ISBN-10:
0201708531
ISBN-13:
9780201708530
Pub. Date:
03/27/2001
Publisher:
Addison-Wesley
Applying Use Cases: A Practical Guide / Edition 2

Applying Use Cases: A Practical Guide / Edition 2

by Geri Schneider, Jason P. Winters
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Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780201708530
Publisher: Addison-Wesley
Publication date: 03/27/2001
Series: Addison-Wesley Object Technology Series
Edition description: REV
Pages: 272
Product dimensions: 7.20(w) x 9.10(h) x 0.70(d)

About the Author

Geri Schneider is a senior consultant and trainer at Andrews Technology, Inc., in the areas of iterative development, software project management, object-oriented analysis and design, software architecture, design patterns, and use cases. In addition, she teaches in the software engineering management certificate program for the University of California Santa Cruz Extension. She previously worked for Rational Software Corporation mentoring customers in the areas of iterative development, object technologies, and use case analysis. Jason P. Winters is a staff design engineer for Cadence Design Systems, Inc. He was previously with Lucent Technologies as a staff engineer. At Lucent, he designed and built specialized tools, promoted the use of modern software development practices and tools throughout the company, and mentored projects on object-oriented analysis and design, UML, and use cases.

0201708531AB04062001

Read an Excerpt

There have been many changes for us and for the UML since the first edition was released in September 1998. The book has changed to stay current. The material in the first edition is also in the second edition, but you may find it in a new location. We moved the engineering-oriented material to the end of the book, and the business-oriented material to the beginning. This should make it easier for different audiences to find the material that interests them.

We updated the book to UML 1.3. A lot of the changes are in Chapters 3 and 4 because that is where we described most of the notation. The uses relationship became two relationships in UML 1.3, include and generalization. The extends relationship became extend. In both cases the notation changed as well. The definition of scenarios changed a bit too. What we used to call scenarios are now called paths.

We have added some new material that we found useful and important. Chapter 6 is a new chapter on setting the level of detail in use cases. This includes information on business process-level use cases and maintaining traceability between use cases at different levels of detail. Chapter 7, Documenting Use Cases, includes some ideas on handling login and CRUD (create, read, update, delete) in use cases. Chapter 8, Reviews, has a new section on common mistakes we have seen and how to fix them. We have included more information on sequence diagrams in Chapters 5 and 9.

There have been changes for me and Jason as well. Jason left Octel and is now a staff engineer at Cadence Design Systems. I liked having my own business, but didn't like the bookkeeping, so I took a job running the OO division of Andrews Technology, Inc. We still have Wyyzzk and Jason does some weekend consulting for that business. Things even changed on the publishing side. Addison-Wesley is now part of Pearson Education, and we have a whole new team managing the Object Technology series. They have been wonderful to work with and made the transition as smooth as possible.

One question we get asked a lot is: What do the footprints and people talking icons mean? The footprints mark major steps in the process. The people talking appear next to the storyline.

Thank you for all the e-mail about the book. We don't always get a chance to reply, but we have read all your letters and hope we have answered most of your questions in this second edition.

Geri Schneider Winters Santa Clara, California

Table of Contents

Foreword.

Preface to Second Edition.

Preface.

1. Getting Started.

An Iterative Software Process.

An Example Project.

The Project Description.

Starting Risk Analysis.

Chapter Review.

2. Identifying System Boundaries.

Identifying Actors.

Identifying Use Cases.

Describing Actors and Use Cases.

Handling Time.

Potential Boundary Problems.

Scoping the Project.

Chapter Review.

3. Documenting Use Cases.

The Basic Use Case.

Pre- and Postconditions.

Flow of Events.

Guidelines for Correctness and Completeness.

Presentation Styles.

Other Requirements.

Handling Complex Use Cases.

The Basic Path.

Alternative Paths.

Detailing Significant Behavior.

Documenting Alternatives.

Scenarios.

Adding Direction to the Communicates Association.

Chapter Review.

4. Advanced Use Case Documentation Techniques.

Include.

Extend.

Inheritance.

Interfaces.

Chapter Review.

5. Diagramming Use Cases.

Activity Diagrams.

Simple Sequence Diagrams.

Diagramming the User Interface.

Chapter Review.

6. Level of Detail.

Determining the Level of Detail.

Traceability between Use Cases.

Use Cases for Business Processes.

Chapter Review.

7. Documenting Use Cases.

Documentation Templates.

Other Documents.

Tool Support for Documents.

Documenting Login.

Documenting CRUD.

Chapter Review.

8. Reviews.

Review for Completeness.

Review for Potential Problems.

Review with End Users.

Review with Customers.

Review with Development.

Reviewers.

Adding Flexibility to Your System.

Common Mistakes.

Work Flow on a Use Case Diagram.

Use Cases Too Small.

Screens as Use Cases.

Using Vague Terms.

Business versus Technical Requirements.

Chapter Review.

9. Dividing Large Systems.

Architectural Patterns.

Three-Tier Architectural Pattern.

Pipe and Filter Architectural Pattern.

Object-Oriented Architectural Pattern.

Order-Processing Architecture Example.

Testing the Architecture with Use Cases.

Sequence Diagrams.

Defining Interfaces between Subsystems.

Subordinate Use Cases.

Creating Subsystem Documentation.

Subordinate versus Alternative versus Include.

Chapter Review.

10. Use Cases and the Project Plan.

Planning the Project.

Build versus Buy Decisions.

Prototyping.

Estimating Work with Use Cases.

Weighting Actors.

Weighting Use Cases.

Weighting Technical Factors.

Use Case Points.

Project Estimate.

Chapter Review.

11. Constructing and Delivering a System.

Key Abstractions of the Domain.

Identifying Key Abstractions in Use Cases.

Diagramming Scenarios with Key Abstractions.

Diagramming Key Abstractions.

Use Case versus Subsystem View.

The Iteration Schedule.

Delivery and Beyond.

User Guides and Training.

Sales Kits and Marketing Literature.

Use Cases After Delivery.

Chapter Review.

Final Wrap-Up.

Appendix A: Resources.

Appendix B: Documentation Templates.

System or Subsystem Documents.

Use Case Document.

Appendix C: UML Notation.

Appendix D: Sending Results of the Use Case Estimator.

Appendix E: Order-Processing System.

Order-Processing System.

Risk Factors.

System-Level Use Cases.

Architecture.

Index. 0201708531T04062001

Preface

There have been many changes for us and for the UML since the first edition was released in September 1998. The book has changed to stay current. The material in the first edition is also in the second edition, but you may find it in a new location. We moved the engineering-oriented material to the end of the book, and the business-oriented material to the beginning. This should make it easier for different audiences to find the material that interests them.

We updated the book to UML 1.3. A lot of the changes are in Chapters 3 and 4 because that is where we described most of the notation. The uses relationship became two relationships in UML 1.3, include and generalization. The extends relationship became extend. In both cases the notation changed as well. The definition of scenarios changed a bit too. What we used to call scenarios are now called paths.

We have added some new material that we found useful and important. Chapter 6 is a new chapter on setting the level of detail in use cases. This includes information on business process-level use cases and maintaining traceability between use cases at different levels of detail. Chapter 7, Documenting Use Cases, includes some ideas on handling login and CRUD (create, read, update, delete) in use cases. Chapter 8, Reviews, has a new section on common mistakes we have seen and how to fix them. We have included more information on sequence diagrams in Chapters 5 and 9.

There have been changes for me and Jason as well. Jason left Octel and is now a staff engineer at Cadence Design Systems. I liked having my own business, but didn't like the bookkeeping, so I took a job running the OO division of Andrews Technology, Inc. We still have Wyyzzk and Jason does some weekend consulting for that business. Things even changed on the publishing side. Addison-Wesley is now part of Pearson Education, and we have a whole new team managing the Object Technology series. They have been wonderful to work with and made the transition as smooth as possible.

One question we get asked a lot is: What do the footprints and people talking icons mean? The footprints mark major steps in the process. The people talking appear next to the storyline.

Thank you for all the e-mail about the book. We don't always get a chance to reply, but we have read all your letters and hope we have answered most of your questions in this second edition.

Geri Schneider Winters
Santa Clara, California

0201708531P04062001

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Applying Use Cases: A Practical Guide 3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 3 reviews.
bexaplex on LibraryThing 11 months ago
Applying Use Cases clearly explains a variety of use case techniques. However, almost all of those techniques are specifically not recommended by other well-rated use case books. The recommendations on making use case diagrams more readable are easy to follow, but the inscrutable diagram that results is almost worse than the starting version. A more practical guide to field-tested use case techniques would be Writing Effective Use Cases.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago