Banewreaker: Volume I of The Sundering

Banewreaker: Volume I of The Sundering

by Jacqueline Carey
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Overview

Banewreaker: Volume I of The Sundering by Jacqueline Carey

Following the triumphant success of her Kushiel series (Kushiel's Dart, Kushiel's Chosen, Kushiel's Avatar), Jacqueline Carey now turns her hand to another startling fable, an epic tale of gods waging war in their bid to control an entire universe and the mortals they use as chess pieces in a most deadly game.

Once, the Seven Shapers dwelled in accord. First-born among them was Haomane, Lord-of-Thought and with his brother and sister gods, the Seven drew upon of the power of the Souma, claimed a race of beings for their own and began Shaping the world to their will.

But Haomane saw the ways of this new world and was displeased. For in his younger brother Satoris, once called the Sower, Haomane thought too prideful and in his gift, the quickening of the flesh too freely to the races...and to that of Man in particular. Haomane asked Satoris to withdraw his Gift from Men but he refused. And so began the Shapers' War.

Eons have passed. The war that ensued Sundered the very world. Haomane and his siblings lay to one end of a vast ocean unable to touch their creations, Satoris and the races of the world on the other. Satoris has been broken and left adrift among the peoples of the world and is reviled, with most of the races believing that it was he alone who caused the rift and depriving them of the balm of the Seven. He sits in Darkhaven, controlling his own dominion--seeking not victory but neither vengeance.

But still Haomane is not content. Through Haomane's whispers in the minds and hearts of the races of the world come a prophecy that if Satoris were defeated, the world could be made whole and all would bask in the light of the Souma again. And the few who stay by Satoris are viewed as the ultimate evil. And so the races come together to defeat Satoris, a being who helped engender them all but who is caught in his elder brother's warp.

Strong storytelling with evocative, compelling, and unforgettable characters, Banewrecker ultimately asks the question:

If all that is considered good considers you evil, are you?



At the Publisher's request, this title is being sold without Digital Rights Management Software (DRM) applied.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781429910941
Publisher: Tom Doherty Associates
Publication date: 08/01/2005
Series: Sundering , #1
Sold by: Macmillan
Format: NOOK Book
Pages: 432
Sales rank: 302,592
File size: 571 KB

About the Author

Jacqueline Carey is the author of the bestselling Kushiel trilogy (Kushiel's Dart, Kushiel's Chosen, and Kushiel's Avatar) and her epic fantasy duology, The Sundering (Banewreaker and Godslayer). She has won the Locus Award for Best First Novel and the Romantic Times Reviewers' Choice Award for Best Fantasy Novel. Her books have been listed on many booksellers' top ten fantasy books lists. Always an avid reader, Carey began writing fiction as a hobby in high school. After graduating from Lake Forest College, she worked for six months at a bookstore in London, and returned to the United States with a driving passion to write professionally. She resides in western Michigan.


Jacqueline Carey is the author of the bestselling Kushiel trilogy (Kushiel’s Dart, Kushiel’s Chosen, and Kushiel’s Avatar) and her epic fantasy duology, The Sundering (Banewreaker and Godslayer). She has won the Locus Award for Best First Novel and the Romantic Times Reviewers' Choice Award for Best Fantasy Novel. Her books have been listed on many booksellers’ top ten fantasy books lists. Always an avid reader, Carey began writing fiction as a hobby in high school. After graduating from Lake Forest College, she worked for six months at a bookstore in London, and returned to the United States with a driving passion to write professionally. She resides in western Michigan.

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Banewreaker (Sundering Series #1) 3.6 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 34 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I have yet to read a novel by Jacqueline Carey that leaves me feeling anything less than impressed. She is definitely one of the premier fantasists of our time. Despite the inane criticism below, Banewreaker is not a cliched Tolkien rip-off (I've read books like that before, and this is certainly not one of them, not by a long shot). Carey's use of language is impeccable, and the worlds she creates in her writing are as deep and rich as the characters she populates them with. If you enjoy fantasy, then you won't want to miss this book.
harstan More than 1 year ago
The Seven Shapers worked in harmonious unity using the power of the Souma to shape the world and its races to their images. After a time the eldest Haomane did not like what he observed; he felt his brother Satoris gave too much to the subservient. He demanded that his sibling extract his Gift to mankind, but an outraged prideful Satoris refuses as he insists he is no underling. The Shapers' War explodes with the world as its victim............................. The battling brothers reside on opposite sides of the Sundering Ocean with the other siblings living with Haomane while Satoris resides in underground Darkhaven. Haomane would confront and kill Satoris, but knows that his foe possesses the deadly Godslayer. Instead he uses innuendos and rumors amongst the people that Satoris, the Father of Lies, caused the sundering destruction and spreads a prophecy of good times once Satoris dies........................... Satoris must prevent the prophecy from happening because the end state is his death. He sends loyal immortal General Tanaros Blacksword to kidnap the also immortal Cerelinde to stop her from marrying a royal mortal, part of the prophecy. At the same time Malthus leads Haomane's forces on an assault of Darkhaven.......................... This opening act of the Sundering tales is an exhilarating epic war of the gods¿ fantasy. The fast-paced story line grips readers because the non-stop action makes believers of readers that the Seven Shapers especially the two antagonists are genuine with powers beyond mortals. Similar to the Tolkien mythos, genre fans will appreciate Jacqueline Carey proof that she has plenty to offer readers beyond Kushiel with this fantastic tale in which good and evil is blurred except for a tremendous public relations campaign....................... Harriet Klausner
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Every tale has 2 sides to the story... Carey does a great job reminding us that nothing in life is every black and white, all the while giving a story that is gripping and thought provoking. Such a wonderful read!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I was almost put off trying this by the reviews talking about how detailed and confusing the opening chapters are. Fortunately, I decided to trust an accomplished author instead. There certainly is a lot to learn about this world and the charaters in it, as well as their motivations, but move into this world with faith in the story teller and you will enjoy every chapter!
RonCN More than 1 year ago
Some books hook you from the very first sentence. Other books fail to capture you at all. And then, there are books like Banewreaker: tales what will coax you subtly, irrevocably, word by word, without you realizing it, until you cannot stop poring over its pages. I started reading this series because I found an interesting comment by George R.R. Martin in his own website: he said that it was a good read, that it told the story of the Lord of the Rings from the point of view of Sauron's minions. Both the source and the recommendation were enough to make me grab my own copy, but it turned out that things were, as they are wont to be, much more complex. A retelling of the Lord or the Rings? No: so much more. Banewreaker's first lines are not very easy to read. The first chapter might be slow, as Carey explains with her flowery, descriptive prose the intricacies of the world's origin, of its deities, its inhabitants, its myth and lore. Perhaps the reader will find trouble remembering the names, or recognizing what the names refer to. But, as pages start to flow with increasing speed, it is obvious that these seeming faults are, in truth, great strengths: The prose has a cadence, a rhythm to it, that will immediately evoke a powerful epic in the reader's mind. Descriptions abound, but are never overused: I could feel every nuance of atmosphere in this book and did not feel the need to skip a paragraph once. Races, places, items are mentioned, and the reader is supplied with enough information to know "what" the author refers to without having their imagination limited in any way when it is unimportant to the plot. This helps to create a feeling of realism and continuity as well. Every character, from the Shapers and the ancient dragons to the lords to the soldiers, is a piece that fits perfectly in the tapestry that is Banewreaker. They all have motivations to be where they are, to do what they do. They know hate and duty and passion. They might seem bitter at times, or haunted by their past, but that is because such is the nature of man: yes, Lord Ushahin has never forgiven those who tried to kill him with stones and sticks when he was but a child because of his mixed heritage. But, can we honestly ask him to forgive and forget? Satoris feels the hatred of his older brother, and becomes more and more bitter, but, can we ask anything else, when he has been turned into the paradigm of evil because he did what he had to to protect life as it was? The villains of this tale are, indeed, the heroes from the other side, and it doesn't take long before we can empathize with their trials and their plight. And these all these heroes and villains clash in a riveting storyline wherein Satoris' attempts to prevent the prophecy of his destruction to come to fruition: the words have always been there, but now that his enemies are on the move, he decides to strike first and capture one of the integral parties: the Lady Celerinde, whose wedding to the descendant of a particular House of men would signal the beginning of the end. But was this move to stop the prophecy, or to follow it through? Satoris is not the evil he's been made to look like, but will Celerinde understand this in time to make a difference? Because all things are as they must be, and the darkness of Darkhaven shines bright even as the alliance of his rival brings the shadows to its doorstep. Banewreaker is a renovation of the fantasy genre, and no one sh
cassandrak19 More than 1 year ago
I found this book rather hard to get into and hard to follow at first. After reading for a while it became much more interesting and easier to read.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I fell in love with Carey's Kushiel series, and have carefully collected each book she has written. Having said that, do NOT buy this book based on the premise that it will be something like the Kushiel novels. My opinion is, if you loved the Kushiel Series, stick with those.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Read this book and then I highly recommend you also read the next book in this series called 'Godslayer'.
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