The Art of Detection (Kate Martinelli Series #5)

The Art of Detection (Kate Martinelli Series #5)

by Laurie R. King
3.6 28

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Overview

The Art of Detection (Kate Martinelli Series #5) by Laurie R. King

In this thrilling new crime novel that ingeniously bridges Laurie R. King’s Edgar and Creasey Awards—winning Kate Martinelli series and her bestselling series starring Mary Russell, San Francisco homicide detective Kate Martinelli crosses paths with Sherlock Holmes–in a spellbinding dual mystery that could come only from the “intelligent, witty, and complex” mind of New York Times bestselling author Laurie R. King….

Kate Martinelli has seen her share of peculiar things as a San Francisco cop, but never anything quite like this: an ornate Victorian sitting room straight out of a Sherlock Holmes story–complete with violin, tobacco-filled Persian slipper, and gunshots in the wallpaper that spell out the initials of the late queen.

Philip Gilbert was a true Holmes fanatic, from his antiquated décor to his vintage wardrobe. And no mere fan of fiction’s great detective, but a leading expert with a collection of priceless memorabilia–a collection some would kill for.

And perhaps someone did: In his collection is a century-old manuscript purportedly written by Holmes himself–a manuscript that eerily echoes details of Gilbert’s own murder.

Now, with the help of her partner, Al Hawkin, Kate must follow the convoluted trail of a killer–one who may have trained at the feet of the greatest mind of all times.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780553588330
Publisher: Random House Publishing Group
Publication date: 05/29/2007
Series: Kate Martinelli Series , #5
Edition description: Reprint
Pages: 528
Sales rank: 274,442
Product dimensions: 4.24(w) x 6.86(h) x 1.08(d)

About the Author

Laurie R. King is the New York Times bestselling author of thirteen Mary Russell mysteries, five contemporary novels featuring Kate Martinelli, the Stuyvesant & Grey novels Touchstone and The Bones of Paris, and the acclaimed A Darker Place, Folly, and Keeping Watch. She lives in Northern California.

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Art of Detection (Kate Martinelli Series #5) 3.6 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 28 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Fans of Laurie R King should cheer for this long-awaited Kate Martinelli book. Once again, King has captured the reality of police investigation: sometimes drudgery, sometimes frustrating but always necessary. In this book (set in modern San Francisco) King has seamlessly woven threads from her marvelous Mary Russell series into the Martinelli mystery. The murder of dedicated Sherlockian Philip Gilbert has Kate (and partner Al Hawkin) investigating not only all over San Francisco proper, but in the Marin headlands as well. In the course of the investigation an old manuscript surfaces: collector Gilbert thought it an original Conan Doyle story of Holmes in San Francisco. The release of this manuscript could turn the literary world on it¿s ear if authentic. Is it motive enough for murder? The motive question gets answered handily, The authenticity one does not. Fortunately, no fan of the Russell series needs it to be. One page into the manuscript tells us all we need to know about its origins. King has again presented us with honest, human three-dimensional characters with real lives, real concerns and real joys. Run, don¿t walk, to the bookstore for this one!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
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Anonymous More than 1 year ago
we are NOT evil! Have you not learned anything?! Your the evi one! As soon as your done with bloodclan youll target every othrr clan just so others can see your powerful! But your not! This is useless and stupid!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
She walks in silently, peering around and asks "This is the detective agenecy, correct?"
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
As a huge Laurie R. King fan, I enjoyed this book, though it wasn't as good as her others, probably because it didn't flow as smoothly. I normally give King's novels a 4.5-5 rating. I'd give this 3.5-4. IF you've read other books in the Karte Martinelli series, you will probably enjoy this one. If you haven't, I would recommend starting with the first book in the series, "A Grave Talent." IF you are a Sherlock Holmes purist, you might not like this, because King introduces a previously unknown manuscript that may or may not expand on the Holmes legend. Otherwise, she does stick to the "facts" in Holmes matters. If you read Sherlock Holmes stories, but aren't a purist, you might find this intriguing. IF you don't like reading about LGBT characters and lifestyles, you won't like this. IF you're looking for a "cozy," don't pick this. King's books are intelligent, creative, well researched, well written, with good character depth. There is minimal sex, swearing, or gore. Her character development in this book is weak, relying more on readers' knowledge of the characters from previous books in the series. The plot involves a completely separate mystery within the primary mystery. The mysteries are intriguing and the detective work realistic. The passages about the second mystery are long, which is why the book doesn't flow as smoothly as most King novels. JB
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
A literary device i care for a story within a story. This therefore has three mysteries going present a past mystery and a third story about the doyle manuscript plus the personal family
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
interesting twist on Sherlock Holmes legends. Well written as are all of her books..
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Anonymous More than 1 year ago
The characters in this mystery series are so fully developed that following them is part of the pleasure of reading these books, but this plot would be engaging even for those who aren't regular readers of the series. Kate, a detective in San Francisco, is a likable protagonist investigating the mysterious death of a man who was obsessed with Sherlock Holmes. The death seems to parallel that of a character in a manuscript that just might be a newly-found Conan Doyle story. King skillfjully weaves many mysteries together and brings them all together in a satisfying conclusion.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
... her protagonist's personal life is both distracting and unrealistic. If you've read any of this series, you know that Kate'sworld is almost entirely composed of gay and otherwise oddly blended groups of people. Even in San Fran, I find it very unlikely that everyone, especially in a police department, is gay. And when she does occasionally have a more usual pairing of characters, she usually paints them as "wrong"in some way. I find her obvious bias offensive. And the idea that Doyle would write sympathetically about a transvestite is simply ludicrous. She herself provides all the reasons that it is not plausible.
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ilovemy3cs More than 1 year ago
A possible Conan Doyle manuscript becomes the center of this modern day murder mystery. I would have to say the story in the manuscript held my attention more than the murder the book was actually about, but in all I found the story entertaining and worth the time it took to read. This was my first Laurie King book and I am likely to pick up another.
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KrisPA More than 1 year ago
In order to enjoy this (last?) Kate Martinelli novel, you have to be a fan of Sherlock Holmes or at least familiar with the Holmes mysteries. I am neither, and did not enjoy this novel at all. It's ironic because in my reviews of her other books I complained that she ended the novels too abruptly and didn't provide more comprehensive conclusions. This novel has a very gradual, long ending that wraps everything up very neatly which is funny because I wanted this book to end more quickly! I just couldn't get into this book. It moved way too slowly until I didn't care who "did it" and almost skipped to the end so I could be done with it. The author is obviously a huge fan of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle and the Sherlock Holmes mysteries. Her interest in Sherlock Holmes was a detriment to the book because the solving of the crime took a backseat to an exploration of the Sherlock Holmes world ("Sherlockians"). The mysterious novella that may have been written by Doyle did play a part in solving the mystery, but did she have to literally include the text of this novella within the pages of her novel? I skipped those chapters because I didn't think reading it would be important, and it isn't (so skip it if you want to). Once fully revealed, the plot itself (the reason for the murder) was boringly mundane and disappointing. And the very end just didn't work for me either.(SPOILER--this has nothing to do with the mystery of the novel but with the lives of Lee and Kate, but maybe you'll want to be surprised. But if you watch the news, and know anything about San Francisco, you won't be surprised. I sure wasn't). During the novel (or the series of novels) there are no mentions (or rarely) of gay rights or that sort of thing. Lee and Kate are a couple and consider themselves married, and I accept that and don't think anything else about it. So at the end of this novel when they go to city hall to be legally married, it was kind of anti-climatic and weird. I felt that way for many reasons, one of which is I don't feel particularly close to the main characters and while I want good things to happen to them, I won't miss them now that I am done with the series (and I didn't like any of the books enough to want to read them again), another reason I felt this way is because the book was published in 2006 and the legalization of marriage (and undoing of that by CA voters) is kinda old news and maybe not as surprising or shocking as it would have been when the book was written. I just didn't find Lee and Kate's legal marriage all that interesting. If the author had written one of the characters to be more active in gay rights or had brought up the idea that Lee's hospital/physical therapy bills would have been covered under Kate's insurance if they were able to legally wed, then I would have been more involved/interested in the news of their wedding. Because I (as an engaged heterosexual) think everyone should be able to get married and receive the legal benefits of marriage. So, if the marriage thing had been presented better (more build up?) I would have been very excited for them. King (for me) didn't do a good job of combining her characters' lives and the mysteries. I really cared more about the mysteries. One thing I did like is how much San Francisco is present in the novel (and all of them). I have never been there and appreciate the author making the city another character in the novel.
djwpar_2000 More than 1 year ago
Good Laurie King book..Not as good as some of the other Kate Martinelli books but very good.