Average Is Over: Powering America Beyond the Age of the Great Stagnation

Average Is Over: Powering America Beyond the Age of the Great Stagnation

by Tyler Cowen
3.5 2

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Overview

Average Is Over: Powering America Beyond the Age of the Great Stagnation by Tyler Cowen

The groundbreaking follow-up to the New York Times bestseller The Great Stagnation
 
The United States continues to mint more millionaires and billionaires than any country ever. Yet, since the great recession, three quarters of the jobs created here pay only marginally more than minimum wage. Why is there growth only at the top and the bottom?
 
Renowned economist and bestselling author Tyler Cowen explains that high earners are taking ever more advantage of machine intelligence and achieving ever-better results. Meanwhile, nearly every business sector relies less and less on manual labor, and that means a steady, secure life somewhere in the middle—average—is over.
 
In Average is Over, Cowen lays out how the new economy works and identifies what workers and entrepreneurs young and old must do to thrive in this radically new economic landscape.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780698138162
Publisher: Penguin Publishing Group
Publication date: 09/12/2013
Sold by: Penguin Group
Format: NOOK Book
Pages: 304
Sales rank: 615,722
File size: 1 MB
Age Range: 18 Years

About the Author

TYLER COWEN is a professor of economics at George Mason University. His blog, Marginal Revolution, is one of the world’s most influential economics blogs. He also writes for the New York Times, Financial Times and The Economist and is the cofounder of Marginal Revolution University. The author of five previous books, Cowen lives in Fairfax, Virginia.

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Average Is Over: Powering America Beyond the Age of the Great Stagnation 3.5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 2 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
A great title and an interesting premise. But this is my second disappointment by this author. 'The world is changing and increasingly the jobs will be in management, sophisticated services, and in tech sectors assisted by machines.' The author loves his ipad and chess, and throws in some topical politics at the beginning and end. But I found a lot of the information baseless and anecdotal and the analysis somewhat lacking in rigor. He may well be right but he fails to make a compelling case, and what he does conclude could have been wrapped up in 50 pages. An average book - worth reading but not overwhelming.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago