Barron's Italian-English Pocket Dictionary: 70,000 words, phrases & examples presented in two sections: American style English to Italian -- Italian to English

Barron's Italian-English Pocket Dictionary: 70,000 words, phrases & examples presented in two sections: American style English to Italian -- Italian to English

by Roberta Martignon-Burgholte, Andreas Cyffka

Paperback(Second Edition)

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Overview

Compiled and edited by native bilingual speakers, Barron's Italian-English Pocket Dictionary contains approximately 70,000 words. Abridged from Barron’s comprehensive, full-size bilingual dictionary, this lightweight, easy-to-use pocket guide is ideal for students and travelers.

This revised edition features:

  • Entries organized in two sections: American-style English to Italian, and translations from Italian to American-style English
  • Each headword is listed with its translation, part of speech, and pronunciation
  • Phrases follow each definition using headwords in standard contexts
  • Separate bilingual lists present numerals, abbreviations, and more
  • Entries for computers, the Internet, and information technology

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781438006093
Publisher: Barrons Educational Series
Publication date: 09/01/2015
Series: Barron's Pocket Bilingual Dictionaries Series
Edition description: Second Edition
Pages: 992
Sales rank: 93,391
Product dimensions: 4.00(w) x 6.10(h) x 1.80(d)

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Barron's Italian-English Pocket Dictionary: 70,000 words, phrases & examples presented in two sections: American style English to Italian -- Italian t 1 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Visiting More than 1 year ago
The editors of this second edition ruined this edition by switching from the pronunciation scheme of the better first edition to a complex, inaccurate pronunciation scheme for this edition in a failed effort to appear street-cool. It manages to be both needlessly complex and very inaccurate, to boot. If it isn't broke, don't fix it. I'd recommend either the Bantam New College dictionary, or the LaRousse Pocket dictionary, which is carried by all of the B&Ns which I have checked.