twice awarded the Pulitzer Prize.

Adam Verner has narrated over one hundred books, including the AudioFile Earphones Award winner Pavilion of Women by Pearl S. Buck. Adam works as a full-time voice actor and on stage in Chicago.

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Anti-Intellectualism in American Life 3.1 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 22 reviews.
dnlarsen More than 1 year ago
I really wanted to read this book, but the scanning of it was so poor that after just a few pages I was really getting tired of trying to interpret all the scan errors. Doesn't anybody review the OCR scan results before putting a book out to thr public. Try again.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This is not the title shown.
JBE More than 1 year ago
This is NOT the Richard Hofstadter book "Anti-intellectualism in American Life." I'm not sure what the heck it is, since it appears to be mostly in Latin. But it's mislabeled either way.
turkeyMS More than 1 year ago
The book downloaded was published about 80 earlier than the Hofstadter book. Why?
jddunn on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
I couldn't finish this the first time I tried. Just wasn¿t in the mood at the time. I thought it would be kind of interesting reading on whacked out stuff like the Know-Nothings, the KKK, nativism, the Birchers, and so on, but it turns out it¿s mostly about the influence of Evangelicals on our politics and culture throughout American history. And I thought I wanted to know more about that too, but it turned out to be pretty boring in practice, so I dropped it, for now. I¿ll finish eventually, because it feels like stuff I ought to know, in the light of current events.I ended up finishing this up a couple of years later. It was mostly good, but what he groups under anti-intellectualism gets a little too broad for my liking. I mean, that's the thesis and what the book is setting out to do, and most of it probably does count as anti-intellectual under a strict definition of the term, but it sort of rankled to see any form of populism or attempts at democratic participation in institutions getting lumped in with Bircher loons. I'm pretty sure he doesn't entirely mean to make those equivalencies, but it's sort of a problem with the project. When you start to make progressive and non-canon education look like it's somewhere on a continuum with Bircher wingnuttiness, something has gone wrong, category-wise. All that might fall under the rubrik of "anti-intellectual," but that's putting forward an awfully narrow and conservative idea of what "intellectual" is. Plenty of credible intellectuals were for the educational ideas and some of the other demo-populist social trends he covers, whereas you can't find many if any who were for the loonier stuff. I dunno, maybe I just had the wrong idea about what this book was setting out to do to begin with, as, like I said above, I thought it was going to focus much more on the really nasty nativist, racist, patriarchal, etc strands of American anti-intellectualism than it did.
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