Being Peace

Being Peace

Paperback(New Edition)

$14.95 View All Available Formats & Editions
Choose Expedited Shipping at checkout for guaranteed delivery by Wednesday, June 19

Overview

A bestseller with over 250,000 copies sold, Being Peace is the seminal founding work by Zen Master and Nobel Peace Prize nominee Thich Nhat Hanh. With a new introduction by Jack Kornfield and the first update since its release over fifteen years ago, this eloquent meditation on "being peace in order to make peace" is more relevant than ever. A book for everyone concerned about the state of the world and the quality of our lives, it has lost none of its timeliness since it was first published in 1987. It is filled with practical suggestions how to create a more peaceful world "right in the moment we are alive." Contains Thich Nhat Hanh's key practices, including a guide to the practice of reconciliation which has become a peacemaking tool in many other religious traditions.

This beautiful, newly revised edition is the perfect starting point for those who are getting their first introduction to Buddhism as well as a must-have for those already engaged in the tradition.

With illustrations by Mayumi Oda.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781888375404
Publisher: Parallax Press
Publication date: 10/10/2005
Edition description: New Edition
Pages: 128
Sales rank: 89,255
Product dimensions: 7.80(w) x 5.30(h) x 0.50(d)

About the Author

Thich Nhat Hanh is one of the most revered Zen teachers in the world today. His best-selling books include Happiness and Peace Is Every Step. He lives in Plum Village in southwest France, where he teaches the art of mindful living.

Jack Kornfield was trained as a Buddhist monk in Thailand, Burma, and India and has taught around the world since 1974. He also holds a Ph.D. in clinical psychology. He is a co-founder of the Insight Meditation Society and of the Spirit Rock Center and has written several books.

Mayumi Oda (Illustrator) was born in Tokyo, Japan, in 1941. Her paintings are exhibited internationally, and her recent work as an activist includes coordination of the World Court Project, an effort to make nuclear weapons illegal, and helping to establish a women s refuge center in Phnom Penh, Cambodia. Mayumi currently lives, farms, and swims in Kealakekua, Hawaii.

Arnold Kotler (Editor of First Edition) was an ordained student at the San Francisco and Tassajara Zen Centers from 1969 to 1984. He was the founding editor of Parallax Press and now resides in Hawaii.

Table of Contents

Introduction9
1Suffering Is Not Enough13
2The Three Gems21
3Feelings and Perceptions39
4The Heart of Practice51
5Working for Peace65
6Interbeing85
7Meditation in Daily Life109

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See All Customer Reviews

Being Peace 4.4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 28 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This is the first book I've read of his, and am still basking in the soothing effect of his gentle tutorial.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I've been struggling to find an easy reading on Buddhism. Most titles are too technical and I end up getting bored. 'Being peace' is written in a very simple, easy to understand language. I felt as if the author and I were having a conversation. The concepts on the Western philosophy in question are now very clear to me and I am excited to start practicing it.
faithful_scientist on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Thich Nhat Hahn is a treasure to this planet. He is a true conduit for the holy wisdom of the Buddha. His style is plain and easy to understand, but the concepts are deep and ground-shaking.
johnthefireman on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Anything by Thic Nhat Hanh is well worth reading, particularly if you are interested in the contemplative life. This book is no exception.
adamallen on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Thich Nhat Hanh has written a lovely little book on some of the basic precepts of Zen Buddhism. He writes beautifully and uses vivid analogies to bring these ideas to life."Chapter 1: Suffering is Not Enough" is a reminder that we must recognize the beauty that is all around us at all times and not be blinded by the suffering that we face throughout the day. Simple things like a smile, the blue sky, your breathing, or your wellness are as important to recognize as the bad day that you're having."Chapter 2: The Three Gems" gives a high level overview of the three gems of buddhism - Buddha, the awakened one; Dharma, the way of understanding and loving; and Sangha, the community that lives in harmony and awareness."Chapter 3: Feelings and Perceptions" discusses that our feelings are indeed ourselves. We must have our perceptions aligned so that we recognize that we are not separate from our anger, hatred, or greed. As it says, "I am angry. Anger is in me. I am anger." We cannot displace the anger onto someone or something else. We allow the anger to arise, grow, and overwhelm. This is true of all feelings. We must align our perceptions appropriately."Chapter 4: The Heart of Practice" discusses two primary topics that are interrelated. First, It says that meditation is not to escape from society but rather to prepare us for reentry into society. Meditation (the heart of buddhist practice) is used to train the mind in kindness and love for the whole of society. By training ourselves, we are helping society. After all, we are society and society is us. Second, it says that we must work towards quality in our meditative training, not quantity. We must bring breathing techniques and walking meditation into all parts of our day - not just during our sitting meditation."Chapter 5: Working for Peace" talks about conflict resolution and how it is done in a monestary. It is comprised of the following steps - (1) "Face to Face Sitting" and discussion with the entire community of monks. (2) "Rememberance" is a discussion by all parties of the history of the conflict so that all parties understand all sides of the story. (3) "Non-stubbornness" is the expectation that all parties will work to resolve the issue and not be stubborn. (4) "Covering Mud with Straw" is a practice of covering the conflict (the "mud") with loving kindness ("straw"). This is accomplished through having a senior monk represent each party to the dispute and discuss the situation in kind words. (5) "Voluntary Confession" is as it sounds. Each party to the dispute is expected to point out their own shortcomings without prompting from others. (6) "Decision by Consensus" and "Accepting the Verdict" are also self-explanatory, the whole assembly passes a verdict and the monks must accept that verdict or leave the community."Chapter 6: Interbeing" is Thich Nhat Hanh's proposed structure for American Buddhism. As he states, each new country has its own variation(s) of buddhism which fit with the culture. He suggests that the concept of "Interbeing" and its 14 precepts would work nicely with the American culture."Chapter 7: Meditation in Daily Life" reminds the reader that meditation is the key to buddhist practice. The chapter makes some suggestions as to how it can be more incorporated into family and personal time. He also makes some suggestions on technique, choosing a Buddha statue or painting, and time of practice.Overall, it's a lovely book. Thich Nhat Hanh definitely has an eloquent way of presenting his message. I had read several reviews of this book and Thich Nhat Hanh's other writings before purchasing this book. They were overwhelmingly positive. Now I see why.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Calming, simply written. Gently expounds basic tenets of meditation and Buddhism. A very easy, sweet read...
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
U here
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
..........
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
You therr
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This is my favorite of his books. Good day-to-day reading.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago