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Antigone
     

Antigone

3.2 6
by Sophocles
 

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Based on the conviction that only translators who write poetry themselves can properly recreate the celebrated and timeless tragedies of Aeschylus, Sophocles, and Euripides, the Greek Tragedy in New Translations series offers new translations that go beyond the literal meaning of the Greek in order to evoke the poetry of the originals. The series seeks to recover the

Overview

Based on the conviction that only translators who write poetry themselves can properly recreate the celebrated and timeless tragedies of Aeschylus, Sophocles, and Euripides, the Greek Tragedy in New Translations series offers new translations that go beyond the literal meaning of the Greek in order to evoke the poetry of the originals. The series seeks to recover the entire extant corpus of Greek tragedy, quite as though the ancient tragedians wrote in the English of our own time. Under the editorship of Peter Burian and Alan Shapiro, each of these volumes includes a critical introduction, commentary on the text, full stage directions, and a glossary of the mythical and geographical references in the plays. This finely-tuned translation of Sophocles' Antigone by Richard Emil Braun, both a distinguished poet and a professional scholar-critic, offers, in lean, sinewy verse and lyrics of unusual intensity, an interpretation informed by exemplary scholarship and critical insight. Braun presents an Antigone not marred by excessive sentimentality or pietistic attitudes. His translation underscores the extraordinary structural symmetry and beauty of Sophocles' design by focusing on the balanced and harmonious view of tragically opposed wills that makes the play so moving. Unlike the traditionally gentle and pious protagonist opposed to a brutal and villainous Creon, Braun's Antigone emerges as a true Sophoclean heroine--with all the harshness and even hubris, as well as pathos and beauty, that Sophoclean heroism requires. Braun also reveals a Creon as stubbornly "principled" as Antigone, instead of simply the arrogant tyrant of conventional interpretations.

Editorial Reviews

Joseph Russo
A lucid, well-paced translation, natural enough sounding in the dialogue to make a good acting version.
Library Journal
These two new additions to Oxford's "Greek Tragedy in New Translations" series only add to the luster of the previous releases. Each is firmly packed with insightful introductions, comprehensive and numbered notes, glossaries, and up-to-date bibliographies (the plays' texts take up about half of each volume). The collaboration of poet and scholar in each volume produces a language that is easy to read and easy to speak (compare, for instance, the Watchman's first lines in Shapiro and Burian's Agamemnon with those in Lattimore's 1947 translation). Each volume's introduction presents the play's action and themes with some detail. The translators' notes describe the linguistic twists and turns involved in rendering the text into a modern poetic language. Both volumes are enthusiastically recommended for academic libraries, theater groups, and theater departments.-Larry Schwartz, Minnesota State Univ., Moorhead Copyright 2003 Reed Business Information.
From the Publisher
“This version is far superior to any translation of the Antigone known to me. For the modern reader, the Antigone is now a rich and rewarding play in English.”—Robert J. Rabel, author of Plot and Point of View in the “Iliad”

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780199838974
Publisher:
Oxford University Press
Publication date:
02/01/1990
Series:
Greek Tragedy in New Translations
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
Sales rank:
1,229,333
File size:
2 MB

Related Subjects

Meet the Author

About the Translator: Richard Emil Braun is Professor of Classics at the University of Alberta in Edmonton. He has published several volumes of poetry and translations, including Children Passing, The Foreclosure, and Persius' Satires.

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Antigone (Prestwick House Literary Touchstone Press Series) 3.2 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 6 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Maybe my nooks messed up, but half of the play is cut off and randomly it will skip words and sentences
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