Auralia's Colors

Auralia's Colors

by Jeffrey Overstreet
3.6 91

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Auralia's Colors 3.6 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 91 reviews.
lost_in_pages More than 1 year ago
Poetic World In spite of not really liking the book all that much, I have to admit that the world is poetically interesting. The characters and story are unusual. I liked the foundation of the story and world, but I couldn't engage with the magical realism. For example, I read it several years ago, but it still bothers me that Auralia's leaf shoes were green, or that she used flower petals for clothes. As a kid who played with making things out of whatever weeds grew in the lot next door, I know how fast leaves turn brown. I simply couldn't participate in the poetry of the fantasy. At the same, I think it says something that I still think about the novel years later. If you read a sample and it doesn't draw you in, then you might have some of the same problems I had with the story. I felt that the lyrical quality of the prose was consistent from beginning to end. It feels seeped with meaning, somewhat like The Scarlet Letter. Auralia is not a character that you get close to. It's not really her story. It's more the story of those affected by her.
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I can't stop thinking about this series ever since my friend loaned me the first one. Now she has passed it on to another friend and I am reading the 3rd book in the series. I look back and I am beginning to see that the Keeper is God and truth and Auralia is maybe an angel or Jesus to show us Gods true colors. It is very poetic and yet the people live so simply.
PLTK More than 1 year ago
Beautiful book--creative and lyrical.
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Raindream More than 1 year ago
Many will remember that the Bible states “the love of money is a root of all sorts of evil,” but the sacred text goes further than that. “Some by longing for [money] have wandered away from the faith and pierced themselves with many griefs” (1 Timothy 6:10). Change that warning to the love of colorful things, and you have a fair summary of Jeffrey Overstreet’s debut fantasy, Auralia’s Colors. The people of Abascar live in browns and grays. Many years ago they gave up every bit of color they had to please the Queen, whose idea was to collect and mature the beauty of the kingdom before returning it to the people, royally blessed by her. In this way, the whole kingdom would be glorified over the other kingdoms of the Expanse. But the Queen never returned the promised honor to her people, so anyone making or finding something beautiful is required to give it to the king for storing in the vast royal vault. Enter an orphan with enchanting spirit and eyes for nature’s color. She sees what no one cares to see or is afraid to see due to the proclamation of colors. She weaves illegal clothing for the Gatherers who live outside the walls working off criminal sentences. If there were faeries in this world, Auralia would resemble one. She was discovered by the river in a gigantic footprint. She can infuse new color into things she holds. She rides a wildcat and observes beastmen from yards away. All she cares to do is paint her world with new life, and that could make her a criminal. Some modern fantasies echo Tolkien’s work with names, places, or characters that feel lifted directly from The Lord of the Rings. Auralia’s Colors echoes Tolkien in only one significant way, in the use of magic. This world is infused with natural magic. Royal soldiers ride two-legged lizards called vawns instead of horses. Black birds rise from the forest like a sheet every evening to pull up the night. Auralia can draw color out of anything she finds, making paint or dye or thread with it for her artwork. She does this by instinct and experimentation, not knowing how the colors multiply when she weaves them together. In a sense, she is innocent of the nature and power colors have in her world. Similarly, she is innocent of how the adults around her think. Her perspective clashes with the king’s once they finally meet each other. She is a servant of nature; he is servant to none. She would rejoice in the wonders of creation; he would control and store them. While inside a castle room, she says, “Such a small space makes people seem enormous. In the woods, everybody’s properly small.” That humility may be the essence of this recommended novel.
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e_bibliophile More than 1 year ago
I stumbled upon this in a random quest for a story to capture the imagination. I'm so glad I found it and I can't wait to read more of the story in the books the follow. It is not a traditional way of story telling, but it is rich and enthralling none the less.
Meliai More than 1 year ago
I was completely pulled in by this book. I enjoyed it, and I'm definitely buying the next one.
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