The Architect in Practice / Edition 10

The Architect in Practice / Edition 10

ISBN-10:
1405198524
ISBN-13:
9781405198523
Pub. Date:
07/13/2010
Publisher:
Wiley

Paperback

Current price is , Original price is $75.95. You
Select a Purchase Option
  • purchase options
    $56.56 $75.95 Save 26% Current price is $56.56, Original price is $75.95. You Save 26%.
  • purchase options

Overview

The Architect in Practice / Edition 10

 

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781405198523
Publisher: Wiley
Publication date: 07/13/2010
Pages: 432
Product dimensions: 6.60(w) x 9.40(h) x 0.60(d)

About the Author

David Chappell BA(Hons Arch), MA(Arch), MA(Law), PhD, RIBA with 50 years experience in the construction industry has worked as an architect in the public and private sectors and is currently Director of David Chappell Consultancy Limited. He is one of the RIBA Specialist Advisors and frequently acts as an adjudicator. He was Professor of Architectural Practice and Management Research at The Queen’s University of Belfast and Visiting Professor of Practice Management and Law at the University of Central England in Birmingham. He is author of many books for the construction industry.

Andrew Willis BSc, FRICS, FCIArb, is Managing Director of Franklin and Andrews, and is joint author of Willis’s Elements of Quantity Surveying and Specification Writing for Architects and Surveyors and was formally joint author of Practice and Procedure for the Quantity Surveyor.

Table of Contents

Preface.

Acknowledgements.

Abbreviations and Acronyms.

Part 1 Background to Practice.

1 The Construction Industry.

1.1 Introduction.

1.2 Signifi cance of the construction industry.

1.3 An ever changing industry.

1.4 Clients.

1.5 Contractors.

1.6 Consultants.

1.7 Clerk of works.

1.8 Construction industry bodies.

2 Basics.

2.1 Introduction.

2.2 From education to registration and beyond.

2.3 Routes through architectural education and training.

2.4 European Directive, content/structure of architecture programmes, modes of learning, credits/CATS/ECTS.

2.5 Approval of programmes of architectural education.

2.6 Practising architecture in the United Kingdom.

2.7 Practising architecture in Ireland.

2.8 Maintenance of standards, regulation, codes of conduct for architects.

2.9 The ARB Code: Standards of Professional Conduct and Practice.

2.10 RIBA Code of Conduct.

2.11 Continuing professional development (CPD).

2.12 Consumer protection.

3 Employment.

3.1 Introduction.

3.2 Private practice.

3.3 Local authority.

3.4 Other public sector organisations.

3.5 Large companies.

3.6 Contractors.

3.7 Manufacturers.

3.8 Teaching.

3.9 Other specialisations.

3.10 Adjudicator, arbitrator or expert witness.

4 Types of Practice.

4.1 Sole principal.

4.2 Partnership.

4.3 Unlimited liability.

4.4 Limited liability.

4.5 Public company.

4.6 Limited partnership.

4.7 Limited liability partnerships.

4.8 Co-operative.

4.9 Group practice.

4.10 Developer/architect/contractor.

5 Sources of Information.

5.1 Basic library.

5.2 Classifi cation and proprietary systems.

5.3 Information technology.

5.4 Selected project records and feedback.

5.5 Legal/administrative.

5.6 RIBA information line.

Part 2 Running a Project.

6 Stage A: Architect’s Services.

6.1 Enquiries.

6.2 Extent of services.

6.3 Fee negotiation or tendering.

6.4 Terms of appointment.

6.5 Standard forms of agreement.

6.6 Duty of care agreements (collateral warranties).

7 Stage A: Appraisal.

7.1 Feasibility studies.

7.2 Sequential framework and Plan of Work.

7.3 Site and building acquisition.

7.4 Surveys.

7.5 The brief.

7.6 Reporting.

8 Stage B: Design Brief.

8.1 Consultants.

8.2 Project managers.

8.3 Procurement paths and implications for the professional.

8.4 Guaranteed maximum price.

8.5 PFI contracts.

8.6 Partnering.

9 Stages C and D: Concept and Design Development.

9.1 Design data.

9.2 Concept design and development.

9.3 Cost estimates and planning.

9.4 Town planning applications and approvals.

9.5 Other approvals.

9.6 Property.

9.7 Contract selection and implications.

10 Stages E and F: Technical Design and Production Information.

10.1 Technical design.

10.2 Building Regulations 2000 (as amended).

10.3 Production information.

11 Stages G and H: Tender Documentation and Tender Action.

11.1 Introduction.

11.2 Co-ordinated project information.

11.3 Bills of quantities.

11.4 Specifi cations.

11.5 Schedules of work.

11.6 Activity schedules.

11.7 Tendering.

11.8 Preparing the contract documents.

12 Stages J and K: Mobilisation and Construction to Practical Completion.

12.1 Contractor's programme.

12.2 Meetings.

12.3 Site inspections.

12.4 Safety.

12.5 Architect’s instructions and variations.

12.6 Variations and their valuation.

12.7 Controlling costs.

12.8 Workmanship and materials.

12.9 Certifi cates and payments.

12.10 Delays and extensions of time.

12.11 Financial claims.

13 Stage L: Post Practical Completion.

13.1 Termination.

13.2 Practical completion.

13.3 Rectifi cation period.

13.4 Adjustment of contract sum.

13.5 Final certifi cate.

13.6 Review of project performance in use.

Part 3 General Offi ce Matters.

14 Management Principles.

14.1 Objectives.

14.2 Leadership.

14.3 Communication.

14.4 Delegation.

14.5 Motivation.

15 General Offi ce Practice.

15.1 Introduction.

15.2 Telephone, facsimile (fax) and email.

15.3 Information technology.

15.4 Letter writing.

15.5 Reports.

15.6 Filing.

15.7 Office-based meetings.

15.8 Drawing offi ce practice.

15.9 Computer-aided design.

15.10 Presentation.

15.11 Reproduction.

15.12 Work programming.

16 Finance and Accounts.

16.1 Introduction.

16.2 The accounts.

16.3 Profi t and loss account.

16.4 Balance sheet.

16.5 Assets.

16.6 Liabilities.

16.7 Capital.

16.8 Finance 342

16.9 Cash forecasting and budgeting.

16.10 Books of account.

16.11 Fee invoicing.

16.12 VAT.

16.13 Computerisation.

16.14 Annual accounts/auditing.

16.15 Staff time records.

17 Insurance.

17.1 Introduction.

17.2 Premises and contents.

17.3 Public liability.

17.4 Employer's liability.

17.5 Professional indemnity.

17.6 BUILD insurance.

17.7 Other insurances.

18 The Architect as Employee.

18.1 Finding employment.

18.2 Acceptable job titles.

18.3 Employment.

18.4 Job description.

18.5 Hours of work.

18.6 Overtime.

18.7 Salary.

18.8 Benefits.

18.9 Professional activities.

18.10 Expenses.

18.11 Leave.

18.12 Disciplinary and grievance procedure.

18.13 Notice and dismissal.

18.14 Spare-time practice.

18.15 Monitoring of telephone calls and emails.

18.16 Discrimination.

19 Attracting Work.

19.1 Active marketing.

19.2 Practice brochure.

19.3 Advertising.

19.4 Contacts.

19.5 Competitions 396

19.6 Keeping clients and recommendations.

Table of Cases.

Index.

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See All Customer Reviews