Bare Bones: The Unabridged Life of Yeshua son of Joseph from Galilee

Bare Bones: The Unabridged Life of Yeshua son of Joseph from Galilee

by Kaarin Alisa

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Bare Bones: The Unabridged Life of Yeshua son of Joseph from Galilee by Kaarin Alisa

Known to many as Jesus, Bare Bones is a first-person account of the first forty years of Yeshua's life that reads like a riveting adventure novel. This is Yeshua's story-full of deep humanity and passion-as revealed to Kaarin Alisa through her lifelong conversations with him.


Yeshua lived in turbulent times, and enemies stalked him from the day he was born. This is Yeshua's life as he recalls it, without the shroud of religious constructs, popular myth, or dogma overshadowing his story. Relinquish what you think you know about this man in favor of a richer, more compelling truth-of who he is, how he lived, why he did what he did, and what he is doing today. Learn how Yeshua suggests people can propel their lives toward healing, love, and cohesiveness. He doesn't offer himself as a savior; rather he assures us we are divine beings too, and he promises to reveal to you how it feels to be loved beyond measure.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781504331319
Publisher: Balboa Press
Publication date: 11/24/2015
Pages: 608
Product dimensions: 6.00(w) x 9.00(h) x 1.23(d)

Read an Excerpt

Bare Bones

The Unabridged Life of Yeshua Son of Joseph from Galilee


By Kaarin Alisa

Balboa Press

Copyright © 2015 Kaarin Alisa
All rights reserved.
ISBN: 978-1-5043-3131-9



CHAPTER 1

My Rocking Chair


If I want for solace, I come here, to my rocking chair. Its simple construct, with gentle curves and well-worn armrests, envelopes me. This embrace mimics his embrace and he, of course, is my father, my Joseph. In the gentle support of the wood, I find strength, courage, and healing; all of which I need in regular and abundant doses.

I wish I could bring you here to my home where wounds are immediately salved, grief is replaced with joy, and love rules without contest. Many conspired to bring me here and it started a long time before I was born. Walking the path that enabled my life required courage and sacrifice from countless people. To each soul, I am grateful.

But none more so than Joseph. He has been marginalized in the annals of time; his perceived role reduced to that of a foster father who provided food and shelter, a mere smidgen of his true contribution. I had only fourteen short years to learn from him, to soak in his wisdom and his love. But that wisdom, that love, molded me more than all that came after. He was a leader, and as such a true follower. He led our people, our family, and he followed the call of our needs with his heart and soul born of reason and compassion. Many teachers followed in my life, and many experiences would discipline me, but of them all, Joseph was the finest. His lessons were basic and to this day, I call on them often: love without compromise, protect what is sacred, accept responsibility for your actions, contribute to life with goodness, and embrace that which is divine, in nature, in others, and in yourself.

Joseph's gentle manner was commanding and when he spoke, people listened. He chose his words carefully, as if like Torah, each precisely chosen word conveyed intrinsic value. But more than that, the cadence of his speech would touch your ear in a way that made you want to listen more carefully as well.

As each day begins anew, I start my communion with my Creator in the same way I have since this life began. I ask to be humble enough to see my mistakes and courageous enough to correct them. This I learned from Joseph, too.

"We derive our strength from divine love. Our community breaks only if we disregard one member for the fear of our own skin. The Way of Peace teaches that we stand together or we don't stand at all."

- Mary mother of Yeshua –

Then, of course, there was my mother, Mary, who shouldn't be forgotten, not that anyone could. She was unforgettable. Mary wore her soul like most women wear clothes. She oozed love; not sappy love, but unconditional love channeled straight from her Creator. She was tough when she needed to be, strong when circumstances required it, and focused like a laser when her mind was set.

She was a woman of few words, knowing her actions spoke more eloquently than her voice ever could. She was educated, poised, and resolute. As her son, her first-born, I never saw her faith falter. Not even during and immediately following the time of my physical persecution was she anything other than a pillar of strength and divine acceptance.

She was however, deeply affected by the occurrences of her life. Never did a tear flow that it didn't prompt her compassion. Never did a wound bleed that she didn't reach to soothe it. And never did a loved one die that her heart didn't burn into ash and have to find some way to rise again like a phoenix to continue to the next day.

These two remarkable people were my parents.

And there were others, family and community members that I remember with great love: uncles, aunts, cousins, community elders, farmhands, workers, and friends of all sorts. It was a rich community of people around me, but who was I to them? I don't know. I could recount what they said, or how they acted in my presence, but to the person, I don't recall anyone sitting me down and telling me what they thought of me.

I was obviously different from other children. I was taller in stature than other boys, and I was highly precocious.

When I turned two years old, my parent's made a change in the sleeping arrangements of our home. Where there had been two beds and a cradle in my parent's room, now there was only one bed, and instead of sleeping in the cradle, I moved to another room.

The family grew rapidly after that. Before I could turn three, my brother James was born, and by five, my sister Ruth joined us. Jude came to the family the year after that and Sarah was born two years later.

Little Shelah, small and fragile, was born two years after Sarah. Unfortunately, her health never held strong and she died well before her majority, after I left home for my studies in the east.

Having all these siblings made for a lively household. The sound of children seemed ever-present in my young life. There was always someone with whom to share an adventure, or to tease, or to discover a truth about life. Sometimes those truths came with laughter, sometimes with tears, but always with love.

When I was three, my only living Grandparent, Anne, died, but I fondly remember her face. Wrinkled and filled with solemnity most of the time, my heart would burst with joy when, upon seeing me, her eyes lit up and her mouth unfolded into a wide smile. She loved me and I her.

James, being closest to my age, and being a boy, was my fondest companion. I never made a better friend than James. He was intelligent, but due to being two years younger, he could never catch up to me. It started a competition that lasted until I left home. He was ever vigilant to do me one better if he could. Truthfully, there were plenty of things James did better than I and if he'd spent more time uplifting his own talents, than trying to outdo mine, he would've had a smoother childhood. That said, I can't fault him in anything.

He was also taller than most children were. Years later, when I came home from my wanderings, James stood nearly as tall as I and looked very similar in appearance. Some might've said we were twins the resemblance was so strong. As a child, the resemblance seemed normal to me; however, as an adult, I found it unusual. I knew by then that I wasn't a product of my mother and father's genetics, but James supposedly was, and I could never figure out how he came out looking so much like me instead of more like our other brother, or Joseph's sons from his first family.

Unable to hold myself back from the things I loved, I devoured the wise books of my ancestors. I needed knowledge. My mind took it in like dry sand takes in water. My curiosity about the world was so strong that even the men who worked the fields grew weary of my questions. I wanted to know how everything worked. The why of it all was my ever-present quest.

But as quick and agile as my mind was, my hands were less agile. I could do pretty much anything I set my mind to, but when it came to the mundane tasks of building, or farming, the results of my efforts were often mediocre. I could build a beautiful chair, but it might wobble. I could prune a tree, but it might take twice as long as someone else. I could sweep the floor, but more than once, poor Josea, our cook, housekeeper, and wife of Herodes our trusted foreman, would regret asking for my help, because she would have to sweep it again nearly right away.

My brain may have functioned in some way that in your modern time would be seen as a diagnosable disorder, I can't say, but the fact remained that when it came to learning and using my mind, I excelled; and when it came to doing the mundane, I did not. I know I was creative, there's no argument there, but my real creativity didn't distinguish itself until I was much older.

All in all, my unquenchable thirst for knowledge was exactly to plan.

"It was difficult being Yeshua's brother. I always felt as though whatever we did, he did it better. I could never measure up. It wasn't until after he left on his travels that I accepted that who I was, was special enough. It took his absence for me to see me."

- James brother of Yeshua –

CHAPTER 2

Present Danger


For the most part, life was pleasant around our community. But even as early as three or four, I understood there were dangers that could confront us at any moment.

The main part of our property was surrounded by a stone wall. There were two gates in the wall where traffic could pass. The northwestern gate was generally used only when heavy goods were being transported by cart. We kept it fortified the rest of the time. The southern gate was the main entrance, with a road through it that wound up the hill to the porch of our house. Construction was being done close to that road on new homes and other buildings needed to run the farm efficiently. Normally, the gate was open and people passed through as needed without question.

But from time to time, Joseph would post men there and at watch stations scattered around the property. When this happened, fear was palpable and the children were admonished to stay near or inside the buildings. I was too young to understand the full ramifications of it all.

When I was barely five, I had the misfortune of witnessing the horrifying effects of this danger for the first time. James was a toddler and Mary was pregnant with Ruth.

It began at morning meal. A rider came, excited and out of breath. Joseph listened to what the rider had to say and immediately called the community together. All work stopped and I was sheltered inside the gathering room of our home with Mary and several other women and children. I could see men dispatched to fortify the gate, while others rode away on horseback.

After a time, many of our friends who lived outside the walls were escorted up the hill and sequestered into the buildings. As soon as this was accomplished, a hush fell over the community. The faces of the adults were consumed with worry and fear. When I questioned Mary, she held me tight and told me not to worry, that we were people of peace and that God would watch after us.

Over the next few hours, several of the people around me would periodically lower their heads in prayer. But no one spoke; the quiet remained intact. Even the children, including me, who would normally squirm with the desire to run and play, were cowering under the cloaking arms of the adults. I was afraid, but I didn't know of what!

Then there was a commotion outside. Through the big windows of this community room, I could see down the hill as a large party of men on horses came to the gate. They were dressed strangely, in short costumes that glinted in the sun, unlike anything I had ever seen. Our neighbors at the gate tried to prevent entrance to these strangers, but I could see them point sharp-bladed poles at our friends and after a few minutes, the gate was opened wide. Soon, I came to understand these poles for what they were; spears, terrible instruments of destruction.

The men on horses came up the hill. Joseph and Herodes went outside to meet them. Mary was shaking as she held James and me tightly to her side. I looked up and saw silent tears dripping down her cheeks.

Two of the men on horses dismounted and spoke with Joseph. Their voices got loud and their manner animated. As they talked, several of the other men dismounted and brandished their spears at Joseph and Herodes. Mary gasped and I could hear Joseph say in a clear lifted voice, "Please, we are people of peace. I will work with you. We will comply with the law."

The man who was obviously in charge waved at the other men to pull back their spears. I couldn't hear the next part of the exchange, but the men were gesturing toward the houses and menacing Joseph. Joseph nodded at Herodes and I saw him walk to his house with two of the strangers and ask one of our friends to come out. I knew the man. His name was Jacob and I liked him very much. He came up the hill often to help Herodes work the fields. I knew he had a wife and children. As he came forward, one of the strangers grabbed Jacob by the arm and flung him to the dirt.

Joseph stepped forward and I heard him say loudly, "Please, calm yourselves. I'm sure we can clear this up without violence." The man in charge raised his hand to Joseph and I thought he was going to strike him, but he stopped when Joseph stood there unguarded and without flinching.


(Continues...)

Excerpted from Bare Bones by Kaarin Alisa. Copyright © 2015 Kaarin Alisa. Excerpted by permission of Balboa Press.
All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher.
Excerpts are provided by Dial-A-Book Inc. solely for the personal use of visitors to this web site.

Table of Contents

Contents

Preface by Kaarin, xvii,
Preface by Yeshua, xix,
Childhood,
1 · My Rocking Chair, 3,
2 · Present Danger, 6,
3 · Bit of Love, 9,
4 · There Were Others, 13,
5 · Power of a Frog, 17,
6 · Your Time to Cry, James, 20,
7 · Who's Crying Now?, 24,
8 · Mediterranean, 26,
9 · The Nile, 30,
10 · Memphis, 33,
11 · Can You Talk?, 37,
12 · My Will Be Done, 39,
13 · Libraries of Knowledge, 43,
Eastern Education,
14 · Gnosis Trumped Everything, 49,
15 · Five Promises, 51,
16 · The Ship to Krokola, 55,
17 · Subterfuge, 58,
18 · The Southern Route, 61,
19 · Slow Down Time, 63,
20 · Consequences, 66,
21 · Kapilavastu, 70,
22 · Madib Returns, 73,
23 · Death, 78,
24 · Insa'alet, 80,
25 · Restricted Library, 83,
26 · The Natural World, 87,
27 · Tutoring Seleya, 91,
28 · Vengeance Strikes, 95,
29 · Rehashed and Punished, 99,
30 · The Valley of My Heart, 102,
31 · A Proposition, 104,
32 · Map from Antiquity, 109,
33 · Following the Signs, 112,
34 · Entering the Yawn, 115,
Light of the Universe,
35 · The Temple of Man, 121,
36 · The Event, 124,
37 · Source, 127,
38 · Confusion, 131,
39 · Bitter Cold, 135,
40 · Resistance, 140,
41 · The Adept Way, 143,
Darkness of the World,
42 · Many Squalor Moons, 149,
43 · Intemperate Illusion, 152,
44 · A New Brotherhood, 155,
45 · A Bad Night, 158,
46 · The Sun Rose Again, 161,
47 · Providence Takes a Hand, 165,
48 · Five Promises Revisited, 168,
49 · Forgiveness Prevails, 170,
50 · Smothered in Love, 173,
Returning Home,
51 · Ignoble Journey, 177,
52 · Myopia, 181,
53 · Through the Gate, 184,
54 · Confession, 187,
55 · Not Who I Should Be, 191,
56 · Cover of Darkness, 194,
57 · A New Seed, 199,
58 · Her Kindness, 202,
59 · The Broken Sword, 205,
60 · Dealing with the Dead, 210,
61 · The Gift, 214,
62 · Jerusalem, 219,
63 · Joseph's Visit, 222,
64 · Going home, 224,
65 · A Cluster of Fools, 228,
Preparing the Path,
66 · Accepting the Mantle, 233,
67 · Rosemary and Cinder, 238,
68 · Dispelling Shadows, 241,
69 · Facing the White Tiger, 243,
70 · Rumors, Rumors, 248,
71 · Mary's Heart, 252,
72 · Proceeding, 254,
73 · Moments of Truth, 257,
74 · To Be or Not to Be – Married, 260,
75 · How Quickly a Day Can Change, 263,
76 · Counting the Dead, 266,
77 · A Telling Visit, 269,
78 · Like Glue, 271,
79 · Betrothal, 274,
80 · A Dark Omen, 278,
81 · My Wedding Day, 281,
Son of Man Ignited,
82 · Gift of Light, 285,
83 · Logistics, 290,
84 · Gathering Talk: The Living Law, 293,
85 · Devotees, 295,
86 · Gathering Talk: Spiritual Slavery300,
87 · Saving Simon, 303,
88 · Surrender, 308,
89 · New Places, New Faces, 313,
90 · Gathering Talk: Most Precious Currency, 316,
91 · Nadia Returns, 319,
92 · Discontent, 322,
93 · No More Walking, 327,
94 · Infinite Possibilities, 330,
95 · Gathering Talk: Exaltation, 335,
96 · Back to Galilee, 338,
97 · Treachery Revealed, 341,
98 · Breaking with Tradition344,
99 · Rebel Purging, 349,
100 · Grief and Honor, 355,
101 · Micah, 360,
The Quickening,
102 · Unclean Acts, 365,
103 · Disturbing News, 369,
104 · Harmful Actions, 372,
105 · Maelstrom, 376,
106 · Dangerous Man, 379,
107 · How Could You?, 384,
108 · The Cost of Power, 388,
109 · Home Again, 391,
110 · Harbinger, 394,
111 · Secrets Revealed, 398,
112 · Consequences and Choices, 401,
113 · Joseph's Memories, 404,
114 · Angels, 408,
115 · Made for This, 413,
116 · Just Getting Started, 417,
117 · A Sacred Act, 422,
118 · Energetic Matrices, 426,
119 · Volunteers, 429,
Conception,
120 · Pagan Rattles, 435,
121 · Will the Killing Stop?, 439,
122 · Dark Energies, 442,
123 · Cold Comfort, 446,
124 · Odious Offering, 449,
125 · Conceiving the Event, 453,
126 · A Matter of Faith, 456,
127 · Loud Voice of Wisdom, 459,
128 · Affairs in Order, 464,
Meeting the Edge,
129 · Eleven Days of Ardor, 469,
130 · Only One I Trust, 470,
131 · King for a Day, 474,
132 · Destined to Rise Again, 477,
133 · Mark These Words, 481,
134 · The Last Supper, 486,
135 · Treacherous Priest, 489,
136 · Send Him Home, 494,
137 · Give Me More, 498,
138 · Hang Him, 502,
139 · Now We Shall See, 505,
140 · An Ancient Dance, 510,
141 · It is Time, 515,
142 · Entombed, 517,
143 · Before You Were Born, 522,
144 · Incubation, 525,
145 · Birth, 529,
146 · I'm Alive, 531,
147 · Recognized, 535,
Just the Beginning,
148 · Aftermath, 541,
149 · I am Waiting, 543,
Resource Material,
Yeshua's Family Tree, 547,
Who's Who, 549,
Timeline, 562,
Index, 565,
Index of Quotes, 579,
About the Author, 583,

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