Battle Born [Deluxe Edition]

Battle Born [Deluxe Edition]

by The Killers

CD(Special Edition)

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Product Details

Release Date: 09/18/2012
Label: Island
UPC: 0602537118755
catalogNumber: 001729502
Rank: 16288

Album Credits

Performance Credits

Killers   Primary Artist
Damian Taylor   Keyboards
Stuart Price   Keyboards
Isaac Tubb   Trumpet
Nate Kimball   Trombone
Alissa Fleming   Violin
Vegas Master Singers   Background Vocals
Jennifer Eriksson   Violin

Technical Credits

Daniel Lanois   Composer,Producer
Steve Lillywhite   Producer,Additional Production
Brendan O'Brien   Producer,Engineer
Doug Joswick   Package Production
Jacques Lu Cont   Remixing
Damian Taylor   Programming,Producer,Additional Production
Stuart Price   Programming,Producer
Killers   Composer,Producer
Brandon Flowers   Composer
David Keuning   Composer
Mark Stoermer   Composer
Ronnie Vannucci   Composer
Robert Root   Engineer
Warren Fu   Art Direction
Kristen Yiengst   Artwork,Photo Production
Martin Gomez   Layout

Customer Reviews

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Battle Born 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 4 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I love Battle Born. It's a great album that is pretty different from what they've released in the past and I'm loving it.
DMG80 More than 1 year ago
Battle Born is not a Killers album; it is another Brandon Flowers solo album—the sequel to Flamingo, if you will. It is vast, anthemic, incredibly polished, and lacking the beloved grit and angst of quintessential Killers sound a la Sam's Town. Having six producers on the album is a bit excessive and, in my opinion, too many cooks in the kitchen. The album is almost too mature. I feel like it didn't write itself, but rather, Flowers and Co. set out to accomplish a certain plethora of sound—steroidal cognizance of the end goal sabotaging the natural songwriting progression, which, in the process, negates a crucial organicity. Therein lies the inherent difference between Battle Born and The Killers' first few albums, their last phenomenal offering to date being Sawdust, its collection of B-sides and unreleased tracks from the Hot Fuss and Sam's Town era proving far more infectious than anything on Battle Born. There comes a point in every artist's career when they become too conscious of their work and try to do too much. This is okay. It's all part of the process. While Flowers' voice sounds unequivocally grand and on point, I'm still left with the pervasive feeling that any time spent listening to Battle Born could be spent listening to an edgier, more authentic Killers, e.g., "Bling" and "Uncle Johnny." Nonetheless, I'm glad they're not trying to recreate the same formula. I'm glad they're arguably overthinking things and releasing an enjoyable work that's a fully realized triumph with respect to its intent, yet a concurrent misstep. Oftentimes a Battle Born is rendered before another masterpiece is furnished. 3.5 stars.
DMG80 More than 1 year ago
Battle Born is not a Killers album; it is another Brandon Flowers solo album—the sequel to Flamingo, if you will. It is vast, anthemic, incredibly polished, and lacking the beloved grit and angst of quintessential Killers sound a la Sam's Town. Having six producers on the album is a bit excessive and, in my opinion, too many cooks in the kitchen. The album is almost too mature. I feel like it didn't write itself, but rather, Flowers and Co. set out to accomplish a certain plethora of sound—steroidal cognizance of the end goal sabotaging the natural songwriting progression, which, in the process, negates a crucial organicity. Therein lies the inherent difference between Battle Born and The Killers' first few albums, their last phenomenal offering to date being Sawdust, its collection of B-sides and unreleased tracks from the Hot Fuss and Sam's Town era proving far more infectious than anything on Battle Born. There comes a point in every artist's career when they become too conscious of their work and try to do too much. This is okay. It's all part of the process. While Flowers' voice sounds unequivocally grand and on point, I'm still left with the pervasive feeling that any time spent listening to Battle Born could be spent listening to an edgier, more authentic Killers, e.g., "Bling" and "Uncle Johnny." Nonetheless, I'm glad they're not trying to recreate the same formula. I'm glad they're arguably overthinking things and releasing an enjoyable work that's a fully realized triumph with respect to its intent, yet a concurrent misstep. Oftentimes a Battle Born is rendered before another masterpiece is furnished. 3.5 stars.