ISBN-10:
0130903000
ISBN-13:
9780130903006
Pub. Date:
07/01/2001
Publisher:
Pearson Education
Basic Business Statistics: Concepts and Applications / Edition 8

Basic Business Statistics: Concepts and Applications / Edition 8

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Overview

The MyPHLIP (Prentice Hall's Learning on the Internet Partnership) Companion Web site is your personal guide to the free online resources for your book. It's the most advanced, text-specific site available on the Web!

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780130903006
Publisher: Pearson Education
Publication date: 07/01/2001
Edition description: Older Edition
Pages: 870
Product dimensions: 7.99(w) x 10.00(h) x 0.59(d)

Read an Excerpt

Educational Philosophy

In our many years of teaching introductory statistics courses, we have continually searched for ways to improve the teaching of these courses. Our vision for teaching these introductory business statistics courses has been shaped by active participation in a series of Making Statistics More Effective in Schools of Business, Decision Sciences Institute, and American Statistical Association conferences as well as the reality of serving a diverse group of students at large universities. Over the years, our vision has come to include these principles:

  1. Students need a frame of reference when learning statistics, especially since statistics is not their major. That frame of reference for business students should be the functional areas of business—that is, accounting, economics and finance, information systems, management, and marketing. Each statistical topic needs to be presented in an applied context related to at least one of these functional areas.
  2. Virtually all the students taking introductory business statistics courses are majoring in areas other than statistics. Introductory courses should focus on underlying principles that nonstatistics majors will find useful.
  3. The use of spreadsheet and/or statistical software should be integrated into all aspects of an introductory statistics course. In the workplace, spreadsheet software (and sometimes statistical software) is usually available on a decision maker's desktop. Our teaching approach needs to recognize this reality, and we need to make our courses more consistent with the workplace environment.
  4. Textbooks that use software must provide enoughinstructions that students can effectively use the software, without the software (and instruction) dominating the course.
  5. The focus in teaching each topic should be on the application of the topic to a functional area of business, the interpretation of results, the presentation of assumptions, the evaluation of the assumptions, and the discussion of what should be done if the assumptions are violated. These points are particularly important in regression and forecasting and in hypothesis testing. Although the illustration of some computations is inevitable, the focus on computations should be minimized.
  6. Both classroom examples and homework exercises should relate to actual or realistic data as much as possible. Students should work with data sets, both small and large, and be encouraged to look beyond the statistical analysis of data to the interpretation of results in a managerial context.
  7. Introductory courses should avoid an overconcentration on one topic area (such as hypothesis testing) and instead provide breadth of coverage of a variety of statistical topics. This will help students avoid the "I can't see the forest from the trees" syndrome.

New to This Edition

This new eighth edition of Basic Business Statistics: Concepts and Applications has been vastly improved in a number of important areas.

APPLICATIONS

Updated and improved Using Statistics business scenarios—Each chapter begins with a Using Statistics example that shows how statistics can be used in one of the functional areas of business—accounting, finance, information systems, management, or marketing. This scenario is used throughout the chapter to provide an applied context for the concepts. The following are the Using Statistics scenarios presented throughout the book:

  • Hundreds of new applied examples and exercises, with data from the Wall Street Journal, USA Today, and other sources have been added to the text.
  • Visual Explorations—Provided on the book's accompanying CDROM are visual explorations that allow students to interactively explore important statistical concepts in descriptive statistics, probability, the normal distribution, and regression analysis. For example, in descriptive statistics, students observe the effect of changes in the data on the average, median, quartiles, and standard deviation. In sampling distributions, students use simulation to explore the effect of sample size on a probability distribution. With the normal distribution, students see the effect of changes in the mean and standard deviation on the areas under the normal curve. In regression analysis, students have the opportunity of fitting a line and observing how changes in the slope and intercept affect the goodness of fit of the fitted line.
  • Using Microsoft Office is a new feature. Located at the ends of chapters 2 and 3, this feature enables the student to prepare reports by using Microsoft Office tools. This section shows stepbystep how to paste Microsoft Excel tables and charts into a Microsoft Word document and how to prepare PowerPoint presentations.

EXERCISES

  • Answers to most evennumbered exercises are provided at the end of the book.
  • Report Writing Exercises allow students to place the results of an analysis in a business context by incorporating Microsoft Office techniques such as pasting ' Microsoft Excel tables and charts into a Microsoft Word document and PowerPoint 1 presentation.
  • Internet Exercises, located on the book's web site, allow students to explore data sources that are available on the World Wide Web.
  • Case Studies and Team Projects—Detailed case studies are included at the ends of many chapters. The Springville Herald case is included at the end of most chapters as an integrating theme. A team project relating to mutual funds is also included at the end of most chapters as an integrating theme.

SOFTWARE

  • Emphasis on data analysis and interpretation of computer output—We take the position that the use of computer software (Microsoft Excel or a statistical software package such as Minitab) is an integral part of learning statistics. Our focus emphasizes analyzing data, interpreting the output from Microsoft Excel and Minitab, and explaining how to use this software while reducing emphasis on doing computations. Therefore, we have added a great deal of computer output and integrated this output into the fabric of the text. For example, in the coverage of tables and charts in Chapter 2, the focus is on the interpretation of various charts, not on their construction by hand. In our coverage of hypothesis testing in Chapters 9 through 12, extensive computer output has been included so that the pvalue approach can be used. In our coverage of simple linear regression in Chapter 13, it is assumed that Microsoft Excel or Minitab will be used, and thus the focus is on the interpretation of the output and not on hand calculations (which have been placed in a separate section of the chapter).
  • PHStat2 is Prentice Hall's Excel addin, which provides a custom menu of topics that supplement the Data Analysis Tool of Microsoft Excel. Using Excel and PHStat2, the user is able to perform statistical analysis for virtually all the topics that would be covered in a twoterm business statistics course at the introductory level. PHStat2, an updated version of PHStat, includes new features such as tables, charts, and a help system.
  • Endofchapter appendices on Microsoft Excel and Minitab, with screen shots, provide easytofollow instructions.

CONTENT CHANGES IN THE EIGHTH EDITION

  • Chapters 1 and 2 have been combined into a single chapter ("Introduction and Data Collection"). This updated chapter provides explanation of how to obtain data from the World Wide Web, contains additional chapter review problems on accessing the World Wide Web, and contains a new Using Statistics example involving an ecommerce company.
  • Chapter 2 ("Presenting Data in Tables and Charts") contains an updated Using Statistics example, new graphical excellence examples, a section on the scatter diagram, and a section on placing Microsoft Excel worksheet data and charts into Microsoft Word documents.
  • Chapter 3 ("Descriptive Statistics") contains an updated Using Statistics example, additional integration of Excel and Minitab output, coverage of the correlation coefficient, coverage of the geometric mean (which finance students especially need), a Visual Explorations module for descriptive statistics, and placing Microsoft Excel worksheet data and charts in PowerPoint presentations.
  • Chapter 4 ("Basic Probability") includes an appendix on PHStat2.
  • Chapter 5 ("Some Important Discrete Probability Distributions") changes the Using Statistics binomial example to an accounting information system, moves covariance so that it follows expected value, and uses an example with a negative covariance.
  • Chapter 6 ("The Normal Distribution") changes the Using Statistics example to an Internet example, uses only the cumulative normal table, integrates Excel and Minitab output into the normal distribution section, and contains a Visual Exploration module for the normal distribution.
  • Chapter 7 ("Sampling Distributions") streamlines the introductory section, contains a visual exploration module for sampling distributions, contains a Visual Explorations module for sampling distributions, and puts the section on the finite population correction factor on the CDROM.
  • Chapter 8 ("Confidence Interval Estimation") adds onesided confidence intervals to the section on auditing and moves the finite population correction factor to the CDROM.
  • Chapter 9 ("Fundamentals of Hypothesis Testing: OneSample Tests") adds computer output to all sections and combines sections 9.2 and 9.3 so that pvalue is not a separate section.
  • Chapter 10 ("TwoSample Tests with Numerical Data") changes the Using Statistics example to one related to marketing, provides additional emphasis on pvalues, and adds the confidence interval estimate for the difference between two means.
  • Chapter 11 ("Analysis of Variance") changes the Using Statistics example, adds computer output, provides additional emphasis on pvalues and substitutes the modified Levene test for the Hartley test.
  • Chapter 12 ("Tests for Two or More Samples with Categorical Data") adds the confidence interval estimate for the difference between two proportions.
  • Chapter 13 ("Simple Linear Regression") adds additional coverage of PHStat2 and contains a Visual Explorations module on regression.
  • Chapter 14 ("Introduction to Multiple Regression") changes the Using Statistics example to a marketing problem.
  • Chapter 15 ("Multiple Regression and Model Building") includes additional discussion of interaction terms in multiple regression and adds new PHStat2 features to the section on stepwise regression and confidence intervals for the mean response.
  • Chapter 16 ("TimeSeries Analysis") changes the Using Statistics example and adds a section on index numbers that is on the CDROM.
  • Chapter 17 ("Decision Making") has been moved after regression and time series forecasting and adds a section on PHStat2.
  • Chapter 18 ("Statistical Applications in Quality and Productivity Management") has been moved after the regression and time series chapters and adds a section on process capability.

SUPPLEMENT PACKAGE

The supplement package that accompanies this text includes the following:

  • Instructor's Solution Manual—This manual includes extra detail in the problem solutions and many Excel and Minitab solutions.
  • Student Solutions Manual—This manual provides detailed solutions to virtually all the evennumbered exercises.
  • Test Item File—This supplement includes extra Excelbased test questions.
  • Instructor's CD/ROM—The instructor's CDROM contains PowerPoint slides, the Instructor's Solutions Manual and Test Item File, and Prentice Hall's Custom Test Manager.
  • PHStat2—This is a statistical addin for Microsoft Excel. The data files for the examples and exercises are contained on the CDROM that accompanies the text.
  • MyPHLIP Web site—This site contains additional problems, teaching tips, tips for students, current events exercises, practice exams, and links to other sites that contain statistical data.
  • Student version of Minitab—For a reasonable additional cost, a student version of Minitab can be packaged with this text. To order this package, use ISBN 0130720402.

This site incorporates the features of MyPHLIP (Prentice Hall's Learning on the Internet Partnership), a robust Web site that provides many resources for both faculty members and students. A partial list of the features includes:

  • Teaching tips
  • Links to other sites that provide data appropriate for statistics courses
  • Student tips
  • Sample exams
  • Current event exercises
  • Internet exercises

Table of Contents

Prefacexv
1Introduction and Data Collection1
1.1Why a Manager Needs to Know about Statistics2
1.2The Growth and Development of Modern Statistics4
1.3What Readers of This Textbook Need to Know about Microsoft Excel and PHStat or Minitab5
1.4Why Data are Needed6
1.5Sources of Data7
1.6Types of Data10
1.7Design of Survey Research15
1.8Types of Sampling Methods17
1.9Evaluating Survey Worthiness23
2Presenting Data in Tables and Charts45
2.1Organizing Numerical Data46
2.2Tables and Charts for Numerical Data50
2.3Graphing Bivariate Numerical Data58
2.4Tables and Charts for Categorical Data61
2.5Tabulating and Graphing Bivariate Categorical Data68
2.6Graphical Excellence71
3Numerical Descriptive Measures95
3.1Exploring Numerical Data and Their Properties96
3.2Measures of Central Tendency, Variation, and Shape97
3.3Exploratory Data Analysis116
3.4Obtaining Descriptive Summary Measures from a Population121
3.5The Coefficient of Correlation126
3.6Pitfalls in Numerical Descriptive Measures and Ethical Issues130
3.7Obtaining Descriptive Summary Measures from a Frequency Distribution (CD-ROM Topic)131
4Basic Probability145
4.1Basic Probability Concepts147
4.2Conditional Probability156
4.3Bayes' Theorem164
4.4Ethical Issues and Probability167
5Some Important Discrete Probability Distributions173
5.1The Probability Distribution for a Discrete Random Variable174
5.2Covariance and Its Application in Finance177
5.3Binomial Distribution182
5.4Poisson Distribution190
5.5Hypergeometric Distribution193
6The Normal Distribution and Other Continuous Distributions205
6.1The Normal Distribution206
6.2Evaluating the Normality Assumption223
6.3The Exponential Distribution231
7Sampling Distributions241
7.1Sampling Distribution of the Mean242
7.2Sampling Distribution of the Proportion254
7.3Sampling from Finite Populations (CD-ROM Topic)257
8Confidence Interval Estimation263
8.1Confidence Interval Estimation of the Mean ([sigma] Known)265
8.2Confidence Interval Estimation of the Mean ([sigma] Unknown)269
8.3Confidence Interval Estimation for the Proportion276
8.4Determining Sample Size279
8.5Applications of Confidence Interval Estimation in Auditing286
8.6Confidence Interval Estimation and Ethical Issues294
8.7Estimation and Sample Size Determination for Finite Populations (CD-ROM Topic)294
9Fundamentals of Hypothesis Testing: One-Sample Tests307
9.1Hypothesis-Testing Methology308
9.2Z Test of Hypothesis for the Mean ([sigma] Known)313
9.3One-Tail Tests320
9.4tTest of Hypothesis for the Mean ([sigma] Unknown)323
9.5Z Test of Hypothesis for the Proportion329
9.6X[superscript 2] Test of Hypothesis for the Variance or Standard Deviation332
9.7The Power of a Test (CD-ROM Topic)336
9.8Potential Hypothesis-Testing Pitfalls and Ethical Issues336
10Two-Sample Tests with Numerical Data347
10.1Comparing Two Independent Samples: t Tests for Differences in Two Means348
10.2F Test for Difference in Two Variances357
10.3Comparing Two Related Samples: t Test for the Mean Difference364
10.4Wilcoxon Rank Sum Test for Differences in Two Medians372
10.5Wilcoxon Signed-Ranks Test for the Median Difference (CD-ROM Topic)378
11Analysis of Variance391
11.1The Completely Randomized Design: One-Way Analysis of Variance392
11.2The Randomized Block Design407
11.3The Factorial Design: Two-Way Analysis of Variance417
11.4Kruskal-Wallis Rank Test for Differences in c Medians429
11.5Friedman Rank Test for Differences in c Medians (CD-ROM Topic)434
12Tests for Two or More Samples with Categorical Data449
12.1Z Test for the Difference Between Two Proportions450
12.2x[superscript 2] Test for the Difference Between Two Proportions456
12.3x[superscript 2] Test for Differences in More Than Two Proportions463
12.4x[superscript 2] Test of Independence471
13Simple Linear Regression487
13.1Types of Regression Models488
13.2Determining the Simple Linear Regression Equation490
13.3Measures of Variation498
13.4Assumptions503
13.5Residual Analysis504
13.6Measuring Autocorrelation: The Durbin-Watson Statistic509
13.7Inferences about the Slope and Correlation Coefficient514
13.8Estimation of Mean Values and Prediction of Individual Values521
13.9Pitfalls in Regression and Ethical Issues525
13.10Computations in Simple Linear Regression529
14Introduction to Multiple Regression549
14.1Developing the Multiple Regression Model550
14.2Residual Analysis for the Multiple Regression Model559
14.3Influence Analysis561
14.4Testing for the Significance of the Multiple Regression Model564
14.5Inferences Concerning the Population Regression Coefficients566
14.6Testing Portions of the Multiple Regression Model570
14.7Logistic Regression577
15Multiple Regression Model Building589
15.1The Quadratic Regression Model590
15.2Dummy-Variable Models599
15.3Using Transformations in Regression Models608
15.4Collinearity611
15.5Model Building613
15.6Pitfalls in Multiple Regression and Ethical Issues624
16Time-Series Analysis635
16.1The Importance of Business Forecasting636
16.2Component Factors of the Classical Multiplicative Time-Series Model637
16.3Smoothing the Annual Time Series639
16.4Least-Squares Trend Fitting and Forecasting646
16.5The Holt-Winters Method for Trend Fitting and Forecasting659
16.6Autoregressive Modeling for Trend Fitting and Forecasting663
16.7Choosing an Appropriate Forecasting Model672
16.8Time-Series Forecasting of Monthly or Quarterly Data677
16.9Pitfalls Concerning Time-Series Analysis685
16.10Index Numbers (CD-ROM Topic)685
17Decision Making695
17.1The Payoff Table and Decision Trees696
17.2Criteria for Decision Making700
17.3Decision Making with Sample Information708
17.4Utility713
18Statistical Applications in Quality and Productivity Management721
18.1Quality and Productivity: A Historical Perspective723
18.2Deming's 14 Points: A Theory of Management723
18.3The Theory of Control Charts726
18.4Control Chart for the Proportion of Nonconforming Items--The p Chart728
18.5The Red Bead Experiment: Understanding Process Variability734
18.6Control Chart for An Area of Opportunity--The c Chart737
18.7Control Charts for the Range and the Mean (X)741
18.8Process Capability748
Appendices781
A.Review of Arithmetic, Alegbra, and Logarithms781
B.Summation Notation785
C.Statistical Symbols and Greek Alphabet791
D.CD-ROM Contents793
E.Tables807
F.More About PHStat2839
Index843
CD-ROM Topics
3.7Obtaining Descriptive Summary Measures1
7.3Sampling from Finite Populations1
8.7Estimation and Sample Size Determination for Finite Populations1
9.7The Power of a Test1
10.5Wilcoxon Signed-Ranks Test for the Median Difference1
11.5Freidman Rank Test for Differences in C Medians1
16.10Index Numbers1

Preface

Educational Philosophy

In our many years of teaching introductory statistics courses, we have continually searched for ways to improve the teaching of these courses. Our vision for teaching these introductory business statistics courses has been shaped by active participation in a series of Making Statistics More Effective in Schools of Business, Decision Sciences Institute, and American Statistical Association conferences as well as the reality of serving a diverse group of students at large universities. Over the years, our vision has come to include these principles:

  1. Students need a frame of reference when learning statistics, especially since statistics is not their major. That frame of reference for business students should be the functional areas of business—that is, accounting, economics and finance, information systems, management, and marketing. Each statistical topic needs to be presented in an applied context related to at least one of these functional areas.
  2. Virtually all the students taking introductory business statistics courses are majoring in areas other than statistics. Introductory courses should focus on underlying principles that non-statistics majors will find useful.
  3. The use of spreadsheet and/or statistical software should be integrated into all aspects of an introductory statistics course. In the workplace, spreadsheet software (and sometimes statistical software) is usually available on a decision maker's desktop. Our teaching approach needs to recognize this reality, and we need to make our courses more consistent with the workplace environment.
  4. Textbooks that use software must provide enoughinstructions that students can effectively use the software, without the software (and instruction) dominating the course.
  5. The focus in teaching each topic should be on the application of the topic to a functional area of business, the interpretation of results, the presentation of assumptions, the evaluation of the assumptions, and the discussion of what should be done if the assumptions are violated. These points are particularly important in regression and forecasting and in hypothesis testing. Although the illustration of some computations is inevitable, the focus on computations should be minimized.
  6. Both classroom examples and homework exercises should relate to actual or realistic data as much as possible. Students should work with data sets, both small and large, and be encouraged to look beyond the statistical analysis of data to the interpretation of results in a managerial context.
  7. Introductory courses should avoid an overconcentration on one topic area (such as hypothesis testing) and instead provide breadth of coverage of a variety of statistical topics. This will help students avoid the "I can't see the forest from the trees" syndrome.

New to This Edition

This new eighth edition of Basic Business Statistics: Concepts and Applications has been vastly improved in a number of important areas.

APPLICATIONS

Updated and improved Using Statistics business scenarios—Each chapter begins with a Using Statistics example that shows how statistics can be used in one of the functional areas of business—accounting, finance, information systems, management, or marketing. This scenario is used throughout the chapter to provide an applied context for the concepts. The following are the Using Statistics scenarios presented throughout the book:

  • Hundreds of new applied examples and exercises, with data from the Wall Street Journal, USA Today, and other sources have been added to the text.
  • Visual Explorations—Provided on the book's accompanying CD-ROM are visual explorations that allow students to interactively explore important statistical concepts in descriptive statistics, probability, the normal distribution, and regression analysis. For example, in descriptive statistics, students observe the effect of changes in the data on the average, median, quartiles, and standard deviation. In sampling distributions, students use simulation to explore the effect of sample size on a probability distribution. With the normal distribution, students see the effect of changes in the mean and standard deviation on the areas under the normal curve. In regression analysis, students have the opportunity of fitting a line and observing how changes in the slope and intercept affect the goodness of fit of the fitted line.
  • Using Microsoft Office is a new feature. Located at the ends of chapters 2 and 3, this feature enables the student to prepare reports by using Microsoft Office tools. This section shows step-by-step how to paste Microsoft Excel tables and charts into a Microsoft Word document and how to prepare PowerPoint presentations.

EXERCISES

  • Answers to most even-numbered exercises are provided at the end of the book.
  • Report Writing Exercises allow students to place the results of an analysis in a business context by incorporating Microsoft Office techniques such as pasting ' Microsoft Excel tables and charts into a Microsoft Word document and PowerPoint 1 presentation.
  • Internet Exercises, located on the book's web site, allow students to explore data sources that are available on the World Wide Web.
  • Case Studies and Team Projects—Detailed case studies are included at the ends of many chapters. The Springville Herald case is included at the end of most chapters as an integrating theme. A team project relating to mutual funds is also included at the end of most chapters as an integrating theme.

SOFTWARE

  • Emphasis on data analysis and interpretation of computer output—We take the position that the use of computer software (Microsoft Excel or a statistical software package such as Minitab) is an integral part of learning statistics. Our focus emphasizes analyzing data, interpreting the output from Microsoft Excel and Minitab, and explaining how to use this software while reducing emphasis on doing computations. Therefore, we have added a great deal of computer output and integrated this output into the fabric of the text. For example, in the coverage of tables and charts in Chapter 2, the focus is on the interpretation of various charts, not on their construction by hand. In our coverage of hypothesis testing in Chapters 9 through 12, extensive computer output has been included so that the p-value approach can be used. In our coverage of simple linear regression in Chapter 13, it is assumed that Microsoft Excel or Minitab will be used, and thus the focus is on the interpretation of the output and not on hand calculations (which have been placed in a separate section of the chapter).
  • PHStat2 is Prentice Hall's Excel add-in, which provides a custom menu of topics that supplement the Data Analysis Tool of Microsoft Excel. Using Excel and PHStat2, the user is able to perform statistical analysis for virtually all the topics that would be covered in a two-term business statistics course at the introductory level. PHStat2, an updated version of PHStat, includes new features such as tables, charts, and a help system.
  • End-of-chapter appendices on Microsoft Excel and Minitab, with screen shots, provide easy-to-follow instructions.

CONTENT CHANGES IN THE EIGHTH EDITION

  • Chapters 1 and 2 have been combined into a single chapter ("Introduction and Data Collection"). This updated chapter provides explanation of how to obtain data from the World Wide Web, contains additional chapter review problems on accessing the World Wide Web, and contains a new Using Statistics example involving an e-commerce company.
  • Chapter 2 ("Presenting Data in Tables and Charts") contains an updated Using Statistics example, new graphical excellence examples, a section on the scatter diagram, and a section on placing Microsoft Excel worksheet data and charts into Microsoft Word documents.
  • Chapter 3 ("Descriptive Statistics") contains an updated Using Statistics example, additional integration of Excel and Minitab output, coverage of the correlation coefficient, coverage of the geometric mean (which finance students especially need), a Visual Explorations module for descriptive statistics, and placing Microsoft Excel worksheet data and charts in PowerPoint presentations.
  • Chapter 4 ("Basic Probability") includes an appendix on PHStat2.
  • Chapter 5 ("Some Important Discrete Probability Distributions") changes the Using Statistics binomial example to an accounting information system, moves covariance so that it follows expected value, and uses an example with a negative covariance.
  • Chapter 6 ("The Normal Distribution") changes the Using Statistics example to an Internet example, uses only the cumulative normal table, integrates Excel and Minitab output into the normal distribution section, and contains a Visual Exploration module for the normal distribution.
  • Chapter 7 ("Sampling Distributions") streamlines the introductory section, contains a visual exploration module for sampling distributions, contains a Visual Explorations module for sampling distributions, and puts the section on the finite population correction factor on the CDROM.
  • Chapter 8 ("Confidence Interval Estimation") adds one-sided confidence intervals to the section on auditing and moves the finite population correction factor to the CDROM.
  • Chapter 9 ("Fundamentals of Hypothesis Testing: One-Sample Tests") adds computer output to all sections and combines sections 9.2 and 9.3 so that p-value is not a separate section.
  • Chapter 10 ("Two-Sample Tests with Numerical Data") changes the Using Statistics example to one related to marketing, provides additional emphasis on p-values, and adds the confidence interval estimate for the difference between two means.
  • Chapter 11 ("Analysis of Variance") changes the Using Statistics example, adds computer output, provides additional emphasis on p-values and substitutes the modified Levene test for the Hartley test.
  • Chapter 12 ("Tests for Two or More Samples with Categorical Data") adds the confidence interval estimate for the difference between two proportions.
  • Chapter 13 ("Simple Linear Regression") adds additional coverage of PHStat2 and contains a Visual Explorations module on regression.
  • Chapter 14 ("Introduction to Multiple Regression") changes the Using Statistics example to a marketing problem.
  • Chapter 15 ("Multiple Regression and Model Building") includes additional discussion of interaction terms in multiple regression and adds new PHStat2 features to the section on stepwise regression and confidence intervals for the mean response.
  • Chapter 16 ("Time-Series Analysis") changes the Using Statistics example and adds a section on index numbers that is on the CD-ROM.
  • Chapter 17 ("Decision Making") has been moved after regression and time series forecasting and adds a section on PHStat2.
  • Chapter 18 ("Statistical Applications in Quality and Productivity Management") has been moved after the regression and time series chapters and adds a section on process capability.

SUPPLEMENT PACKAGE

The supplement package that accompanies this text includes the following:

  • Instructor's Solution Manual—This manual includes extra detail in the problem solutions and many Excel and Minitab solutions.
  • Student Solutions Manual—This manual provides detailed solutions to virtually all the even-numbered exercises.
  • Test Item File—This supplement includes extra Excel-based test questions.
  • Instructor's CD/ROM—The instructor's CD-ROM contains PowerPoint slides, the Instructor's Solutions Manual and Test Item File, and Prentice Hall's Custom Test Manager.
  • PHStat2—This is a statistical add-in for Microsoft Excel. The data files for the examples and exercises are contained on the CD-ROM that accompanies the text.
  • MyPHLIP Web site—This site contains additional problems, teaching tips, tips for students, current events exercises, practice exams, and links to other sites that contain statistical data.
  • Student version of Minitab—For a reasonable additional cost, a student version of Minitab can be packaged with this text. To order this package, use ISBN 0-13-072040-2.

ABOUT THE WORLD WIDE WEB

The text has a home page on the World Wide Web.

This site incorporates the features of MyPHLIP (Prentice Hall's Learning on the Internet Partnership), a robust Web site that provides many resources for both faculty members and students. A partial list of the features includes:

  • Teaching tips
  • Links to other sites that provide data appropriate for statistics courses
  • Student tips
  • Sample exams
  • Current event exercises
  • Internet exercises

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Basic Business Statistics: Concepts and Applications, (2-downloads) 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I think this book should come with a solutions with all the problems instead of leaving you in the dark.