Appalachian Genesis: The Clinch River Valley from Prehistoric Times to the End of the Frontier Era

Appalachian Genesis: The Clinch River Valley from Prehistoric Times to the End of the Frontier Era

by Richard Lee Fulgham

Hardcover

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Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781570720888
Publisher: Overmountain Press
Publication date: 12/28/2000
Pages: 156
Product dimensions: 6.20(w) x 9.10(h) x 0.70(d)

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Appalachian Genesis: The Clinch River Valley from Prehistoric Times to the End of the Frontier Era 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 5 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
The story begins with a catastrophe -- as the continent of Africa rams into North America, thrusting up the Appalachian Mountains, off which runs the Clinch River . . . which carves a valley so rich and bountiful that it is fought over by (get this!) paleo-Indians, 'Xulan Empire' Indians, Cherokee, Shawnee, Mingo, Spanish Conquistadors, English explorers, Long-hunters, pioneers, French trappers, British Colonists, Tories, Patriots. . . . Wars are fought for possession of the Clinch Valley by Xulans vs. Conquistadors; Cherokee vs. Shawnee; Shawnee & Cherokee warriors vs. Virginia militiamen; French & Indian fighters vs. the British; Native Americans vs. settlers; Redcoats vs. Overmountainmen . . . . The book ends with the (so-called) civilization of the valley, marked by President Andrew Jackson's decree to round up every Cherokee at bayonet point and march them to Oklahoma territory . . . killing 4000 of them along the way. It's a book every young American of every ethnic background should read -- not to mention everyone else. If you can see what happened in the Clinch River Valley, you can see what happened in all America. It's also beautifully written. Here's just a sample, where the author is talking about ice-age hunters in the Clinch Valley. 'Certainly the paleo-Indians were here in the Clinch Valley when all was frozen and the icy air made their lungs rattle. Certainly at night they held their Clovis spears tight, huddled close around their campfires and together watched the blood-red shining eyes -- perhaps of sabre-toothed cats -- watching them so ominously from just beyond the firelight. Certainly they gazed at the unchanging stars and wondered silently if there was not more to life than ambushing those massive ice-age beasts less clever than they.'
Guest More than 1 year ago
I'm the author of five tradtionally published books myself, so I know the amount of talent and sheer hard work it took to produce APPALACHIAN GENESIS. Also, Richard and I were starving writers together back in the 1980's and early 1900's, so I know it took him three years to research this book, another two to write it, and then two and a half years waiting for it to be published. But it was worth every moment of his time, to we who profit from his incredible patience, eloquent style and demand for historical accuracy. I came to hate history in high school, which I identified with dull teachers droning on and on about the industrial revolution or some such equally numbing subject. But Fulgham has written an account that is fascinating throughout and imbuded with a poet's voice. Mountains burst upward toward the 'astonished' sky and there are frequent eloquent lines like 'The future of the Children of the Sun darkened as their reverence dimmed'. (Speaking of the Cherokee.) He has made the Clinch River Valley and its large cast of characters come alive. The prose is wonderfully lucid. The imaginative leaps he makes in order to draw the reader into scenes feel right to me. The poet pulls it off, creating moments like the harrowing burning of Mrs. Moore and the bald terror of that line, 'How strange, she must have thought, to be so cold in the midst of flames.' APPALACHIAN GENESIS is packed with drama and strange ironies. Richard Fulgham has produced a great book, and knowing that, just holding it in his hands should sustain him. Richard and I are literary brothers . . . and across space and time, I shake his hand.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I'm the author of five traditionally published books myself, so I know the amount of talent and sheer hard work it took to produce APPALACHIAN GENESIS. Richard and I were starving writers together in the 1980's and early 1900's, so I know it took him three years to research this book, one year to writer & edit it, and another two and a half years waiting for it to be published. But it was worth every moment of his time, to we who profit from his incredible patience, eloquent style and insistance on historical accuracy. I came to hate history in high school, which I identified with dull teachers droning on about the industrial revolution or some such equally numbing subject. But Richard Fulgham has written an account that is fascinating throughout and imbuded with a poet's voice. Mountains burst upward toward the 'astonished' sky and there are frequent eloquent lines like, 'The future of the Children of the Sun darkened as their reverence dimmed'. He has made the Clinch River Valley and its large cast of characters come alive. The prose is wonderfully lucid. The imaginative leaps he makes in order to draw the reader into scenes feel right to me. The poet pulls it off, creating moments like the harrowing burning of Mrs. Moore and the bald terror of that line, 'How strange, she must have thought, to be so cold in the midst of flames'. APPALACHIAN GENESIS is packed with drama and strange ironies. Richard has produced a great book, and knowing that, just holding it in his hands should sustain him. Richard and I are literary brothers -- and across time and space, I shake his hand.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I'm astonished Fulgham has crammed so much history in less than 200 pages. He places the reader right in the action, too! It's an exciting book to read, especially about early Native American relationships with invading English settlers. What imagry! I read a lot of action novels, and I've never read more exciting accounts of battles and the combatants involved in them. He brings characters like the renegade Cherokee warrior 'Dragging Canoe' to life for us! And inbetween the violent encounters there are some really remarkably beautiful passages of pure Nature worship, reminding me of Loren Eisley and Joseph Wood Krutch. Fulgham's a hell of a writer!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I only received an eight page brochure for the book and not the book itself. Therefore am unable to read the book. George