The Architect: A Novel

The Architect: A Novel

by Keith Russell Ablow
4.4 12

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Architect 4.4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 13 reviews.
bw99 More than 1 year ago
I enjoyed reading this eBook, this is one of the authors I follow. However, the presentation for this eBook was terrible. A simple spellcheck of the scanned copy would have eliminated about 90 percent of the numerous typos, misspacings and other grammatical errors I found. I could understand the text, but it made it difficult to read. Come on,BN, you can do better.
harstan More than 1 year ago
He is one of the most brilliant architects the world has ever known, a virtuoso who believes that he knows what would suit the client more than the client does. He is not listed in any phone book and most people have never heard of him. He was a member of the secret society known as the Order of Skull and Bones and gets his referrals from them through word of mouth. His talent is such that he was picked to design a new museum in the White House because the president was also a member of the secret society and trusts him implicitly. --- However, this fine architect, believing he has God¿s blessing, is also a cold blooded murderer who kills a person from his client¿s family when the victim makes the lives of their relatives miserable. Forensic psychiatrist Frank Clevenger is called in to profile this serial killer. Frank also tries to help his troubled son Billy who looks like he is going to be serving time as he battles his drinking and drug problem. --- West Crosse is one of the most sinister villains since Hannibal Lechter. What makes him so frightening is he believes he has a calling to kill those who destroy the perfection of a family and is rational enough to know that if he kills his last victim, he will die almost immediately. Frank is also at his best with his own demons and second guessing himself so he comes across as the more realistic character, one that elicits sympathy from the reader. Keith Abbot has once again shown that he is the master of the psychological thriller. --- Harriet Klausner
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TeensReadToo More than 1 year ago
Ablow's Frank Clevenger series began with an appearance by this forensic psychologist back in 1998 in Denial. In every subsequent book, we get a great thriller story interspersed with Clevenger's own personal trials, and THE ARCHITECT is no different.

The main storyline of this book, that of an architect who believes he's doing God's work by reshaping the lives of the people he builds houses for, is definitely overshadowed by the story of Clevenger himself. His own battle with alcoholism (reminiscent of that of Lawrence Block's Matthew Scudder), his on-again-off-again very realistic relationship with his FBI girlfriend, and the tightrope he walks with his adopted son, Billy, take front row.

Although the bad guy in this book keeps the story fresh and the plot intense, to me it was the underlying story of Clevenger and his life that held my real interest. I was left at the last page not with the feeling of "good, the bad guy is dead," but that of "what's going to happen to Billy?"

I guess you could say I'm hooked.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Ablow's Frank Clevenger series began with an appearance by this forensic psychologist back in 1998 in Denial. In every subsequent book, we get a great thriller story interspersed with Clevenger's own personal trials, and THE ARCHITECT is no different. The main storyline of this book, that of an architect who believes he's doing God's work by reshaping the lives of the people he builds houses for, is definitely overshadowed by the story of Clevenger himself. His own battle with alcoholism (reminiscent of that of Lawrence Block's Matthew Scudder), his on-again-off-again very realistic relationship with his FBI girlfriend, and the tightrope he walks with his adopted son, Billy, take front row. Although the bad guy in this book keeps the story fresh and the plot intense, to me it was the underlying story of Clevenger and his life that held my real interest. I was left at the last page not with the feeling of 'good, the bad guy is dead,' but that of 'what's going to happen to Billy?' I guess you could say I'm hooked.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I really enjoyed feeling Clevenger's pain throughout the book. i was able to relate to him on a more personal level becuase as a regular person, i have some of the same thoughts he has. in between each intense scene you were thrown from page to page with details leading to the next detailed 'work of art'
Guest More than 1 year ago
This book seemed promising for a thrilling reading experience. It was a good story but it should have had more depth and discription. It seemed a little to basic to be a thriller but I would consider it a good read.