Ask the Dust

Ask the Dust

by John Fante
4.1 24

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Overview

Ask the Dust by John Fante

Ask the Dust is a virtuoso performance by an influential master of the twentieth-century American novel. It is the story of Arturo Bandini, a young writer in 1930s Los Angeles who falls hard for the elusive, mocking, unstable Camilla Lopez, a Mexican waitress. Struggling to survive, he perseveres until, at last, his first novel is published. But the bright light of success is extinguished when Camilla has a nervous breakdown and disappears . . . and Bandini forever rejects the writer's life he fought so hard to attain.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780876854433
Publisher: HarperCollins Publishers
Publication date: 06/01/1980
Pages: 165
Product dimensions: 5.88(w) x 9.04(h) x 0.45(d)

About the Author

John Fante began writing in 1929 and published his first short story in 1932. His first novel, Wait Until Spring, Bandini, was published in 1938 and was the first of his Arturo Bandini series of novels, which also include The Road to Los Angeles and Ask the Dust. A prolific screenwriter, he was stricken with diabetes in 1955. Complications from the disease brought about his blindness in 1978 and, within two years, the amputation of both legs. He continued to write by dictation to his wife, Joyce, and published Dreams from Bunker Hill, the final installment of the Arturo Bandini series, in 1982. He died on May 8, 1983, at the age of seventy-four.

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Ask the Dust 4.1 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 24 reviews.
Ronald_De_La_O More than 1 year ago
After being out of print for so long, I searched old bookstore for any of Fante's books, having been told of him by others. These are important works and I am thrilled that they are finally available to a new audience. Bandini is a great character with an interesting story arc throughout the series, I won't spoil it by describing it any more than that, you need to experience the life for yourself.Then read Dan Fante, his son and a great author not to be missed.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I don't even know what to write. My roommate thinks I'm insane from laughing out loud at this book time after time. It will grab you by the face and make you chew until you've digested every word. I was reading some article on Bukowski that cross referenced this book, so I had to pick it up. I just picked up 'The Road to Los Angeles' and it's already got me. Arturo Bandini, lover, poet, madman. You gotta check this guy out.
Regina-SmartA More than 1 year ago
From dust to dust, I guess you can say. This is really a sad love story about a man who thinks the most important thing in life is being a famous writer. Then he meets a waitress, and we realize that deep down, more than anything else, he really wants love. But the woman he loves is a junkie, and that's the tragedy. He'll never have the real thing that would give his life meaning. I love this book. The sad ending. The style of writing. Of course I found this book through reading Charles Bukowski and he mentions this title. Great book. Recommended. I just came off reading another novel about drug abusers, Permanent Obscurity. Weird, but this book was the perfect follow up. If you like Charles Bukowski or Richard Perez, you'll really like this.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I had to read this for my english class so initially I wasn't interested. After reading it I can say I really enjoyed it and I will be buying the other books about Arturo Bandini.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Don't see why it is so highly rated by some though.
David Yu More than 1 year ago
Another+great+classic+coming+from+L.A.+John+Fante+is+very+talented%2Cthe+book+is+very+well+written+yet+it+was+piblished+back+in+the+1930s.Shows+how+the+challenges+we+have+today+was+almost+no+different+then.Highly+recommend+thid+book+to+those+who+love+Charles+Bukowski..
Guest More than 1 year ago
Fante's characters are starving during the depression, but so is his story. It adds up to little, and his people are unattractive and unbalanced. Best read as a historical curiosity.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Compared to 'The Road to Los Angeles,' this book was mediocre. I like Bandinni, but the book was rather a bore. The waitress bored me, the earthquake bored me and so on. 'The Road to Los Angeles,' which I believe was his first book, kicked some serious Bandinni.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Took a recommendation from Charles B.. He was spot on. Fante is the real deal
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I purchased this book based on a review on the National Public Radio web site. It certainly is everything that the review promised. It¿s well written. The setting, characters and situations really draw you in. My problem is with the protagonist. Arturo Bandini is an adolescent, self destructive, misogynist, doofus. Maybe Bandini finds enlightenment and escapes his pathetic, pointless way of life in the end. But Fante provides no basis for the reader to care about the protagonist one way or the other. And, I don¿t. I wished him luck and stopped reading around chapter five.
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Guest More than 1 year ago
Oh what a treat our little Fante provides for us with this mis-en-scene slice of life from early twentieth century Los Angeles. This was one of Bukowski's favorites and how delightful! Such a shame Jean Genet was lounging round those catwalks in Aix-en-provence or he would have blown his little load getting his greedy hands on this stuff. Then of course, Burroughs may have sufficed. Oh my land, oh my land! What a queer little sultry thing Fante has done here- though generally he has little coutere.