Barbed-Wire Butterflies

Barbed-Wire Butterflies

by Jessica Kristie

Hardcover

$16.95
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Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780988184572
Publisher: Winter Goose Publishing
Publication date: 01/23/2013
Pages: 208
Product dimensions: 6.00(w) x 9.00(h) x 0.63(d)

About the Author

Jessica Kristie is an award winning author, a writer, and a lover of poetry. She is an advocate for art, an activist against human trafficking, and a soulful contributor to the strengthening of our creative communities.

What People are Saying About This

Kathryn Mattingly

Barbed-Wire Butterflies is a powerful book about a sobering subject. Jessica Kristie helps you wrap your head around the horrors of human trafficking while drawing you into her characters and causing you to feel their pain, confusion and hopelessness. The humanity in all of us should be outraged by this subject. Just as Elani fights back and will not accept her fate within the confines of her barbed wire world, we should not give up on the war against trafficking. Each of us should feel personally responsible to help end this worldwide atrocity. (Kathryn Mattingly, President of Editorial Management for The Possibility Place)

Genny Heikka

Jessica Kristie has done an excellent job of balancing the horror of trafficking with the hope of survival and restoration. (Genny Heikka, Author and Courage Worldwide Director of Communications)

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Barbed Wire Butterflies 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Anne_Baxter_Campbell More than 1 year ago
This story was compelling to me, maybe because the sickening problem of slavery has never ended. Even though we have laws against it, human trafficking still continues. Another reason is maybe because Jessica Kristie will be one of our presenters (and the one who will listen to pitches) at the Write to Inspire Conference in Sacramento on July 19 and 20. Thirteen-year-old Elani Benjamin has been kidnapped by people looking for cheap labor. Hundreds of girls work in an ugly, concrete-walled building. They make clothing, electronic equipment, clean the place, and sleep in cells after their long days of work and little food. The guards could take their pick of the girls whenever they wanted. In other words, a living hell on earth. Elani has no choice but to follow their orders, but exhaustion does not stop her from making friends with her three cell mates and one friendly janitor. They warn her not to make waves and above all not to make eye contact with the guards or the Captain. Especially not the Captain. Horror stories circulate in whispers as the girls work and in their cells. Minor illnesses can become fatal. Small injuries must be avoided at all costs. Hurry to each assignment or else. Hope is in short supply, but Elani must cling to the hope that one day she will be free, or she will lose her individuality and her soul the way so many around her have already done.