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Bad News! I'm in Charge!
     

Bad News! I'm in Charge!

by Bruce Ingman
 
One day, with the help of his superduper metal detector, Danny discovers an ancient treasure chest that gives him power to rule the land. He wastes no time making changes: pets in school, no dentists or hairdressers, and Mom and Dad in bed by eight o�clock. He even finds a way to delegate his most boring new responsibilities, like opening a toothbrush factory or

Overview

One day, with the help of his superduper metal detector, Danny discovers an ancient treasure chest that gives him power to rule the land. He wastes no time making changes: pets in school, no dentists or hairdressers, and Mom and Dad in bed by eight o�clock. He even finds a way to delegate his most boring new responsibilities, like opening a toothbrush factory or kissing babies! With bold, inventive artwork and sly humor, Bruce Ingman captures the essence of every kid�s wildest dream come true.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publishers Weekly
Ingman (When Martha's Away) once again wields delectably artless acrylics and a wicked sense of humor. Using his trusty metal detector, Danny discovers a box containing a "charter" that declares him "the new owner and ruler of this land." He delivers the titular line to his parents and enacts largely predictable changes: "1. Stay up late/ 2. Chips with everything/ 3. Snacks all the time." A spread of students bringing their pets to class (rule #10) demonstrates "School was so much more fun" as children sit at desks with pandas, monkeys and rabbits. Ingman may go over the heads of younger audience members with references to Danny's "special ops squad," and a "central bureau" that informs him of the down side of his new job-judging cabbage competitions and attending operas. Danny subsequently farms out the dirty work to a "cabinet" of adults that includes a "Secretary of Being Polite" and a "Secretary of Boring Things." The type follows along the edges of the spread, encircling the long table around which they convene. Ingman's illustrations will likely charm all ages. His intriguing compositions mix delightfully unfinished elements-line drawings of floating heads, doorways suggested by a mere swath of yellow paint-with complete (often na vely drawn) and vividly painted figures of Danny and his grown-up subjects. Ages 4-7. (Apr.) Copyright 2003 Reed Business Information.
School Library Journal - School Library Journal
K-Gr 2-A boy becomes "owner and ruler of this land" by a decree in a buried charter he finds with his metal detector. In Napoleonic uniform, he appoints a Special Ops Squad of his peers and compiles his list of changes to be made. They include "snacks all the time," "wear what you like," and "make your mom & dad wait outside in the car while you visit the toy store for hours & hours." However, the protagonist finds that being in charge is grueling work, with an agenda packed with kissing babies and judging beauty contests. He creates a Cabinet of adults (diverse ethnic groups but no women) to handle the tedium: Secretary of Shaking Hands, Secretary of Being Polite, etc. The quirky artwork is a fresh blend of various techniques: line drawings in ink, cut paper, and photographic inserts. Paintings give the impression of having been executed by a child just as the story reads like the product of a child's mind. Page layouts energetically defy conventional expectations in a wild salad of contradictory dimensions, aerial views, objects out of scale-the works! While the pages vibrate with wild colors, the text is simple. It roams all over the page, its font is mutating, but the words themselves are easy. Readers are therefore freed up to absorb what's happening in the illustrations. Bad News! is wacky and just right.-Liza Graybill, Worcester Public Library, MA Copyright 2003 Reed Business Information.
Kirkus Reviews
Unearthing a proclamation that makes him the boss of everything, a lad proceeds to make the best of it in this undiluted wish-fulfillment fantasy. Working from a quickly drawn-up list ("1. Stay up late. 2. Chips with everything. 3. Snacks all the time. 4. Every Wednesday, teachers wear funny hats"), he sends his parents to bed at eight, installs a bank of TVs, and the like-then discovers that there's a list of eye-glazing responsibilities too, like kissing babies and opening factories. Only momentarily daunted, however, he assigns all that boring stuff to a cabinet of square-headed adults, and proclaims himself President of Fun. Ingman (Night on the Tiles, 1999, etc.) adds occasional photographic fragments to postmodern scenes featuring sketchy figures and garish finger-paint colors, creating illustrations that are as direct and uncomplicated as the gleeful narrative. Fans of Jules Feiffer's recent excursions into the preteen id will find themselves on familiar ground here. (Picture book. 6-8)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780763620721
Publisher:
Candlewick Press
Publication date:
03/20/2003
Edition description:
1ST US
Pages:
32
Product dimensions:
10.38(w) x 11.50(h) x 0.32(d)
Age Range:
4 - 7 Years

Meet the Author

Bruce Ingman has taught in several colleges of art and illustrated for such
magazines as BRITISH VOGUE. He has also written and illustrated three children’s books, one of which won a Mother Goose Award and a National Art Library Illustration Award. A recipient of a master’s degree from the Royal College of Art, Bruce Ingman grew up in Liverpool and now lives in London, England. This is his first book with Candlewick Press.

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