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A Apple Pie
     

A Apple Pie

5.0 1
by Gennady Spirin
 

In this spectacular recreation of one of the most beloved alphabet rhymes of all time, New York Times Best Illustrator Gennady Spirin brings to life the delicious and whimsical fortunes of an apple pie—through the alphabet! Look for the tiny butterfly in the picture where B bit it. Find the fox on the page where F fought for it.

Discover hundreds of

Overview

In this spectacular recreation of one of the most beloved alphabet rhymes of all time, New York Times Best Illustrator Gennady Spirin brings to life the delicious and whimsical fortunes of an apple pie—through the alphabet! Look for the tiny butterfly in the picture where B bit it. Find the fox on the page where F fought for it.

Discover hundreds of delightful details in these enchanting pictures each time the book is shared. A timeless celebration of the alphabet, and an incredible work of art by the great artist Gennady Spirin.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
A 17th-century English alphabet rhyme inspires Spirin's illustrations, which take on a distinctly Victorian tone. Set inside or outside English country houses, the full-bleed paintings and silhouette images teem with rosy-cheeked girls in long flowing dresses, bonnets and sashes, and boys clad in knickers. The top of the page contains each letter printed in capital and lowercase, followed by the same letters and a two- or three-word phrase written in elegant, old-fashioned script: "A, a. Apple Pie/ B, b. Bit it./ C, c. Cut it." Underneath the text, an ivory- colored capital letter serves as each illustration's centerpiece. For example, an A forms an arch, under which a crew of beefeaters plus bakers sporting white hats and aprons carry in an enormous golden pie, while women and children (some riding dappled rocking horses) applaud the parade. For "Q, q. Quartered it," the Q's oval acts as a peephole into a room where children cluster around an old woman (who could be Mother Goose) cutting a pie. An apple nestles in the bottom corner of each page, with a rotating cast of creatures whose names begin with that page's letter (e.g., G has a grasshopper, H, a horse). Throughout, the recurring characters' postures and facial expressions convey a longing and reverence for apple pie. Spirin's style is especially well suited to this time-proven rhyme. All ages. (Aug.) Copyright 2005 Reed Business Information.
School Library Journal
PreS-K-Whimsically detailed watercolors revitalize an alphabet verse dating from the 1600s. Each painting tells its own story as the rhyme follows the apple pie from A to Z. A large capital letter on each page frames the painting, provides a stage for the action, or acts as a prop for the characters. Calligraphic letters, printed and scripted, are positioned at the top of each page with the rhyme. A simple apple appears in the lower corner of each entry with an animal, appropriate to the letter, sitting or hiding near it. Delicately rendered vines and flowers are reminiscent of Victorian botanical prints. Busy details offer new discoveries with each reading. The letters, text, and paintings are unified in style and become a single work of art. This new interpretation is beautifully done and offers strong competition to the familiar 1886 Kate Greenaway version (Penguin).-Carolyn Janssen, Public Library of Cincinnati and Hamilton County, OH Copyright 2005 Reed Business Information.
Kirkus Reviews
Far from being just another abecedarium, Spirin's signature finely lined, captivating watercolors stretch the parameters with his engaging interpretation of the English nursery rhyme. As exuberant children follow the merry fortunes of this gargantuan apple pie, the artwork is filled with delicious Victorian detail, creating a story in which the letters play characters. Each letter is scripted at the top in four or five type styles as: "B bit it; C cut it; D dealt it; E eats it." An apple in the corner of each scene adds a sub-motif of intertwined animals and birds: grasshopper sitting on top for "G"; nightingale atop for "N." Filled with diminutive detailing of fabric patterns, clothing folds, wisps of hair, rose vines, even clover in the grass, readers will pore over the pages brimming with germane activities. With Anno-like precision, Sis-like intricacy and the charm of Greenaway apparel, Spirin has fashioned an amazing work of art with outstanding creativity. From A to Z, absolutely delectable. (Picture book. All ages)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780399239816
Publisher:
Penguin Young Readers Group
Publication date:
08/18/2005
Pages:
32
Product dimensions:
10.82(w) x 10.79(h) x 0.42(d)
Age Range:
2 - 6 Years

What People are Saying About This

From the Publisher
"Whimsically detailed watercolors revitalize an alphabet verse dating from the 1600s. Each painting tells its own story as the rhyme follows the apple pie from A to Z. A large capital letter on each page frames the painting, provides a stage for the action, or acts as a prop for the characters. Calligraphic letters, printed and scripted, are positioned at the top of each page with the rhyme. A simple apple appears in the lower corner of each entry with an animal, appropriate to the letter, sitting or hiding near it. Delicately rendered vines and flowers are reminiscent of Victorian botanical prints. Busy details offer new discoveries with each reading. The letters, text, and paintings are unified in style and become a single work of art. This new interpretation is beautifully done and offers strong competition to the familiar 1886 Kate Greenaway version (Penguin)."
–School Library Journal, starred review

Meet the Author

Gennady Spirin was born in 1948 in a small city near Moscow. A graduate of the Strogonov Academy of Fine Arts, he is noted for his beautiful illustrations, meticulously researched and exquisitely executed in pencil and watercolor. His work has brought him international renown as many awards, including the Gold Medal of the Society of Illustrators, the Golden Apple of the Bratislava International Biennale of children's book illustration, First Prize for Illustration at the Barcelona International Children's Book Fair, and the Premio Grafico at the Bologna Children's Book Fair. His book Gulliver's Adventures in Lilliput (retold by Ann Keay Beneduce) was chosen one of the Ten Best Illustrated Books of the Year by the New York Times Book Review.

Gennady Spirin came to the United States in 1991 and now lives with his wife and their three sons in Princeton, New Jersey. copyright © 2000 by Penguin Putnam Books for Young Readers. All rights reserved.
Gennady Spirin was born in 1948 in a small city near Moscow. A graduate of the Strogonov Academy of Fine Arts, he is noted for his beautiful illustrations, meticulously researched and exquisitely executed in pencil and watercolor. His work has brought him international renown as many awards, including the Gold Medal of the Society of Illustrators, the Golden Apple of the Bratislava International Biennale of children's book illustration, First Prize for Illustration at the Barcelona International Children's Book Fair, and the Premio Grafico at the Bologna Children's Book Fair. His book Gulliver's Adventures in Lilliput (retold by Ann Keay Beneduce) was chosen one of the Ten Best Illustrated Books of the Year by the New York Times Book Review.

Gennady Spirin came to the United States in 1991 and now lives with his wife and their three sons in Princeton, New Jersey. copyright © 2000 by Penguin Putnam Books for Young Readers. All rights reserved.

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A Apple Pie 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
If you are fortunate enough to have seen or better yet own a copy of 'Yakov and the Seven Thieves,' 'The Tale of the Firebird' or any other of the keepsake books illustrated by Gennady Spirin you know what a gifted artist he is. He blends his Russian heritage with techniques of the Renaissance masters to create some of the most detailed, the most beautiful paintings to be found between the covers of children's books. He brings us another treasure with illustrations for 'A Apple Pie,' a fanciful ABC dating to the 1600s in England. It is enchanting worthy of turning to again and again. I find something new with each study of a page - the tiny butterfly on the toddler's trousers in 'B Bit it' - the cunning gray kitten sniffing the delicious aroma in 'C Cut it.' and on it goes. Each illustration is a marvel, a testament to Spirin's genius. Born outside of Moscow in 1948, he came to our country at the invitation of Philomel and Dial Press. His professional awards are far too numerous to mention - simply enjoy 'A Apple Pie,' and be grateful for the creative gifts of Gennady Spirin. - Gail Cooke