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Bach and the Baroque: European Source Materials from the Baroque and Early Classical Periods With Special Emphasis on the Music of J.S. Bach

Bach and the Baroque: European Source Materials from the Baroque and Early Classical Periods With Special Emphasis on the Music of J.S. Bach

by Anthony Newman
Bach and the Baroque: European Source Materials from the Baroque and Early Classical Periods With Special Emphasis on the Music of J.S. Bach

Bach and the Baroque: European Source Materials from the Baroque and Early Classical Periods With Special Emphasis on the Music of J.S. Bach

by Anthony Newman

Paperback

$19.99
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Overview

Most articles written about performance practice deal with relatively small areas (trills, over dotting, etc.) placing emphasis on citing original sources or collating several original sources in order to support a given position. There is not sufficient information in these articles to deal with all aspects of Baroque style. This text was built on the premise that as many conclusions as possible should be drawn from the sources themselves. Leaps to conclusions about other aspects of style insufficiently documented in sources are made on the basis of the author's own experience as performer. There are different conclusions that one can reach, as the area is large and some aspects of style find the various sources in disagreement(e.g., time signatures) or are simply not discussed. Most of the source disagreements stem from national differences in style. This text which includes regular assignments may be used as main material for a course on the performance of the music of J.S. Bach or for a course on Baroque performance practice in general. (From the Introduction).



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Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781774191576
Publisher: Maple Leaf Publishing Inc
Publication date: 03/29/2022
Pages: 302
Product dimensions: 7.00(w) x 10.00(h) x 0.63(d)

About the Author

Newman's professional debut, in which he played Bach organ works on the pedal harpsichord, took place at the Carnegie Recital Hall in New York in 1967. Of this performance The New York Times wrote, "His driving rhythms and formidable technical mastery...and intellectually cool understanding of the structures moved his audience to cheers at the endings." Based solely on the Times' review, and without an audition, Columbia Records signed Newman to a recording contract. Clive Davis, head of Columbia Records, took his cue from the prevailing anti-establishment sentiment among young people and Newman's long hair and interest in Zen meditation and marketed Newman as a counterculture champion of Bach would could draw young audiences. As a result, according to Newman, it took some years for him to "live down" the image created by Davis and to be taken seriously in the classical music world. But Newman did indeed draw young audiences as noted by Time magazine in a 1971 article in which they dubbed him the "high priest of the harpsichord." After recording twelve albums for Columbia Records Newman left along with pianist André Watts, another of Davis' protégés, when Davis left Columbia in 1979. Newman has gone on to make solo recordings for a variety of labels including Digitech, Excelsior, Helicon, Infinity Digital/Sony, Moss Music Group/Vox, Newport Classic, Second Hearing, Sheffield, Sine Qua Non, Sony, Deutsch Grammophon, and 903 Records. Newman has recorded most of Bach's keyboard works on organ, harpsichord and piano as well as recording works of Scarlatti, Handel, and Couperin. On the fortepiano he has recorded the works of Beethoven and Mozart. As a conductor Newman has led international orchestras such as the Madeira Festival Orchestra, the Brandenburg Collegium, and the English Chamber Orchestra.For thirty years, starting in 1968, while Newman continued to record, concertize, compose, conduct and write, he taught music at The Juilliard School, Indiana University, and State University of New York at Purchase.Although initially intensely interested in composition, he became discouraged by the non-tonal music that was the focus of conservatory composition departments in the 1950s and '60s. He returned to composition in the 1980s and developed a post-modern compositional style that took over from where pre-atonal post-modernism left off. He makes use of musical archetypes from the 17th, 18th, and 19th centuries as well as 20th century archetypes he has devised himself with the intent making new but accessible music. Newman has written music for a range of instruments including organ, harpsichord, orchestra, guitar, violin, cello, flute chamber ensemble, piano, choral music and opera. In 2011, Newman released a 20-CD set of his most important compositions on 903 Records.Newman is music director of Bach Works and Bedford Chamber Concerts, and is on the board of Musical Quarterly magazine. He is also music director at St. Matthews Church, Bedford New York.

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