ISBN-10:
0130916129
ISBN-13:
2900130916128
Pub. Date:
08/28/2001
Publisher:
Pearson
Being A Health Unit Coordinator / Edition 5

Being A Health Unit Coordinator / Edition 5

by Kay Cox-Stevens
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Overview

Kay Cox-Stevens

Retaining an emphasis on the patient-centered approach, Kay Cox-Stevens' Being A Health Unit Coordinator continues to provide the information health unit coordinators must comprehend. This up-to-date text is appropriate for students enrolled in unit coordinating programs or as a reference for those that are practicing. It moves from the simple to the complex, laying a foundation of skills necessary for all medical-clerical workers, then follows with more specific health unit coordinating procedures. New medication information, review questions, learning activities, and updated chapter information, make the new Fifth Edition an even more current and complete reference for success.

Features
  • The newest information on diagnostic and therapeutic orders.
  • More information on the impact of managed care on the heath care facility.
  • New information on medical records management.
  • An update on medical laws and ethics.
  • An update on new medications.
  • Learning activities with critical thinking questions.

Other Titles of Interest
Marshall, Being a Medical Clerical Worker, 2/e 0-8359-5147-2
McMiller, Being a Medical Records Clerk, 2/e 0-13-086493-5
Struck, Medical Office Pharmacology 0-8359-5290-8
Dodson, Being a Medical Information Coder, 2/e 0-8359-5333-5
Makely, The Health Care Workers Primer on Professionalism 0-8359-5483-8

Product Details

ISBN-13: 2900130916128
Publisher: Pearson
Publication date: 08/28/2001
Edition description: Subsequent
Pages: 576
Product dimensions: 6.00(w) x 1.25(h) x 9.00(d)

About the Author

This edition of Being a Health Unit Coordinator is once again prepared by Kay Cox-Stevens, R.N., M.A. She is a Professor of Health Sciences at Saddleback College in Mission Viejo, California, and owns a consulting business, Achiever's Development Enterprises. She is a former instructor of health unit coordinators. She is a founding member of NAHUC (The National Association of Health Unit Coordinators) and a former regional representative and Director of Education of that organization. She is the series editor for the Medical Clerical Series and for the Clinical Allied Health textbook series for Career Publishing.

Read an Excerpt

As we begin the new millennium the health care industry will be faced with many challenges and opportunities. Today's sophisticated world of medicine places many demands on health care workers. Advanced technology, government regulations, and the increasingly complex nature of medical care have resulted in a critical need for competent, well-trained, and responsible personnel.

The filch edition of Being a Health Unit Coordinator continues to provide the basic, easy-to-understand, current information necessary to perform the duties of a health unit coordinator. It is designed for students enrolled in unit coordinating programs and as a reference for employed unit coordinators. ORGANIZATION

The text is organized into nineteen chapters and is logically arranged, moving from the simple to the complex. The first nine chapters provide a core of information considered necessary for all medical-clerical workers. The next eight chapters focus on subject matter more specific to the performance of health unit coordinating procedures. Chapter 18 discusses reviewing for the national certification examination, and Chapter 19 contains numerous sets of physicians' orders for order transcription practice.

The objectives are clearly stated and vocabulary words are listed at the beginning of each chapter; key ideas are highlighted; lists of medical terminology and abbreviations are included; and review questions and activities appear at the end of each chapter. NEW FEATURES OF THE FIFTH EDITION

New abbreviations have been added, and new medications have been included and old ones deleted. Chapter 5, Introduction to Body Structure and Function, has beenconsiderably revised and reorganized, and new information has been included. Sets of review questions have been added throughout the chapter to supplement the Learning Activities at the end of the chapter. Chapter 3, The Hospital Departments, also has been reorganized. New information on hepatitis and AIDS has been included in Chapter 6. Chapter 16, Diagnostic and Therapeutic Department Orders, has been extensively revised, with many new tests and treatments added.

This edition contains a list of vocabulary words and their definitions at the beginning of each chapter. Many new learning activities and critical thinking questions as well as new computer assignments using the Internet have been added at the end of the chapters. New artwork has been added to give the book a fresh appearance.

This fifth edition retains the many sets of physicians' orders (many in actual handwritten form) and instructions for scenarios that give students classroom opportunities for real-life practice performing health unit coordinator procedures.

The field of health care is one of rapid change. A textbook cannot be updated as often as new procedures or equipment are adopted by modern health care institutions, nor is it possible for this text to describe every procedure, form, or exact method your hospital will use. However, your instructor keeps informed of these changes and knows the specific ways of doing things in your hospital and in your community.

Now you are ready to study, to think, and to practice. The work you will learn to do is important work. Mastering it will be an accomplishment of which you can be proud. ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

I would like to express my utmost gratitude to the wonderful people at South Coast Medical Center in South Laguna, California, for their generosity in helping me with this revision. I would also especially like to thank NAHUC president Sandy Ayres for her gracious assistance. Thanks also to the people at Brady, Barbara Krawiec, Executive Editor, Health Professions; and Michael Sirinides, Editorial Assistant.

KAY COX-STEVENS, R.N., M.A.

Table of Contents

1. Introduction to Being a Health Unit Coordinator.
2. The Working Environment.
3. The Hospital Departments.
4. Medical Terminology.
5. Introduction to Body Structure and Function.
6. Diseases and Diagnoses.
7. Medical Law and Ethics.
8. Communications.
9. Hospital Safety and Emergencies.
10. Introduction to Management at the Nurses Station.
11. The Patient's Chart.
12. The Health Unit Coordinator and Computers.
13. Introduction to Order Transcription.
14. Understanding Medication Orders.
15. Nursing Procedure Orders.
16. Diagnostic and Therapeutic Department Orders.
17. Health Unit Coordinator Procedures.
18. Review.
19. Order Transcription Practice.
Bibliography.
Index.

Preface

As we begin the new millennium the health care industry will be faced with many challenges and opportunities. Today's sophisticated world of medicine places many demands on health care workers. Advanced technology, government regulations, and the increasingly complex nature of medical care have resulted in a critical need for competent, well-trained, and responsible personnel.

The filch edition of Being a Health Unit Coordinator continues to provide the basic, easy-to-understand, current information necessary to perform the duties of a health unit coordinator. It is designed for students enrolled in unit coordinating programs and as a reference for employed unit coordinators.

ORGANIZATION

The text is organized into nineteen chapters and is logically arranged, moving from the simple to the complex. The first nine chapters provide a core of information considered necessary for all medical-clerical workers. The next eight chapters focus on subject matter more specific to the performance of health unit coordinating procedures. Chapter 18 discusses reviewing for the national certification examination, and Chapter 19 contains numerous sets of physicians' orders for order transcription practice.

The objectives are clearly stated and vocabulary words are listed at the beginning of each chapter; key ideas are highlighted; lists of medical terminology and abbreviations are included; and review questions and activities appear at the end of each chapter.

NEW FEATURES OF THE FIFTH EDITION

New abbreviations have been added, and new medications have been included and old ones deleted. Chapter 5, Introduction to BodyStructure and Function, has been considerably revised and reorganized, and new information has been included. Sets of review questions have been added throughout the chapter to supplement the Learning Activities at the end of the chapter. Chapter 3, The Hospital Departments, also has been reorganized. New information on hepatitis and AIDS has been included in Chapter 6. Chapter 16, Diagnostic and Therapeutic Department Orders, has been extensively revised, with many new tests and treatments added.

This edition contains a list of vocabulary words and their definitions at the beginning of each chapter. Many new learning activities and critical thinking questions as well as new computer assignments using the Internet have been added at the end of the chapters. New artwork has been added to give the book a fresh appearance.

This fifth edition retains the many sets of physicians' orders (many in actual handwritten form) and instructions for scenarios that give students classroom opportunities for real-life practice performing health unit coordinator procedures.

The field of health care is one of rapid change. A textbook cannot be updated as often as new procedures or equipment are adopted by modern health care institutions, nor is it possible for this text to describe every procedure, form, or exact method your hospital will use. However, your instructor keeps informed of these changes and knows the specific ways of doing things in your hospital and in your community.

Now you are ready to study, to think, and to practice. The work you will learn to do is important work. Mastering it will be an accomplishment of which you can be proud.

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

I would like to express my utmost gratitude to the wonderful people at South Coast Medical Center in South Laguna, California, for their generosity in helping me with this revision. I would also especially like to thank NAHUC president Sandy Ayres for her gracious assistance. Thanks also to the people at Brady, Barbara Krawiec, Executive Editor, Health Professions; and Michael Sirinides, Editorial Assistant.

KAY COX-STEVENS, R.N., M.A.

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