ISBN-10:
0130889830
ISBN-13:
2900130889835
Pub. Date:
05/08/2001
Publisher:
Pearson
Applied Structural Steel Design / Edition 4

Applied Structural Steel Design / Edition 4

by Leonard Spiegel
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  • Product Details

    ISBN-13: 2900130889835
    Publisher: Pearson
    Publication date: 05/08/2001
    Edition description: 4RD ED.
    Pages: 501
    Product dimensions: 6.00(w) x 1.25(h) x 9.00(d)

    Read an Excerpt

    The primary objective of the fourth edition of Applied Structural Steel Design remains unchanged since its first edition: to furnish the reader with a basic understanding of the strength and behavior of structural steel members and their interrelationships in simple structural systems.

    The emphasis of this edition remains on the analysis and design of structural steel elements in accordance with the American Institute of Steel Construction (AISC) Specification for Structural Steel Buildings—Allowable Stress Design (ASD) and the AISC Manual of Steel Construction—ASD, 9th Edition.

    Allowable stress design has been the traditional design method for structural steel. A modern design method called Load and Resistance Factor Design (LRFD) was officially introduced in 1986 when AISC published the first edition of the Manual of Steel Construction—Load and Resistance Factor Design and the LRFD Specification for Structural Steel Buildings.

    Both design methods are currently being used, and although most engineering professionals agree that LRFD will become the dominant method in the future, the traditional ASD method remains popular and practical and is still widely used. This edition is seen as a transitional text that bridges the two methods. ASD is utilized throughout the first 12 chapters. In these chapters, continual reference is made to the AISC Manual of Steel Construction—ASD, 9th edition, and its use as a ready reference and companion publication to the text is strongly recommended. The last two chapters furnish a simplified (but comprehensive) introduction to the LRFD method. Chapter 13 deals with structural members, and Chapter 14 covers basic connections.

    In this fourth edition, discussions have been updated to reflect current information. Additionally, examples and homework problems reflect the greater usage of higher-strength steels, homework problems have been added, and some have been edited.

    With a great amount of relevant structural steel research and literature available in various forms, it remains the intent of this book to translate this vast amount of information and data into an integrated source. It is not intended to be a comprehensive theoretical treatise of the subject, because we believe that such a document could easily obscure the fundamentals that we strive to emphasize in engineering technology programs. In addition, we are of the opinion that adequate comprehensive books on structural steel design do exist for those who seek the theoretical background, the research studies, and more rigorous applications.

    The text content has remained primarily an elementary, noncalculus, practical approach to the design and analysis of structural steel members, using numerous example problems and a step-by-step solution format. In addition, chapters on structural steel detailing of beams and columns are included in an effort to convey to the reader a feeling for the design-detailing sequence.

    The book has been thoroughly tested over the years in our engineering technology programs and should serve as a valuable design guide and source for technologists, technicians, and engineering and architectural students. Additionally, it will aid engineers and architects preparing for state licensing examinations for professional registration.

    As in the past, gratitude is extended to students, colleagues, and users of the book who, with their questions, helpful criticisms, suggestions, and enthusiastic encouragement, have provided input for this edition.

    Thanks also to the reviewers of this edition for their suggestions and comments: Thomas Burns, University of Cincinnati; John W. Buttlewerth, Cincinnati State Technical and Community College; Sanjiv Gokhale, Purdue University; and Madan Mehta, University of Texas at Arlington.

    George F. Limbrunner

    Table of Contents

    Chapter 1Introduction to Steel Structures1
    1-1Steel Structures2
    1-2Handbooks and Specifications3
    1-3Steel Properties4
    1-4Products Available8
    1-5The Building Project13
    1-6Design Considerations14
    1-7Notation and Calculations16
    References17
    Problems18
    Chapter 2Tension Members20
    2-1Introduction21
    2-2Tension Member Analysis22
    2-3Effective Net Area31
    2-4Length Effects37
    2-5Design of Tension Members38
    2-6Threaded Rods in Tension43
    Problems45
    Chapter 3Axially Loaded Compression Members55
    3-1Introduction56
    3-2Ideal Columns58
    3-3Effective Lengths61
    3-4ASDS Allowable Stresses for Compression Members64
    3-5Analysis of Columns (ASDS)67
    3-6Design of Axially Loaded Columns73
    3-7Double-Angle Members75
    3-8Column Base Plates (Axial Load)78
    References87
    Problems87
    Chapter 4Beams93
    4-1Introduction94
    4-2The Mechanics of Bending95
    4-3Allowable Bending Stress98
    4-4Analysis of Beams for Moment104
    4-5Summary of Procedure: Beam Analysis for Moment Only107
    4-6Inadequate Lateral Support108
    4-7Design of Beams for Moment114
    4-8Summary of Procedure: Beam Design for Moment122
    4-9Shear in Beams123
    4-10Deflection127
    4-11Holes in Beams130
    4-12Web Yielding and Web Crippling133
    4-13Beam Bearing Plates137
    Reference142
    Problems142
    Chapter 5Special Beams153
    5-1Lintels154
    5-2Flitch Beams162
    5-3Cover-Plated Beams168
    5-4Unsymmetrical Bending175
    5-5Composite Bending Members182
    5-6Welded Plate Girders188
    References199
    Problems200
    Chapter 6Beam-Columns206
    6-1Introduction207
    6-2Analysis of Beam-Columns (ASDS)209
    6-3Design of Beam-Columns (ASDS)216
    6-4Effective Length Factor K221
    Problems226
    Chapter 7Bolted Connections230
    7-1Introduction231
    7-2Types of Bolted Connections231
    7-3High-Strength Bolts235
    7-4Installation of High-Strength Bolts235
    7-5Hole Types239
    7-6Strength and Behavior of High-Strength Bolted Connections240
    7-7Framed Beam Connections260
    7-8Unstiffened Seated Beam Connections263
    7-9End-Plate Shear Connections268
    7-10Semirigid Connections269
    7-11Eccentrically Loaded Bolted Connections275
    References284
    Problems284
    Chapter 8Welded Connections294
    8-1Introduction295
    8-2Types of Welds and Joints297
    8-3Strength and Behavior of Fillet Welded Connections301
    8-4Strength and Behavior of Plug and Slot Welded Connections311
    8-5End-Plate Shear Connections314
    8-6Eccentrically Loaded Welded Connections316
    8-7Unstiffened Welded Seated Beam Connections322
    8-8Welded Framed Beam Connections324
    8-9Welding Symbols329
    8-10Welding Inspection329
    References332
    Problems332
    Chapter 9Open Web Steel Joists and Metal Deck338
    9-1Introduction to Steel Joists339
    9-2Open Web Steel Joists, K-Series342
    9-3Floor Vibrations348
    9-4Corrugated Steel Deck348
    References351
    Problems351
    Chapter 10Continuous Construction and Plastic Design353
    10-1Introduction354
    10-2Elastic Design of Continuous Beams356
    10-3Introduction to Plastic Design359
    10-4Plastic Design Application: Simply Supported Beams362
    10-5Plastic Design Application: Fixed-Ended Beams364
    10-6Plastic Design Application: Continuous Beams366
    References368
    Problems368
    Chapter 11Structural Steel Detailing: Beams370
    11-1Introduction371
    11-2Obtaining the Steel371
    11-3Drawing Preparation371
    11-4Beam Details373
    References391
    Problems392
    Chapter 12Structural Steel Detailing: Columns394
    12-1Introduction395
    12-2Column Base Details395
    12-3Column Details399
    12-4Shop Drawings of Columns399
    Problems404
    Chapter 13LRFD: Structural Members405
    13-1Introduction406
    13-2Basis for LRFD407
    13-3Tension Members409
    13-4Axially Loaded Columns and Other Compression Members417
    13-5Bending Members422
    References437
    Problems437
    Chapter 14LRFD: Connections442
    14-1Introduction443
    14-2High-Strength Bolted Connections443
    14-3Fillet Welded Connections455
    Problems461
    Appendices
    AOpen Web Steel Joists469
    BMetrication474
    B-1The International System of Units474
    B-2Sl Style and Usage476
    B-3Conversion Factors478
    References483
    CFlowcharts484
    Answers to Selected Problems491
    Index495

    Preface

    The primary objective of the fourth edition of Applied Structural Steel Design remains unchanged since its first edition: to furnish the reader with a basic understanding of the strength and behavior of structural steel members and their interrelationships in simple structural systems.

    The emphasis of this edition remains on the analysis and design of structural steel elements in accordance with the American Institute of Steel Construction (AISC) Specification for Structural Steel Buildings—Allowable Stress Design (ASD) and the AISC Manual of Steel Construction—ASD, 9th Edition.

    Allowable stress design has been the traditional design method for structural steel. A modern design method called Load and Resistance Factor Design (LRFD) was officially introduced in 1986 when AISC published the first edition of the Manual of Steel Construction—Load and Resistance Factor Design and the LRFD Specification for Structural Steel Buildings.

    Both design methods are currently being used, and although most engineering professionals agree that LRFD will become the dominant method in the future, the traditional ASD method remains popular and practical and is still widely used. This edition is seen as a transitional text that bridges the two methods. ASD is utilized throughout the first 12 chapters. In these chapters, continual reference is made to the AISC Manual of Steel Construction—ASD, 9th edition, and its use as a ready reference and companion publication to the text is strongly recommended. The last two chapters furnish a simplified (but comprehensive) introduction to the LRFD method. Chapter 13 deals with structuralmembers, and Chapter 14 covers basic connections.

    In this fourth edition, discussions have been updated to reflect current information. Additionally, examples and homework problems reflect the greater usage of higher-strength steels, homework problems have been added, and some have been edited.

    With a great amount of relevant structural steel research and literature available in various forms, it remains the intent of this book to translate this vast amount of information and data into an integrated source. It is not intended to be a comprehensive theoretical treatise of the subject, because we believe that such a document could easily obscure the fundamentals that we strive to emphasize in engineering technology programs. In addition, we are of the opinion that adequate comprehensive books on structural steel design do exist for those who seek the theoretical background, the research studies, and more rigorous applications.

    The text content has remained primarily an elementary, noncalculus, practical approach to the design and analysis of structural steel members, using numerous example problems and a step-by-step solution format. In addition, chapters on structural steel detailing of beams and columns are included in an effort to convey to the reader a feeling for the design-detailing sequence.

    The book has been thoroughly tested over the years in our engineering technology programs and should serve as a valuable design guide and source for technologists, technicians, and engineering and architectural students. Additionally, it will aid engineers and architects preparing for state licensing examinations for professional registration.

    As in the past, gratitude is extended to students, colleagues, and users of the book who, with their questions, helpful criticisms, suggestions, and enthusiastic encouragement, have provided input for this edition.

    Thanks also to the reviewers of this edition for their suggestions and comments: Thomas Burns, University of Cincinnati; John W. Buttlewerth, Cincinnati State Technical and Community College; Sanjiv Gokhale, Purdue University; and Madan Mehta, University of Texas at Arlington.

    George F. Limbrunner

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