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At Dawn We Slept: The Untold Story of Pearl Harbor
     

At Dawn We Slept: The Untold Story of Pearl Harbor

4.8 17
by Gordon William Prange, Katherine V. Dillon, Donald M. Goldstein
 

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Fifty years after the attack that plunged America into World War II, At Dawn We Slept remains the greatest account of Pearl Harbor ever written.

This gripping study scrupulously reconstructs the Japanese attack, from its conception (less than a year before the actual raid) to its lightning execution; and it reveals the true reason for the American debacle: the

Overview

Fifty years after the attack that plunged America into World War II, At Dawn We Slept remains the greatest account of Pearl Harbor ever written.

This gripping study scrupulously reconstructs the Japanese attack, from its conception (less than a year before the actual raid) to its lightning execution; and it reveals the true reason for the American debacle: the insurmountable disbelief in the Japanese threat that kept America from heeding advance warnings and caused leaders to ignore evidence submitted by our own intelligence sources.

Based on thirty-seven years of intense research and countless interviews, and incorporating previously untranslated documents, At Dawn We Slept is history with the dramatic sweep of a martial epic.

Editorial Reviews

Chicago Sun-Times
Diligent, thorough, and evenhanded...At Dawn We Slept is the definitive account of Pearl Harbor.
New York Times Book Review
Prange's exhaustive interviews of people on both sides enable him to tell the story in such personal terms that the reader is bound to feel its power....It is impossible to forget such an account.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780140064551
Publisher:
Penguin Group (USA) Incorporated
Publication date:
12/07/1982
Pages:
910
Product dimensions:
7.00(w) x 5.00(h) x 1.00(d)

Meet the Author

Gordon W. Prange (1910-1980) served during World War II as an officer in the naval reserve and, during the occupation of Japan, served in the General Headquarters as a civilian. He was chief of General Douglas McArthur's G-2 Historical Section and director of the Military History Section. He taught history at the University of Maryland from 1937 until his death.

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At Dawn We Slept 4.3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 3 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
At Dawn We Slept tells the complete tale of the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor from its inception through its completion, and the aftermath for both sides in this conflict. It examines the planning stages of the raid on the Japanese end and explains the point of view for each of the major players in this drama. An exceptional amount of time is given to the interrelationships of Admiral Yamamoto, General Tojo, the Emperor, and Japanese politics in the ultimate decision to proceed along the path to war. The author examines the role of such well-known figures as Admiral Kimmel, General Short, Secretary Hull, Ambassador Grew and President Roosevelt. He doesn't stop at this point, but instead follows up with reviews of personnel at all ranks and positions in the armed forces. Prange attempts to determine or stipulate who really was to blame? In this aspect, the War Department and the commanders, Kimmel and Short, are held responsible. Prange comes down hard on the War Department for failing to notify the commanders of the intercepted 'bomb plot' message. Kimmel and Short both grossly misinterpreted the 'War Warning' message dated November 27, 1941, sent to them by Washington. Kimmell, the naval commander, felt that the security of the base was all up to the Army (which was true), while Short, the commander of the Army felt that the Navy was supposed to provide the long range reconnaissance (which was also true). Both commanders kept asking Washington for more planes and personnel, all the while Kimmell was losing ships to the war in the Atlantic. Short only alerted his troops against possible sabotage and maintained his training schedule, which was so routine that few initially believed the attack was real. This is an excellent book that examines the background to the Pearl Harbor attack, and does not detail the attack itself. This book takes an in depth look at the men and the assumptions that made Pearl Harbor. But be warned, it is very wordy and a task in of itself to read. At over 800 pages all said and done, with more names than one can reasonably remember, it is highly recommended that you take notes on the key players for a reference while reading. In all, a must read historical account at what could easily repeat itself in today¿s world of terrorism and you will quickly recognize that the same flaws that led to this attack exist in every government agency today. An eye opener (once you¿re done reading it...) that anyone who works in security of our nation should read.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This book is a wonderful overview of Pearl Harbor. It has great detail of incident and actually made me cry more than a few times. It really makes me think about what those people had to go through.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I found this 'historical novel' to be fascinating. I have seen several movies and several commentaries on the attack of Pearl harbor, but this read actually has taken these mediums to an all time high. The attack on American soil is by far the most incredible event I believe to have ever happened in the United States. It was the largest eye opener to Americans that we could easily fall victim to complacency. An event that will never be forgotten, the United States had everything we could have had for the prevention and sustainment of such a fight, but enemy speed and violence in attack would be our competitor and we were slow out of the gate. The Japanese sent us a message. I find it absolutely amazing that 50 plus years later we are still naive to the fact that we have to keep history from repeating itself. We cannot afford to make the same mistakes. Our intelligence drives our operations and the smallest of details cannot be overlooked. The authors were very lengthy in the details of each party, but the overall read was great.