Awake in the World, Volume One: A collection of stories, essays and poems about wildlife, adventure and the environment

Awake in the World, Volume One: A collection of stories, essays and poems about wildlife, adventure and the environment

Awake in the World, Volume One: A collection of stories, essays and poems about wildlife, adventure and the environment

Awake in the World, Volume One: A collection of stories, essays and poems about wildlife, adventure and the environment

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Overview

This collection of short stories, poems and essays includes the work of more than forty

writers from seven countries, writing about wildlife, adventure and the environment. 

“Leave room in your dry-bag, boat-box, rucksack, even fishing vest, for this rich collection of voices.” 
— CHRIS DOMBROWSKI, author of Body of Water


With a variety of voices writing poetry, short stories and essays, ranging in themes from fly fishing deep in the Beartooth Mountains, surviving a tsunami in Thailand, experiencing clearcutting in a favorite forest, exploring Hawaiian volcanoes, to wishes for a future generation to experience wilderness, and so much between, this book has been a best seller at numerous indie bookstores as well as a favorite at gift shops in Yellowstone National Park.

Includes work from: Tyler Dunning, author of A Field Guid to Losing Your Friends; Chris La Tray, author of One-Sentence Journal; Barry Babcock, author of Teacher’s in the Forest; Anne Casey, winner of the 2021 iGlobal Women’s Award for literature; Daniel J. Rice, author of The Unpeopled Season; Sean Prentiss, author of Finding Abbey; Lauren Camp, Dorset Prize winning author of Took House; Rebecca Durham, author of Half-Life of Empaty; Derek Sheffield, poetry editor at Terrain.org and author of Not For Luck; Taylor Brorby, author of Boys and Oil; and many more.


Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780996309486
Publisher: Riverfeet Press
Publication date: 03/17/2017
Series: Riverfeet Press Anthology , #1
Pages: 274
Product dimensions: 5.50(w) x 8.50(h) x 0.80(d)

About the Author

Daniel J. Rice was born in Wiesbaden, Germany, in 1979. In 2006 he earned a degree in Watershed Science, in Ely, MN, and began working as a Hydrographer for the U.S. Geological Survey, first in New Jersey, and then Wyoming. In 2011 he resigned from his position and moved alone into a tent deep in the forests of northern Minnesota. He is the founder of five independently owned businesses, including Riverfeet Press. Currently he lives in Livingston, MT, where he spends his time camping and fishing the Beartooth Mountains with his wife and daughter.

Sean Prentiss is Associate Professor of English at Norwich University, USA. He is author of Finding Abbey: The Search for Edward Abbey and His Hidden Desert Grave (2015), which won the National Outdoor Book Award for Biography/History. He is also co-editor of The Far Edges of the Fourth Genre (2014).

Tyler Dunning grew up in southwestern Montana, having developed a feral curiosity and reflective personality at a young age. This mindset has led him around the world, to nearly all of the U.S. national parks, and to the darker recesses of his own creativity. He's dabbled in such occupations as professional wrestling, archaeology, social justice advocacy, and academia. Dunning has written for REI, Reserve America, The Gap, and MGM Studios; and is the admin of the 40k-member Facebook group "Exploring the US National Parks."

La Tray, an enrolled member of the Little Shell Tribe of Chippewa Indians, is a writer and photographer who lives just outside Missoula, Montana. His work has appeared in various magazines, collections and anthologies.

It has been suggested that, because of the nature of his work, Chris La Tray must smell like Yukon gold dust, spruce tips, and cedar waxwings.

Derek Sheffield's collection, Not for Luck, was selected by Mark Doty for the Wheelbarrow Books Poetry Prize. He is also the author of Through the Second Skin (Orchises Press, 2013), runner-up for the Emily Dickinson First Book Award and finalist for the Washington State Book Award, and A Mouthpiece of Thumbs (Blue Begonia Press, 2000). He is a co-editor of Dear America: Letters of Hope, Habitat, Defiance, and Democracy (Trinity University Press, 2020). His awards include a special mention in the 2016 Pushcart Anthology and the James Hearst Poetry Prize judged by Li-Young Lee. Derek lives with his family on the eastern slopes of the Cascades in Washington and is the poetry editor of Terrain.org. You can find out more on his website: www.dereksheffield.com

Taylor Brorby is an essayist and poet. The coeditor of Fracture, his work has appeared in the Huffington PostOrion, and North American Review, where he is a contributing editor. He teaches environmental studies at Wofford College in Spartanburg, South Carolina.

Author of Boys and Oil: Growing up Gay in a Fractured Land, and Crude: Poems.

 

Took House is Lauren Camp's fifth book of poetry. Previous books have been shortlisted for the Arab American Book Award, the Housatonic Book Award, the Sheila Margaret Motton Prize, and the New Mexico-Arizona Book Award. One Hundred Hungers, Camp's third book, won the Dorset Prize from Tupelo Press. Lauren is deeply involved in the poetry community. She teaches young students to understand and embody poems for Poetry Out Loud and offers community workshops and mentoring to elders who want to explore poetry as a means for self-expression. As a visiting writer at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota, and keynote speaker at the New Mexico Alzheimer s Caregiver Conference, she has brought an empathic, artistic perspective to doctors, patients and loved ones by sharing her poems on dementia and its effect on families. Her poems have appeared in The Los Angeles ReviewPleiadesPoet LoreSliceDIAGRAM and elsewhere, and been translated into Arabic, Mandarin, Spanish and Turkish. She is an emeritus Black Earth Institute fellow and the recipient of numerous residencies. For 15 years, she hosted a very popular public radio program, blending contemporary poetry with jazz and global music. Each week, her goal was to bring unexpected beauty to the airwaves. In her previous incarnation as a visual artist, Lauren made fiber portraits of her favorite musicians, and assembled a solo exhibit called The Fabric of Jazz, which traveled to museums in ten U.S. cities. She lives in a cozy household in New Mexico with her husband of 25 years and their elderly cat, Ella.

After teaching secondary science for 20 years, Timothy Goodwin is now an associate professor in the Department of Professional Education at Bemidji State University. With a M.A. and Doctorate in Education from Hamline University, and a Bachelor's degree in Biology from St. Olaf College, Dr. Goodwin's research involves work in environmental education, ecological literacy and ecological identity. Goodwin has also written Ecological Identity: Finding Your Place in a Biological World, and Consider, Construct, Confirm: A New Framework for Teaching and Learning. In addition to teaching, writing and illustrating about the natural world, he is also a musician.

Find Dr. Goodwin's blog, music and other information at

www.timothygoodwin.net.

Babcock's lifestyle is one of simple existence. He gathers what he needs from the land by gardening, hunting, harvesting, and his only electricity is harnessed from the sun, and his water from a hand-pumped well. He lives an intimate balance with the natural world. He truly exists on the perimeter of society. Since the de-listing of wolves from the Endangered Species Act, Babcock has been proactively fighting to protect this animal.

Author of Teachers in the Forest.



Sean Prentiss is Associate Professor of English at Norwich University, USA. He is author of Finding Abbey: The Search for Edward Abbey and His Hidden Desert Grave (2015), which won the National Outdoor Book Award for Biography/History. He is also co-editor of The Far Edges of the Fourth Genre (2014).

Tyler Dunning grew up in southwestern Montana, having developed a feral curiosity and reflective personality at a young age. This mindset has led him around the world, to nearly all of the U.S. national parks, and to the darker recesses of his own creativity. He’s dabbled in such occupations as professional wrestling, archaeology, social justice advocacy, and academia. Dunning has written for REI, Reserve America, The Gap, and MGM Studios; and is the admin of the 40k-member Facebook group “Exploring the US National Parks.”

La Tray, an enrolled member of the Little Shell Tribe of Chippewa Indians, is a writer and photographer who lives just outside Missoula, Montana. His work has appeared in various magazines, collections and anthologies.

 

It has been suggested that, because of the nature of his work, Chris La Tray must smell like Yukon gold dust, spruce tips, and cedar waxwings.



Derek Sheffield's collection, Not for Luck, was selected by Mark Doty for the Wheelbarrow Books Poetry Prize. He is also the author of Through the Second Skin (Orchises Press, 2013), runner-up for the Emily Dickinson First Book Award and finalist for the Washington State Book Award, and A Mouthpiece of Thumbs (Blue Begonia Press, 2000). He is a co-editor of Dear America: Letters of Hope, Habitat, Defiance, and Democracy (Trinity University Press, 2020). His awards include a special mention in the 2016 Pushcart Anthology and the James Hearst Poetry Prize judged by Li-Young Lee. Derek lives with his family on the eastern slopes of the Cascades in Washington and is the poetry editor of Terrain.org. You can find out more on his website: www.dereksheffield.com

Taylor Brorby is an essayist and poet. The coeditor of Fracture, his work has appeared in the Huffington PostOrion, and North American Review, where he is a contributing editor. He teaches environmental studies at Wofford College in Spartanburg, South Carolina.

Author of Boys and Oil: Growing up Gay in a Fractured Land, and Crude: Poems.



Took House is Lauren Camp’s fifth book of poetry. Previous books have been shortlisted for the Arab American Book Award, the Housatonic Book Award, the Sheila Margaret Motton Prize, and the New Mexico-Arizona Book Award. One Hundred Hungers, Camp’s third book, won the Dorset Prize from Tupelo Press. Lauren is deeply involved in the poetry community. She teaches young students to understand and embody poems for Poetry Out Loud and offers community workshops and mentoring to elders who want to explore poetry as a means for self-expression. As a visiting writer at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota, and keynote speaker at the New Mexico Alzheimer s Caregiver Conference, she has brought an empathic, artistic perspective to doctors, patients and loved ones by sharing her poems on dementia and its effect on families. Her poems have appeared in The Los Angeles ReviewPleiadesPoet LoreSliceDIAGRAM and elsewhere, and been translated into Arabic, Mandarin, Spanish and Turkish. She is an emeritus Black Earth Institute fellow and the recipient of numerous residencies. For 15 years, she hosted a very popular public radio program, blending contemporary poetry with jazz and global music. Each week, her goal was to bring unexpected beauty to the airwaves. In her previous incarnation as a visual artist, Lauren made fiber portraits of her favorite musicians, and assembled a solo exhibit called The Fabric of Jazz, which traveled to museums in ten U.S. cities. She lives in a cozy household in New Mexico with her husband of 25 years and their elderly cat, Ella.

After teaching secondary science for 20 years, Timothy Goodwin is now an associate professor in the Department of Professional Education at Bemidji State University. With a M.A. and Doctorate in Education from Hamline University, and a Bachelor’s degree in Biology from St. Olaf College, Dr. Goodwin’s research involves work in environmental education, ecological literacy and ecological identity. Goodwin has also written Ecological Identity: Finding Your Place in a Biological World, and Consider, Construct, Confirm: A New Framework for Teaching and Learning. In addition to teaching, writing and illustrating about the natural world, he is also a musician.

Find Dr. Goodwin’s blog, music and other information at

www.timothygoodwin.net.


Babcock’s lifestyle is one of simple existence. He gathers what he needs from the land by gardening, hunting, harvesting, and his only electricity is harnessed from the sun, and his water from a hand-pumped well. He lives an intimate balance with the natural world. He truly exists on the perimeter of society. Since the de-listing of wolves from the Endangered Species Act, Babcock has been proactively fighting to protect this animal.

Author of Teachers in the Forest.

Read an Excerpt

"If you are lucky you will have the opportunity in your life to be owned by a good piece of land." - From the story, A New River, by Daniel J. Rice

Table of Contents

Includes work from: Tyler Dunning, author of A Field Guide to Losing Your

Friends; Chris La Tray, author of One-Sentence Journal; Lauren Camp, Dorset Prize

winning author of Took House; Barry Babcock, author of Teacher’s in the Forest; Daniel J. Rice, author of The Unpeopled Season; Sean Prentiss, author of Finding Abbey; Rebecca Durham, author of Half-Life of Empathy; Derek Sheffield, poetry editor at Terrain.org and author of Not For Luck; Taylor Brorby, author of Crude; and many more.

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