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Baby Talk
     

Baby Talk

5.0 1
by Fred Hiatt, Mark Graham (Illustrator)
 
Joey has a new baby brother and he doesn't understand him one bit.

"WAAH!" the baby wails. Joey's mother says that means he's hungry, but Joey doesn't want to try giving the baby his bottle. "WAAH! WAAH!" the baby cries. Joey's sister says that means he needs a new diaper. Joey lets his sister handle that. "WAAH! WAAH! WAAH!" Joey's father explains the baby's

Overview

Joey has a new baby brother and he doesn't understand him one bit.

"WAAH!" the baby wails. Joey's mother says that means he's hungry, but Joey doesn't want to try giving the baby his bottle. "WAAH! WAAH!" the baby cries. Joey's sister says that means he needs a new diaper. Joey lets his sister handle that. "WAAH! WAAH! WAAH!" Joey's father explains the baby's tired. Joey thinks his father should rock him to sleep.

"Ada agoo." says the baby one day. No one really knows what that means, so Joey decides to talk back. "Agoo ada!" Joey says, much to the baby's delight. After that, they talk all the time.

In a short, simple text and with beautifully expressive, full-color pictures, the growing relationship between Joey and his baby brother unfolds with great warmth and good humor. Perfect for sharing and reading aloud to the very young, Baby Talk speaks the special language of sibling love that will be understood by children and adults alike.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
The team behind If I Were Queen of the World here explores the way a family communicates with their new baby. "WAAH!" says Joey's new brother, and although various family members try to translate ("He's just telling us that he's hungry"; "He's saying he needs a dry diaper"), Joey is not the least bit interested. Then one day the baby says "Agoo." Perceptive Joey learns to repeat the baby's sounds better than anyone else, and he gradually becomes the family's expert in baby talk. "Now what's he saying?" asks Joey's grandmother at the end of the book, and Joey answers, "He's saying he loves his big brother. Right, Baby?" Although not all of the baby's babbling sounds are believable, Hiatt's simple story line and text are age appropriate and full of family warmth. Graham's lustrous oil paintings of the adoring baby and his reluctant hero focus on ordinary family activities--riding in the car, shopping at the supermarket--and give the book a cozy, homespun tone. Children will enjoy spotting the baby's rubber ducky and other toys that litter the family's house, especially when the same toys reappear on the colorful end papers. Ages 3-7. (May) Copyright 1999 Cahners Business Information.
Children's Literature - Children's Literature
Graham's beautiful, softly textured illustrations combined with Hiatt's fast-paced text result in a wonderful read-aloud for young children. Joey is a preschooler who faces a dilemma which is quite common to young children everywhere--apprehension over a new baby brother. Joey wants nothing to do with his new baby brother because all his crying and noise making is so upsetting. When grandmother tells Joey he should be able to understand his baby brother because he, himself, talked baby talk not so long ago, Joey begins to try to communicate. Over time, Joey and his baby brother learn to baby talk and to love each other. A thoughtful read for young siblings trying to adjust to a new baby in the family. 1999, Margaret K. McElderry Books, Ages 4 to 8, $14.00. Reviewer: Betsy Barnett
School Library Journal
PreS-Gr 2-Hiatt depicts the evolving relationship between a young boy and his baby brother. At first, Joey is rather wary and unsure of how to interact with the infant. He demurs at offers from his mom, dad, and older sister for him to feed or hold the baby as they do. Finally, as his brother begins to utter sounds, Joey takes an interest in him and responds to the "baby talk," repeating sounds such as "Ageek" and "Ada agoo." This opens the door to their relationship, as Joey spends more time playing peekaboo and singing and reading to his brother. The gorgeous oil paintings have soft edges and a baby-blue background. This is a lovely book to share with young children unsure of how a new baby will change family dynamics. Both the pictures and the text are positive and reassurng.-Judith Gloyer, Milwaukee Public Library Copyright 1999 Cahners Business Information.
Kirkus Reviews
Importuned by the incomprehensible cries of his baby brother, Joey turns to his other family members to decipher their meaning, preferring the role of an observer in the daily care of his sibling. However, a keen remark from Grandmother enlightens Joey and forges a special bond between the two youngest members of the household: "You spoke baby talk not so long ago." After a few tentative phrases in baby gibberish, the siblings are happily communicating in their own language to their mutual delight. Soon Joey becomes the translator for the family, explaining the baby's requests to the others. The transformation of Joey from reluctant toddler to loving brother is realistically, achingly rendered, saved from sentimentalism by the conversations and genuine affection that blossom between brothers. Graham's incandescent illustrations complement and expand the text, making the flow of emotion between the siblings a nearly tangible element in their scenes. A blend of delicate hues and deep jewel tones suffused by a gentle light lends an ethereal quality to the images. (Picture book. 3-7)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780689821462
Publisher:
Margaret K. McElderry Books
Publication date:
05/01/1999
Edition description:
1 ED
Pages:
32
Product dimensions:
10.32(w) x 9.32(h) x 0.47(d)
Age Range:
3 - 7 Years

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Baby Talk 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Our librarian read this during our 'lunch with the librarian' and my son, and all of the kids, just loved it - especially those with siblings. I'm due to have my second child (another boy - which works well with the story line) any minute, so this was perfect for my 2 1/2 year old - it's beautifully illustrated and kept his - and the rest of the kids - interest!