At Least in the City Someone Would Hear Me Scream: Misadventures in Search of the Simple Life

At Least in the City Someone Would Hear Me Scream: Misadventures in Search of the Simple Life

by Wade Rouse
3.7 26

Hardcover

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Overview

At Least in the City Someone Would Hear Me Scream: Misadventures in Search of the Simple Life by Wade Rouse

We all dream it.
Wade Rouse actually did it.

Finally fed up with the frenzy of city life and a job he hates, Wade Rouse decided to make either the bravest decision of his life or the worst mistake since his botched Ogilvie home perm: to uproot his life and try, as Thoreau did some 160 years earlier, to "live a plain, simple life in radically reduced conditions."

In this rollicking and hilarious memoir, Wade and his partner, Gary, leave culture, cable, and consumerism behind and strike out for rural Michigan–a place with fewer people than in their former spinning class. There, Wade discovers the simple life isn’t so simple. Battling blizzards, bloodthirsty critters, and nosy neighbors equipped with night-vision goggles, Wade and his spirit, sanity, relationship, and Kenneth Cole pointy-toed boots are sorely tested with humorous and humiliating frequency. And though he never does learn where his well water actually comes from or how to survive without Kashi cereal, he does discover some things in the woods outside his knotty-pine cottage in Saugatuck, Michigan, that he always dreamed of but never imagined he’d find–happiness and a home.

At Least in the City Someone Would Hear Me Scream is a sidesplitting and heartwarming look at taking a risk, fulfilling a dream, and finding a home–with very thick and very dark curtains.

From the Hardcover edition.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780307451903
Publisher: Crown/Archetype
Publication date: 06/02/2009
Pages: 320
Product dimensions: 6.40(w) x 9.30(h) x 1.20(d)

About the Author

WADE ROUSE is a writer living on the coast of Michigan. A graduate of Drury and Northwestern universities, he is the critically acclaimed author of the memoirs America’s Boy and Confessions of a Prep School Mommy Handler and a contributor to The Customer Is Always Wrong: The Retail Chronicles. His essays have been published in numerous national magazines and collections.

From the Hardcover edition.

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At Least in the City Someone Would Hear Me Scream: Misadventures in Search of the Simple Life 3.8 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 26 reviews.
Lizzie_L More than 1 year ago
There is a scene in the book where the author describes going to a dinner party and becoming depressed when he realized that his aspirations of being a writer and writing a memoir about growing up gay (which is not this book, but another of his memoirs) made him one of many in the same room who were doing the same and also fancied themselves writers. This is an apt section to describe this book because it has nothing original, compelling, unusually funny or interesting in it that would separate it from anyone else's stories as well as the fact that the quality of writing is on par with a high school freshman, which is to say that I believe almost any reasonably literate person could churn out something of this quality. The writing is not bad, I guess, it is just not of the quality that I expect of published authors. It reads like your average blog or as I mentioned above, the kind of writing you would get from a high school paper. This book has many, many flaws but the two that stand out are: 1. it is billed as being "hysterical" and even the parts that are clearly supposed to be funny (like the opening passage where the author encounters a raccoon) are really not that funny, and 2. as another reviewer mentioned, the author CONSTANTLY, and I do mean constantly, talks about the expensive things he has/likes/wants/used to enjoy. Even putting commentary about how this reflects on him as a person aside, it is just SO REPETITIVE and distracting. It feels as rants about the virtues of buying expensive jeans and such are just used as filler in order to stretch this tale into a book of reasonable length instead of the short story, essay or blog entry that would have more than sufficed to tell this tale.
JennGauthier More than 1 year ago
I read this book over the last couple of days, and I'm still trying to figure out what, exactly, was the point. Because as far as I can see, Rouse wrote an entire book simply to brag about the fact that he can afford to buy a $500 scarf and $300 face cream, and that this makes him far superior to those who cannot afford such things, and that he should be recommended for sainthood for deigning to live with such uncultured swine. Oh, and that all people who live in the flyover states hate gays and want to kill them. Perhaps if the author seemed to have an education above and beyond what you get in a standard high school, or could expound intelligently on art or music or literature or anything at all of meaning, the book might have had at least one redeeming quality. But all he talks about is how he yearns for overpriced clothing, how much he loves overpriced coffee, and the evils of hick-filled Walmarts everywhere (though, apparently, if your sweatshop, child labor produced clothing is a luxury brand, that makes it all okay). Hopefully Rouse has learned a bit more at this point from living in Michigan, because if he still wanders around thinking about how deep and soulful he is for living amongst the homophobic neanderthals, he really has missed the entire point. As does his book.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I read a book by this author, liked it and immediately bought this one. That was a mistake because trying to read back to back books by Mr. Rouse is too much. His narrative is becoming annoying, he brings up David Sedaris, which is unfortunate because it made me miss his witty writing.The book is OK, just know this author can grate on your nerves after about 100 pages.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Very entertaining and hilarious tale; a must-read for Michigan residents in the Holland-Saugatuck area. Hearing Wade read excerpts in person was also a highlight I wish could accompany the book.
Bookish1KP More than 1 year ago
Not worth your time
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KimberleyNC More than 1 year ago
Disclaimer: I grew up in Holland, and spent summers during my college years, and after, in Saugatuck, where much of the memoir takes place. This book is a refreshing departure from most memoirs. Wade can laugh at himself, which not so many of us can do, and he does this a lot! It can't be easy for a city boy to move to the country, even though Saugatuck us a great summer town filled with boutiques, art galleries, and charming restaurants, set on the water. Still...Wade never gives up, and I imagine his sense of humor, and ability to persevere make it possible. I'm now reading "It's All Relative" and loving every minute of it.
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Laugh out loud but sincere at the same time. Great imagery and so well written I felt as if I was in the cabin and going through the same life challenges.
Joannwil More than 1 year ago
I especially enjoyed this because I live near St. Louis and I have been to the place in Michigan they moved to. I've often thought, given the finances, I'd love to do what they did.
EAN More than 1 year ago
Totally entertaining!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Great book by a talented writer. Wade Rouse's confident ability to lay himself open for all to see gives readers a raucous opportunity to enjoy his journey. Following your dreams can be daunting, but this dream-seeker has me wrapped around his finger. I almost enjoyed this as much as his first memoir, "America's Boy," but that would be impossible as "AB" ousted other contenders for the spot as my favorite book. Too bad I read this so fast, now I have to wait for Rouse's next installment...patience is hard.