Baroness

Baroness

by Susan May Warren

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Overview

She no longer recognized herself in the mirror.



Book Two in the Daughters of Fortune series by acclaimed, RITA award-winning, USA Today best-selling author Susan May Warren



Coming of age in the turbulent Roaring Twenties, two daughters of fortune can have everything they possibly want--except freedom.



Expected to marry well and take the reins of the family empire, Lilly and Rosie have their entire lives planned out for them. But Lilly longs to flee the confines of New York City for the untamed wilds of Montana. Her cousin Rosie dreams of the bright lights of the newly emerging silver screen. Following their dreams--to avant-garde France, to dazzling Broadway, to the skies of the fearless wing walkers--will demand all their courage.



When forced to decide, will Lilly and Rosie truly be able to abandon lives of ease and luxury for the love and adventure that beckons? At what cost will each daughter of fortune find her true love and happy ending?

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781609366315
Publisher: Ideals Publications
Publication date: 03/06/2012
Pages: 320
Product dimensions: 5.50(w) x 8.40(h) x 1.10(d)

About the Author

SUSAN MAY WARREN is the best-selling author of more than thirty novels whose compelling plots and unforgettable characters have earned her acclaim from readers and reviewers alike. She is a winner of the ACFW Carol Award, the RITA Award, and the Inspirational Readers Choice Award and a nominee for the Christy Award. She is the founder of My Book Therapy, a community that helps other writers find their voices. Susan and her husband have four children and live in a small Minnesota town on the shore of beautiful Lake Superior. Read more at susanmaywarren.com.

Customer Reviews

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Baroness 4.7 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 12 reviews.
ruthhill74 More than 1 year ago
I will admit that when I began this book, I did not really think I would like it. It was historical fiction, but the 1920's did not really interest me. At least, the characters in this book did not interest me. Why would I want to read about flappers in Paris who seemed to care so little for God that they got themselves into all sorts of trouble? I was wrong. About one third of the way into the book, I had a change of heart. I was interested in Rosie and Lilly, and it was neat to see the stories go back and forth between these two young women. They both did things that amazed me, and they had big-time hardships. And it was clear that this was a time period about which I needed to learn a lot more. Susan May Warren has written a different type of Christian fiction than I have ever read before. I would call her writing style very realistic and full of raw emotion at times. I was pleased to not have the "happily ever after" ending that so many Christian romances seem to suggest in their stories. Bad things did happen. And not all the main characters even came to trust in God. The position of God was truly unique in the concept of this book. Even in stories where the Christian message is woven into the fabric of the story, God plays a significant, front-and-center role. God essentially takes a "back seat" in this story, but His influence permeates the stories of Lilly and Rosie. I was quite pleased when I realized how much research the author must have conducted to write about airplanes and newspapers in such great detail. She truly has a grasp of the time period, and her characters are three-dimensional. In fact, I would say they sometimes jump off the page! My only concern is that Susan May Warren will not write a sequel. I feel like I must know what happens to the characters. The story ended with my wanting more--much more. I have grown to love the characters, and I will await anything further from the author! I was sent a copy of this book in exchange for my honest review. I was not financially compensated in any way, and all opinions are 100 percent mine.
Icecream18JA More than 1 year ago
Although this is a book in a series, the reader can mostly get by without having read the first. The two daughters are both different and similar, they both want to make their way in life, but have very different ideas of how they should go about doing so. Rosie and Lilly will tell their tales from their own view points. The reader will likely be able to connect to at least one, if not both, of the main characters. They go through experiences that many of us will have at least once in our lives. We can flinch in embarrassment and be glad for them. The author clearly spent a lot of time on the setting. The details were refined and the reader will really feel as if he/she stepped into the Roaring Twenties. The chaos can literally be felt by the reader and the optimism and depression are right around the corner. The other characters round out the novel. Some play a large part while others are merely passersby. The plot was not exactly new, but the author made the plot feel new. Between the setting and the main characters, this book was actually pretty good. This book is recommended to adult readers.
MaureenST More than 1 year ago
The Baroness will grab you from the first page forward. It has it all and will leave you wanting more. This book is Lilly's story, and Rosie's .....and we begin in Romantic Paris. French fashion, hair dos, booze, gardens, and aeroplanes! A Parisian air plane ride unlocks a passion in Lilly, that she takes back to the States. While Rosie wants to unlock her love of acting. Both will get chances to do what they want, but at what cost? You will keep turning the pages as you try to figure out what is coming next? Some is so sad and others are sweet. I for one can't wait for the next book!! Enjoy this totally captivating read! I received this book from the Publisher Sumerside, and was not required to give a positive review.
Heart2Heart More than 1 year ago
Money can't always buy you happiness or love. The Roaring Twenties is not all its cracked up to be, especially when you're Rosie Worth or Lilly Hoyt. While Rosie is the seemingly wild child, wanting to experience the painted faces and short bob's fashionable to the flappers, her cousin Lilly just wants to head back to the ranch she left behind in Montana and creating a haven for buffaloes. Both Rosie and Lilly are the daughters of wealthy families and thus the need to be looked after, especially when their carefree ways take them on paths that their mothers don't desire for them. For Rosie, she falls head in heels in love with a man named Dashielle Parks, whom her mother warns isn't the man for her and isn't the marrying type. When she vows to prove her mother wrong, she soon learns that Dash isn't looking for marriage but merely a good time. Lilly on the other hand finally finds something of an adventure in Paris when she finds herself separated following a celebrity funeral for Sarah Bernhardt. Knowing where she is likely to find her cousin Rosie, she is befriended by a handsome gentleman, named Rennie Dupre' who promises to show her the sights of Paris. None of them is quite so grand as when seen from an airplane flown by Rennie, but does he have his sights set on more than just Lilly's heart or is it Lilly's wealth that he is ultimately after? In the latest novel following Heiress by Susan May Warren, Baroness catches up with the Daughters of Fortune series and follows the chaotic lifestyles of two young girls on the heels of trying to find something in life that makes them happy besides money. As both girls struggle to pull away from their parents strong-handed ways of finding what is best for them during this time in history, however, neither set of parents ask what the girls want, thinking they are simply to young to understand their emotions. They do what any wealthy parents would, and threaten them not to see either of their men and whisk them back to New York, thinking that will solve this problem. It doesn't. Rosie and Lilly have a lot to learn in this coming-of-age story of two socialites trying to find their happiness and searching for love and self worth in the process. Susan gives the readers such viable characters to relate to and their journey will leave you breathless by the ending page. Thankfully there will be a sequel to pick up where this cliffhanger will leave you. I received this book compliments of Litfuse Publicity for my honest review and LOVED it just as much as Heiress. It can be read as a stand alone but if you're looking for the back story of their moms, you'll need to pick up the first book. I rate this one a 5 out of 5 stars and can't wait to pick up another Daughter of Fortune novel in the very near future.
ReviewsFromTheHeart on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
The Roaring Twenties is not all its cracked up to be, especially when you're Rosie Worth or Lilly Hoyt. While Rosie is the seemingly wild child, wanting to experience the painted faces and short bob's fashionable to the flappers, her cousin Lilly just wants to head back to the ranch she left behind in Montana and creating a haven for buffaloes.Both Rosie and Lilly are the daughters of wealthy families and thus the need to be looked after, especially when their carefree ways take them on paths that their mothers don't desire for them. For Rosie, she falls head in heels in love with a man named Dashielle Parks, whom her mother warns isn't the man for her and isn't the marrying type. When she vows to prove her mother wrong, she soon learns that Dash isn't looking for marriage but merely a good time.Lilly on the other hand finally finds something of an adventure in Paris when she finds herself separated following a celebrity funeral for Sarah Bernhardt. Knowing where she is likely to find her cousin Rosie, she is befriended by a handsome gentleman, named Rennie Dupre' who promises to show her the sights of Paris. None of them is quite so grand as when seen from an airplane flown by Rennie, but does he have his sights set on more than just Lilly's heart or is it Lilly's wealth that he is ultimately after?In the latest novel following Heiress by Susan May Warren, Baroness catches up with the Daughters of Fortune series and follows the chaotic lifestyles of two young girls on the heels of trying to find something in life that makes them happy besides money. As both girls struggle to pull away from their parents strong-handed ways of finding what is best for them during this time in history, however, neither set of parents ask what the girls want, thinking they are simply to young to understand their emotions.They do what any wealthy parents would, and threaten them not to see either of their men and whisk them back to New York, thinking that will solve this problem. It doesn't. Rosie and Lilly have a lot to learn in this coming-of-age story of two socialites trying to find their happiness and searching for love and self worth in the process. Susan gives the readers such viable characters to relate to and their journey will leave you breathless by the ending page. Thankfully there will be a sequel to pick up where this cliffhanger will leave you.I received this book compliments of Litfuse Publicity for my honest review and LOVED it just as much as Heiress. It can be read as a stand alone but if you're looking for the back story of their moms, you'll need to pick up the first book. I rate this one a 5 out of 5 stars and can't wait to pick up another Daughter of Fortune novel in the very near future.
BrokenTeepee on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Rosie and Lilly are cousins who, at the start of this novel are in Paris each longing for what they don't have; Rosie for the freedom to be a star on the stage and marry whom she would like and Lilly to go back to her ranch in Montana. Both are children of money and privilege and yet both feel constrained by the life they feel they are being forced to live. Being young ladies of seventeen or so they, of course, know everything and their parents cannot possibly understand that the times they are a'changin' and things are just not done they way they were back then.The book moves from Paris to New York and then to the Midwest as Rosie and Lilly try to shake the family bonds they feel bind them so tightly. I did not quite understand the dynamic of the almost hatred these girls had for their families. Perhaps if I had read the first book in the series I might have had a better understanding, I don't know but it seemed to be there simply to send these two off on their adventures. Adventures that they seemed to survive quite well despite being fairly pampered young women of money. Little was discussed of how they managed to have enough money to live but long strands of pearls seem to be an ongoing theme. And neither girl ends up or ever was a Baroness so the title baffles me.It took me a bit to get involved in the story but once I did I found it to be a fast read - I ended up finishing it in one day. I can't say that I cared for Rosie at all. Lilly was a more well rounded character. The parents were there to provide a sounding board and or maybe I should say dart board for the girls' reasons for doing what they did. The book had little happiness in it and it does not leave much hope for the next chapter as the Great Depression is looming.
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Finished it about 11:00 last night! Great book!