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Ask the Past: Pertinent and Impertinent Advice from Yesteryear
     

Ask the Past: Pertinent and Impertinent Advice from Yesteryear

5.0 2
by Elizabeth P. Archibald
 

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Want to know how to garden with lobsters? How to sober up? Grow a beard? Or simply how to make a perfect omelet? Look no further. Rather, look backward.

Based on the popular blog, Ask the Past is full of the wisdom of the ages—as well as the fad diets, zany pickup lines, and bacon Band-Aids of the ages. Drawn from centuries of antique texts by

Overview

Want to know how to garden with lobsters? How to sober up? Grow a beard? Or simply how to make a perfect omelet? Look no further. Rather, look backward.

Based on the popular blog, Ask the Past is full of the wisdom of the ages—as well as the fad diets, zany pickup lines, and bacon Band-Aids of the ages. Drawn from centuries of antique texts by historian and bibliophile Elizabeth P. Archibald, Ask the Past offers a delightful array of advice both wise and weird.

Whether it's eighteenth-century bedbug advice (sprinkle bed with gunpowder and let smolder), budget fashion tips of the Middle Ages (save on the clothes, splurge on the purse) or a sixteenth-century primer on seduction (hint: do no pass gas), Ask the Past is a wildly entertaining guide to life from the people who lived it first.

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
"Lucky for her readers, Archibald has a wry wit and keen eye for absurdity. Some of the book's advice makes the past feel very far away...but much of it reminds of what we have in common with our ancestors, who also worried about attracting lovers, raising children, and killing bedbugs (the secret is gunpowder)."—Boston Globe"

Comical and illuminating."—Johns Hopkins Magazine

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780316298896
Publisher:
Hyperion
Publication date:
05/05/2015
Pages:
304
Sales rank:
854,037
Product dimensions:
7.10(w) x 5.50(h) x 1.00(d)

Meet the Author

Yale-educated historian Elizabeth P. Archibald is an instructor at the Peabody Institute of Johns Hopkins. Her research focuses on the history of education from antiquity to the Renaissance, as well as the history of books. She launched the blog Ask the Past in 2013.

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Ask the Past: Pertinent and Impertinent Advice from Yesteryear 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 2 reviews.
MorrisMorgan More than 1 year ago
Historian Elizabeth P. Archibald does a wonderful job in “Ask the Past” of showing that history can be fun and entertaining.  Her collection of some of the best/worst excerpts from antique etiquette and advice books and pamphlets, along with accompanying illustrations, had me laughing so hard that I could not breathe.  Her snarky “translations” at the end of each excerpt doubled the entertainment value. Aside from being entertaining, her introduction breaks down her research methods in a way that will help novice historians learn how to take tiny bits of information and use it to get an overall picture of the society of the time. Also, I would like to note that I am forever grateful to the person who established that it is not appropriate to attack someone who is defecating.  Where would we be as a society if that was still an acceptable practice? “Ask the Past” is the perfect gift for anyone old enough for fart and sex jokes made classier through Old English. This review is based upon a complimentary copy provided by the publisher in exchange for an honest review.
gaele More than 1 year ago
AudioBook Review: Stars Overall 5 Narration 5 Story 5 Ever wonder if the ‘rules’ or advice given to your grandmother was different from that given to her grandmother? How have rules for behaving in school changed? What about getting rid of that pesky hangover or how to talk to the new cute neighbor, remove a stain, or perhaps even how to tell a joke? This is the book for you. Advice, information and humor all mix together to bring this series of facts from useful to ridiculous from the actual pamphlets and books that were ‘al the rage’ of their day. Adding to the delight in some of the proclamations is the authors ‘translation’ of the advice – often snarky, always funny and completely spot on. It feels wrong to me to call this non-fiction: but the clear explanation of how these facts and advice were culled from actual works, but I don’t think that the original authors ever thought they would be so much fun! Narration for this little gem is provided by Graeme Malcolm and Elizabeth Archibald in a wonderfully unique style. Malcolm with his solid broadcaster’s voice, clear diction and rather ‘take charge’ tone dispenses the actual advice. This is then followed by Archibald presenting her ‘asides and translations’, and it honestly is a toss-up which is funnier. This is, hands down, the funniest collection of advice and etiquette I have ever encountered. I received an AudioBook copy of the title from Hachette Audio for purpose of honest review. I was not compensated for this review: all conclusions are my own responsibility.