Astronomy (DK Eyewitness Books Series)

Astronomy (DK Eyewitness Books Series)

by Kristen Lippincott

Hardcover

$16.99
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Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781465408952
Publisher: DK
Publication date: 07/01/2013
Series: DK Eyewitness Books Series
Pages: 72
Sales rank: 153,580
Product dimensions: 8.60(w) x 11.20(h) x 0.60(d)
Age Range: 8 - 12 Years

About the Author

Kristen Lippincott is the author of Astronomy and a coauthor of Space Explorer (with Robin Kerrod, Jacqueline Mitton, Stuart Murray, and Carole Stott). Lippincott is a museum consultant and art historian. She was the deputy director of the National Maritime Museum from 2000 to 2006. Previously she was the director of the Royal Observatory, Greenwich, from 1998 to 2001.

Table of Contents

The study of the heavens6
Ancient astronomy8
Ordering the Universe10
The celestial sphere12
The uses of astronomy14
Astrology16
The Copernican revolution18
Intellectual giants20
Optical principles22
The optical telescope24
Observatories26
The astronomer28
Spectroscopy30
The radio telescope32
Venturing into space34
The Solar System36
The Sun38
The Moon40
The Earth42
Mercury44
Venus46
Mars48
Jupiter50
Saturn52
Uranus54
Neptune and Pluto56
Travelers in space58
The birth and death of stars60
Our galaxy and beyond62
Did you know?64
Cutting-edge astronomy66
Find out more68
Glossary70
Index72

Customer Reviews

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ASTRONOMY 3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 2 reviews.
Anonymous 26 days ago
For young people who love and enjoy reading about space-related condepts, I recommend this book. It is not for the slightly interested. That said, my son loves it - and explicitly asked for the DK book.
sweetiegherkin on LibraryThing 5 months ago
This book, part of the DK Eyewitness series, provides an overview of the study of outer space, starting with ancient astronomy and moving to the present day, even including a few expected events to look for (such as the collection of more knowledge about Pluto when a spacecraft sent there three years ago returns in 2015). Each spread contains a topic heading, a brief narrative describing that topic, and then a number of color illustrations (including photographs and artists¿ renderings) with detailed captions. The book concludes with some fast facts, ways to find out more information (including places to visit, such as science museums and planetariums), a glossary, and an index. This all sounds great, but I ended up giving the book such a low rating because I found it to be so unreadable. For starters, I found the spreads distracting, with far too much information competing for my attention. I couldn¿t figure out what to read next in terms of the captions because sometimes there seemed to be a logical order and other times there did not seemed to be any order. Also, the content sometimes seemed very technical for a survey text intended for children. For instance, the book mentions volume, mass, and density many times in the beginning half of the book before finally explaining these concepts on page 45 (and for the record, no, these terms are not included in the glossary). Also, the captions include such information as Pierre Simon Laplace¿s work Traite de mechanique celeste and Urbain Le Verrier¿s job at the Ecole Polytechnique without bothering to translate these words into English. For someone like me, who has at least a basic understanding of French, this is not a problem, but does the author really expect a broad audience of English-speaking children to understand? Overall, I was disappointed in this work and wouldn¿t recommend it for any but the most devoted to science.