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The Autobiography of Andrew Carnegie and The Gospel of Wealth
     

The Autobiography of Andrew Carnegie and The Gospel of Wealth

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by Andrew Carnegie, Gordon Hutner
 

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The enlightening memoir of the industrialist as famous for his philanthropy as for his fortune.

His good friend Mark Twain dubbed him “St. Andrew.” British Prime Minister William Gladstone called him an “example” for the wealthy. Such terms seldom apply to multimillionaires. But Andrew Carnegie was no run-of-the-mill steel

Overview

The enlightening memoir of the industrialist as famous for his philanthropy as for his fortune.

His good friend Mark Twain dubbed him “St. Andrew.” British Prime Minister William Gladstone called him an “example” for the wealthy. Such terms seldom apply to multimillionaires. But Andrew Carnegie was no run-of-the-mill steel magnate. At age 13 and full of dreams, he sailed from his native Dunfermline, Scotland, to America. The story of his success begins with a $1.20-a-week job at a bobbin factory. By the end of his life, he had amassed an unprecedented fortune—and given away more than 90 percent of it for the good of mankind.
 
Here, for the first time in one volume, are two impressive works by Andrew Carnegie himself: his autobiography and “The Gospel of Wealth,” a groundbreaking manifesto on the duty of the wealthy to give back to society all of their fortunes. And he practiced what he preached, erecting 1,600 libraries across the country, founding Carnegie Mellon University, building Carnegie Hall, and performing countless other acts of philanthropy because, as Carnegie wrote, “The man who dies thus rich dies disgraced.”
 
With an Introduction by Gordon Hutner

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781101098370
Publisher:
Penguin Publishing Group
Publication date:
11/07/2006
Sold by:
Penguin Group
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
352
Sales rank:
369,098
File size:
459 KB
Age Range:
18 Years

Meet the Author



Andrew Carnegie was born on November 25, 1835, in Dunfermline, Fife, Scotland, son of a hand loom weaver. In 1848, the family emigrated to the U.S. and settled in Pennsylvania. Carnegie found work in various industries such as telegraphy and the railroad industry, which later proved to be wise decisions. After Carnegie and partner John Pierpont Morgan invested in the steel mills in the 1880s, he became the second-richest person in the world, behind only John D. Rockefeller. Andrew Carnegie spent his last years as a philanthropist, providing the capital for purposes of public interest and social and educational advancement, establishing more than sixteen hundred libraries in the U.S. alone. Carnegie disseminated his riches to public foundations, hospitals, and schools throughout the world, and he even owned Carnegie Hall in New York City from its construction in 1890 until his widow sold it in 1924. In his lifetime, Carnegie gave away more than $350 million. After his death, his last $30 million was also given away to foundations, charities, and pensioners.

 

Gordon Hutner is a professor of English at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. He is founder and editor of the Oxford University Press journal American Literary History. Among his books are What America Read: Taste, Class, and the Novel, 1920–1960; American Literature, American Culture; The American Literary History Reader; and Selected Speeches and Writings of Theodore Roosevelt.




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