The Attenbury Emeralds (Lord Peter Wimsey/Harriet Vane Series)

The Attenbury Emeralds (Lord Peter Wimsey/Harriet Vane Series)

by Jill Paton Walsh
4.0 33

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The Attenbury Emeralds (Lord Peter Wimsey/Harriet Vane Series) 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 33 reviews.
tainc More than 1 year ago
I love these characters and Ms. Walsh does a credible job of expanding the Wimsey universe. The story is absorbing and she hints at the atmosphere of an England after the war. But...she is not quite Dorothy Sayers. The depth of character that Sayers brings to both Harriet and Peter isn't quite there. Ms. Walsh prefers her characters vocalize all of their feelings where Ms. Sayers would expound on them. Yes, it would slow the books down (Has any one ready Gaudy Night lately) but it gave you a true understanding of how the character thought and felt. There were a few passages [describing how Bunter and Peter went to a dinner party as equals, the description of Gerald and his wife at the Attenbury party, the Dowager Dutchess), where I think Ms. Sayers would have written more. Plus the use of a large font is a bit of cheat because it makes the book much longer than it needs to me. But for pure entertainment that is fun to read, I'd rate it five stars.
srj More than 1 year ago
The Attenbury Emeralds offers both backstory and benediction to the Lord Peter corpus. If also interested in the audio version, Edward Petherbridge does a magnificent job bringing the characters to life.
WaukeshaPhoenix More than 1 year ago
Not since the death of William Buckley have I had to utilize a dictionary with the frequency of this very well written book. Aside from the vocabulary the writing style brings to life post-WWII England still hanging on to its recent Victorian heritage. A marvelous time piece and an excellent mystery rides along in the historical setting. The read is a bit slower because of the particulars of language usage. But it is an enjoyable ride you really do not wish to end.
harstan More than 1 year ago
In 1951, Harriet Vane and her husband Lord Peter Wimsey leisurely eat breakfast while reading the newspaper. Harriet peruses Lord Attenbury Arthur Abcock's obituary, which mentions the Attenbury emeralds. Peter knows first-hand about the infamous emeralds that was the motive of his first detective investigation. He and his manservant Mervyn Bunter tell Harriet what happened in 1921 when the Attenbury emeralds vanished and Lord Peter solving the case. As they complete their tale of exotic thievery, Lord Attenbury's grandson Edward arrives. He asks Lord Peter to help solve a new problem involving the family emeralds. Peter accompanied by Harriet and of course Bunter, investigates as thefts and murder abound. Jill Paton Walsh's latest Wimsey-Vane (see A Presumption of Death) captures the essences of Dorothy L. Sayer's great detective while bringing her own spin to the story line; in other words this is not Sayer's light, but instead a homage to the great writer in Ms. Walsh's style. The story line captures two historical post world war eras in Great Britain that enables the audience to compare how society adjusted to peace in their times. Fast-paced, readers will enjoy the doting father of teens on an investigation accompanied by his wife and his manservant. Harriet Klausner
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Good
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
prussblue10 More than 1 year ago
Having now read all of the Lord Peter Wimsey titles, I feel that J.P. Walsh has not failed the late Dorothy L. Sayers in writing a novel *based upon* Sayers' characters. It takes from Peter's past and brings them (the Wimsey Cohort) to post war (WWII) England in a most unusual way. It was a great read!
Deacon_Tate More than 1 year ago
I found this to be a good contribution to the series. I enjoyed the explanation that gave insight into Lord Peter's early times following the Great War. And the continuation into the post WWII times. The continued development of Lord Peter and Lady Peter Wimsey, Bunter and the rest of the those who make up the people we all know I am pleased to read. I hope that Jill Paton Walsh will be able to continue to allow us to visit with them all.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
It's been far too long since Ms Walsh wrote a Peter Wimsey & Harriet Vane book. I'm glad she's back & hope she writes many more. She's picked up Dorothy Sayers' ball extremely well.
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keknolle More than 1 year ago
Great read!! I recommend. Jill P. Walsh has done a terrific job following up with the Wimsey series.
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MayaMA More than 1 year ago
I am now around the same age as Peter is the the Attenbury Emeralds, I've been reading Sayers since my teens and Walsh her first Wimsey. (And I have cats named Lord Peter, Harriet and Mr. Bunter!) I give this one five stars for what it is: A updated, faster paced Wimsey. If I were comparing it to Sayers herself, I would probably give it one less star. The reason was expressed by an earlier reviewer, that it lacks some of the detail and meanderings of Sayers. And yes, I have just re-read Busman's Honeymoon. One of the interesting and, I think, difficult things about writing this sequal which is set in 1950 or 1951, is the need to incorporate the societal changes into a pre-war framework we Wimsey/Sayers fans love. I spent my teen years wishing I had a Bunter. The Second World War is still fresh in everyone's mind and it has changed the world much more than WWI which Wimsey and Bunter also experineced. It is hard to change the framework in which one has lived life for so many years. Walsh tries to do this by having the story of the 1921 adventure begin the book. I do wish that Walsh had written more about the Bunters and how they felt about what was happending as I think that would add to our understanding of the changes taking place. Finally, I would like to see one more book about Peter and Harriet as their Graces. I know that Peter will recover financially - maybe with the assistance of Peter Bunter?
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